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  1. #31

    Mar 2005
    301
    10 times

    Ancient Civilization Beneath Death Valley?

    Ancient Civilization Beneath Death Valley?

    Bourke Lee, in his book 'DEATH VALLEY MEN' (MacMillan Co., N.Y. 1932), chapter: "Old Gold", describes a conversation which he had several years ago with a small group of Death valley residents. The conversation had eventually turned to the subject of Paihute Indian legends. At one point two of the men, Jack and Bill, described their experience with an 'underground city' which they claimed to have discovered after one of them had fallen through the bottom of an old mine shaft near Wingate Pass.

    They found themselves in a natural underground cavern which they claimed to have followed about 20 miles north into the heart of the Panamint Mountains. To their amazement, they allegedly found themselves in an huge, ancient, underground cavern city. They claimed that they discovered within the city several perfectly preserved 'mummies', which wore thick arm bands, wielded gold spears, etc. The city had apparently been abandoned for ages, except for the mummies, and the entire underground system looked very ancient. It was formerly lit, they found out by accident, by an ingenious system of lights fed by subterranean gases. They claimed to have seen a large, polished round table which looked as if it may have been part of an ancient council chamber, giant statues of solid gold, stone vaults and drawers full of gold bars and gemstones of all kinds, heavy stone wheelbarrows which were perfectly balanced and scientifically-constructed so that a child could use them, huge stone doors which were almost perfectly balanced by counter-weights, and other incredible sights. They also claimed to have followed the caverns upwards to a higher level which ultimately opened out onto the face of the Panamints, about half-way up the eastern slope, in the form of a few ancient tunnel-like quays. They realized that the valley below was once under water and they eventually came to the conclusion that the arched openings were ancient 'docks' for sea vessels. They could allegedly see Furnace Creek Ranch and Wash far below them.

    They told Bourke Lee that they had brought some of the treasure out of the caverns and tried to set up a deal with certain people, including scientists associated with the Smithsonian Institute, in order to gain help to explore and publicize the city as one of the 'wonders of the world'. These efforts ended in disappointment however when a 'friend' of theirs stole the treasure (which was also the evidence) and they were scoffed at and rejected by the scientists when they went to show them the 'mine' entrance and could not find it. A recent cloud- burst, they claimed, had altered and rearranged the entire countryside and the landscape did not look like it had been before.

    When Lee last heard from the two men, Bill and Jack, they were preparing to climb the east face of the Panamints to locate the ancient tunnel openings or quays high up the side of the steep slope. Bourke Lee never did see or hear from his friends ever again.

    Is the Bill in the story above Cptbil? Lol. If he goes into the Panamints again next year, I may consider going along.

  2. #32
    Kentucky Kache

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    Hey, that's a great story. True or false, you can't say It's not Interesting.

  3. #33

    Dec 2003
    36
    4 times

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    I agree with Parangjim- a thread devoted to Pirates and their treasure would be fantastic!

  4. #34
    Gold, Money, History...... It all fits in together REAL nice.

    Sep 2005
    George, Washington
    9
    2 times

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    I have noticed a certain lack of North West legends in all the posts. I am a new member to this site, but I have been searching for John Welch's cache of gold nuggets for about 5 years. Any info anyone could get me about this legend would be very helpful. I allready have satellite maps and other reasearch done, but the area is about 70% under water. Also, any info about the sentinal mountain gold bullion??
    How do you help a drowning treasure hunter?  You take your foot off the back of their neck. 

  5. #35

    Mar 2005
    301
    10 times

    One for Jeff - LOST TREASURE OF THE VOYAGEURS

    http://www.coudy.com/Austin/Scully4.htm
    THE LOST TREASURE OF THE VOYAGEURS
    By Francis X. Scully
    Those who claim to be "in the know" feel that it is valued over $350,000 by today?s standards, and perhaps even more. Often mentioned by the Senecas in the tales and legends handed down by the elders, the lost treasure of Borie may be the least known of all the hidden wealth yet to be found in America. Yet, there is a good chance that it lies buried somewhere a few miles south of one of the nation?s greatest and busiest highways near Borie, in the heart of the vacation paradise known as God?s Country, Potter County, USA.
    Late in the 1690?s, almost a full century before the white man?s first recorded visit to what is now Potter County, a small party of French Canadian voyageurs left New Orleans by raft,for the return trip to Montreal. The planned route was up the Mississippi to the junction of the Ohio and then up the Beautiful River, as the Indians call it, to the Allegheny and then northward to the mouth of the Conewango near present day Warren. From that point, a short run would bring the expedition to Chautauqua Lake near the present day furniture center of Jamestown, New York. From the extreme north end of that muskellunge paradise, the party could practically roll down hill by the way of Prendergrast Creek and then home free by the way of Lake Erie. The entire trip would be made by water, without the danger and travail of long overland, backbreaking portages.
    And so the coureur de bois left New Orleans on rafts loaded with provisions and a number of small kegs, each of which were loaded with gold coins covered with a thin film of gunpowder, and anchored securely to the crude log transports by means of ropes and iron nails. The gold was to be delivered to His Most Gracious Majesty?s Royal Governor in Montreal,and the party was instructed to guard the valuable cargo with their lives. Under no circumstances was it to fall into the hands of the English, the Americans nor the hated Senecas, who were always at war with the French.
    And so the party consisting of about a score of French runners, two Jesuit priests, and a few Indian scouts made it up the swollen Mississippi without incident, other than to comment on the awesome breadth of the Father of Waters, when at flood stage. It is generally believed that the party spent a week or so at the mouth of the Ohio, in repairing the rafts, and building canoes for the trip up the narrower and swifter streams which the Gauls would encounter as they proceeded further north.
    From time to time, the party bumped into hunting Red Men, who were gifted and feted, as only the French could do it. During the evening by firelight the two Black Robes drew maps of the areas that had been visited during the day. The Jesuits for reasons never explained in history books, were the greatest cartographers of their day, and maps made by the great missionaries of that era, survive to this day, remarkable in their accuracy and description. Occasionally the party surveyed locations for forts and settlements, and hunted for provisions to feed the ravenous appetites of the expedition.
    All agreed that never had they seen such a paradise as what the English called Pennsylvania, as they entered the Allegheny near the present Golden Triangle of Pittsburgh. Bison grazed in the open meadows and elk browsed in the park-like forests bordering the historic river. The rich bottom lands could produce enough food to feed all of France, mused the French, and rightfully it all belonged to the King of France, by right of discovery, they told themselves. There was one difficulty other than the falls of the Upper Allegheny that the French couldn?t discount, and that was the relentless warriors of the Seneca Nation, whose home the fair skinned Europeans were rapidly approaching. Implacable enemies of the French since the time of Champlain, the fierce warriors would like nothing better than an opportunity to waylay the little party. The leaders shuddered as they approached present day Warren. The warwhoop of the Senecas had often been heard in the French settlements of Canada, and just a few year?s previous the stalwart and ferocious braves had brought the tomahawk and scalping knife all the way to Montreal, killing over two hundred in the process. The Frenchmen shuddered at the thought of a confrontation with their most mortal enemy.
    And so it was decided to eliminate the voyage up the narrow, tortuous Conewango, where the little band would be more vulnerable, than in the wider rivers further south, and head on up the Allegheny to its headwaters, thus skirting the hunting ground of their fierce adversary, to a certain degree.
    From the head of the Allegheny, they could portage to the source of the Genessee River near present day Wellsville and then northward to the shores of Lake Ontario. An attack through the gorges of the Genessee was a virtual impossibility reasoned the French.
    And so it is believed that the little band reached the area near what is now North Coudersport. Harassed throughout the upriver trip from Cornplanter to what is now Coudersport, the voyageurs and the priests decided that they would bury the kegs of gold, mark the site, and continue as rapidly as possible toward the Genessee if they expected to retain their hair. And so legend has it that they turned south, toward the valley now known as Borie. Near a huge rock which the Jesuits marked with a cross chiseled into its side, the now thoroughly frightened Frenchmen buried the gold. A map was made of the location, and the band headed once more back to the Allegheny and then made the perilous thirty miles over the mountains to the Genessee. Hiding by day, and traveling by night, the French made it to the Genessee and thus back to Canada where they reported to the exasperated governor that they had buried a tremendous treasure near a large rock, somewhere near the head of the Allegheny. They had marked the site with a cross, explained the Jesuits.
    For years, the Senecas mentioned a rock in the Borie area that had a puzzling carving upon its face. But then the white man was known to do unusual things, even planting things that wouldn?t grow. Since the carving had some religious significance, thought the Indians, they did not disturb the rock or search for the hidden treasure, of which few were aware, until the return of the French to look for the buried loot.
    It has never been found, and has become one of the lesser known legends of Potter County. While it has a ring of the improbable, it is a known fact that several historians mentioned the great rock, as did the Senecas. If true, it is one of the largest treasures to be buried in an area which can lay claim to four of the greatest caches made in other centuries. Few have searched for it.

  6. #36

    Apr 2003
    SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
    112
    15 times

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    JamesSpade2:

    I have 3 stories on Welch I can send you. I'm still looking for your Sentinel Mountain story---Any name associated with it ? Email me your home mail address & I'll mail those stories tomorrow.

    FLOYD MANN
    FRMPINK@AOL.COM
    FLOYD MANN
    FRMPINK@AOL.COM
    http://www.LostTreasureUSA.com
    http://www.KnightsOfTheGoldenCircle-KGC.com

  7. #37

    Sep 2005
    Millbrook, Al.
    28
    1 times

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    Hello Marc,
    First let me say that, beings as I just found this site last night, that this is one heck of a treasure related discussion forum website. Thanks for it being there!

    Now as for your question, I have an idea or suggestion. Since people are always posting or asking about treasure in this locale or that, in this state or that, it would be neat to have, perhaps within the "Treasure leads" forum, States listed in alphebetical order, and people can click on that state's name to post or ask about treasure pertaining to that particular state on that state's thread or board rather than have to scroll and hunt around for threads pertaining to their home states or a state they are curious about.
    Just an idea.
    Thanks again for a great site.
    Pistolero/David Edelen
    Author of "MORE GHOSTS AND EERIE TALES OF ALABAMA; True Tales of the Supernatural and the Unexplained!" www.publishamerica.com/books/8363

  8. #38

    Sep 2005
    3

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    There is a lot of speculation considering Wellsville is in New York and would not have bee visited until after the journey up the Genesse. The allegheny goes on to Colesburg close to Gold all of which are still in Pennsylvania. It would be nice if the map could be obtained considering how good the jesuits were suppose to be at mapping. i could visit the area to check out any info in Borie, and i would rule out Welsville.

  9. #39

    Mar 2005
    301
    10 times

    MAPS OF THE JESUITS

    http://www.collectionscanada.ca/expl...4-150.3-e.html
    NATIONAL LIBRARY OF CANADA
    http://www.collectionscanada.ca/expl...24-1430-e.html
    BLACK ROBES AND THEIR MAPS

    The above links are for the National Library of Canada, and the maps of the Black Robes, as the First Nations called the Jesuits. A very easy site to navigate, unlike our Library of Congress site. Records and journals of the French explorers etc. are also here.

  10. #40

    Apr 2003
    SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH
    112
    15 times

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    Here are a few hundred from my website:

    http://www.losttreasureusa.com/State...eTreasures.htm

    FLOYD MANN
    FLOYD MANN
    FRMPINK@AOL.COM
    http://www.LostTreasureUSA.com
    http://www.KnightsOfTheGoldenCircle-KGC.com

  11. #41
    us
    Fortune Favors the BOLD, while Karma Favors the Wise!

    Jan 2006
    Arizona Vagrant
    Modded SD2000 / White's Goldmaster 4B / Fisher FX-3 / Fisher Gemini / Schiebel MIMID
    6,527
    6606 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    Hey Marc,
    Here are a few choice stories from SoCal that have been around for a long time:

    1. Pegleg Smith's black coated gold nuggets

    2. Mexican Bandits who went up and down California raiding towns, missions, and the like, plundering all the wealth they came across. Making a bad decision, they attacked a tribe of local Indians, killing many braves and taking some women. When the rest of the tribe returned they set out after the Mexicans and caught them in the area of the confluence of Carrizo Wash and San Felipe Creek in the Anza-Borrego Desert near the Anza Pass. At first, the Indians left the "10 Oxcarts of loot" right there where it lay. Later the chief took some trusty braves and hid the gold in a cave in the mountains near that area.

    I thought this story was just that until about two years ago, an off-roader who fell off his vehicle in that area cut his arm on a little gold box that he found containing a gold and ruby crucifix!

    3. The story that is backed up by reports in the royal archives in Madrid about the Spanish Galleon that is somewhere under the dunes between Yuma, AZ. and Borrego Springs. These dunes cross highway 8. This Spanish Galleon contains hundreds of baskets of pearls and a small chest of gold.

    Enjoy-Mike
    "You wouldn't like me when I'm mad, because I back up my rage with hard facts and logic!" - The Credible Hulk

    ............... ALWAYS REMEMBER: When you make a typo, the errorists win...................Aloha Snackbar!

  12. #42
    us
    Seeker of lost treasure's

    Oct 2005
    C.R. HKt.B Sometimes there's not a right way, or a wrong way. Sometimes there's only one way.
    1,778
    87 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    Randy,

    I'm interested in the Texas Spider Rocks treasure.
    Can you feel me in on it here, or PM me.
    Clayton in Virginia-----Roadquest
    Sometime's there's not a right way, or a wrong way.
    Sometime's there's only one way.

    Where there is no economy, people will create one.

    No one rule fit's all

    '' 17 Tons of Gold in New Mexico " Thread started in 2005.

  13. #43
    onepick

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    the 7 citys of gold
    mines that the spanish started before they were killed by indians in arizona

  14. #44
    us
    Jun 2003
    arizona
    336
    10 times

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    THE BOOK THAT I AM NOW READING GOLDEN MIRAGES IS ABOUT PEGLEG SMITH LOST SILVER MINE AND ABOUT THE BLANK NUGGETS IT LOOKS LIKE THERE WERE MORE THAN ONE PEGLEG SMITH THE BOOK WRITTEN BACK IN 1940 I HAVE ONLY READ 109 PAGES AS OF YET BUCK
    Anxiety in the heart of man causes deppression.But a good word makes it glad.  IN GOD WE TRUST.......

  15. #45
    us
    Dec 2005
    Eugene, Oregon
    Fisher CZ5, White's GM VSat
    4,095
    126 times

    Re: Looking for other treasure legends...

    How about the Lost Red Blanket mine? AKA Ed Scheffelins lost mine. He was the prospector from Oregon who discovered the silver lodes at Tombstone. In fact thats how they were named- one prospector told him "Ed, all you're going to find out there is your tombstone" as the indians were on the rampage at the time.

    Supposedly it has been found, but I don't know if it has been proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

 

 
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