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Thread: Buried Pirate Treasure in Panama

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  1. #31

    Mar 2015
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    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Pirate's Buried Treasure theme really took hold late 19th century through most of early 20th to mid 20th century. Many such yarns and claims came up. There has be a few people claiming to be related to Captain Morgan through the 20th century. Even other supposed treasure legends attributed to Captain Morgan hiding treasure. One such story is from Australian town and country journal dated 16th November 1895. No one claiming Morgan ancestry but buried treasure from one of Morgans ships as he fled Porto Bello after the 1671 raid on Panama.

    Santa Catalina, and has probably been responsible for more expeditions than than others. Santa Catalina is a little point sand and rock rising out of the Caribbean Sea, ninety miles off the Mosquito Coast of Central America. It is about a mile in circumference, and contains a network of caverns.

    Morgan was the most successful of the buccaneers that preyed upon the Spaniards in America, and his raid upon Panama in 1670-71 was his greatest enterprise. According" to the legend, one shipload of its plunder was lost by Morgan. The crew of one. vessel took the precaution of running away with the treasure, with which it was laden, in order to prevent Morgan from indulging in the practice referred to.

    Morgan captured them subsequently, but not until they had disposed of their spoils, and they died under torture rather than reveal
    the hiding place. For a couple of centuries legendary stories have been current that the treasures were buried on Santa Catalina.
    Two men are reputed to have found treasures on Santa'Catalina in the, last twenty years; One may be dismissed briefly. He is described as Alexander Archibald, of Old Providence, an island of the same group, and he is said to have discovered a jar containing £5000 while digging a. well.

    The story has simply never been verified; nor has .the existence of Mr. Archibald been demonstrated. There is a good deal to be said about the other man, John Currie, trader, of Kingston, Jamaica. He landed upon the island from a Spanish vessel one day in search of wood .and water. . . While there he came across an iguana and chased it. . The animal ran into a hole. He put his hand into the hole, and felt some masonry, and discovered the walled-up entrance to a cavern.

    Making his way in, this was the glorious sight he beheld-nine earthen jars as tail as a man filled to the brim with Spanish doubloon; cases filled with jewels, and gold ware and silverware strewn about. Wishing to conceal the existence of the treasure from the Spaniards on the vessel, he contented himself with taking about £2000 in gold and some jewellery. Then he replaced the masonry and sailed away. Currie, went back to Kingston.

    And there the late Eari of Lonsdale came upon the scene. , In the winter of 1879-80, while cruising In his yacht in the West Indies,' he heard about Currie, looked him up, and got him to tell about the discovery. . Currie exhibited as proofs that his story was true some ancient Spanish doubloons and some very curious ornaments so with diamonds in an antique fashion.

    The Earl was soon convinced, and an 'agreement ' was entered Into between the two by which Lonsdale was to contribute his yacht for the purpose of án expédition, ; and Currie was to disclose the opening to the cavern.

    At the last moment Currie brought the projected expedition to a stand still by,disappearing. A. tragedy followed this fiasco. Currie had exhibited his Spanish doubloons and diamond ornaments to Mr. Compton, the British Consul at Colon. Mr. Compton, like others, was finally convinced of the truth of the story, and risked his whole fortune in a new expedition in search of the treasure at Santa Catalina. To guard against interference, on the part of the natives, Mr., Compton secured through the influence of his'friends the services of a British man-of-war to act as convoy. ' Currie could not avoid accompanying this expedition, hut, like the others, it was a failure. After reaching the island Currie announced that he had decided to refuse to show where the treasure.was hidden, because he was afraid that in the division he would not receive a fair share.

    Threats and promises alike proved useless to make him alter his determination.- Then they sailed away, and Mr. Compton blew out his
    brains in despair.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Henry Morgan was so famous nearly every mosquito bitten rat hole in Caribbean wanted to claim to be the hiding place of Morgans lost treasure. There are stories of Morgans treasure hid in Porto Bello, Panama Providence, St Catherine's island, Cayman island, along chargres River, Roatan Honduras and even in the hills of Jamaica itself.

    So when some one claims such things I tend to be weary of such claims. I have other stories of Morgans alleged hidden treasure. But once again old Kanacki need his grandpa nap.

    Kanacki
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  2. #32

    Mar 2005
    120
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    Legends.
    They say that within every legend there is a grain of truth.
    KANACKI, Simon1 and perdidogringo like this.
    Every problem gives you an opportunity to solve it.

  3. #33
    Charter Member
    us
    Oct 2014
    Massachusetts
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    Good luck on your research and search!
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  4. #34

    Mar 2015
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    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    One such treasure yarn attributed to Henry Morgan was the island of Catalina part of Columbia but off the coast of Nicaragua.

    There is a rock outcrop called Henry Morgans head.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Kanacki
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  5. #35
    co
    May 2010
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    34 times
    A grain of truth on a beach of fantasy.
    Obviously this is not the way to search for treasure.
    If we want to search for treasure, we must first try to verify the facts.
    But what are facts?
    Even if we have 5 eye witnesses reporting an event, each of the accounts will be different from the others.
    The accounts are subjective.
    Each individual sees and hears and feels things with his own senses. As an example, The loss of an eye or an ear might have been quite common in the pirate world.
    Or, Exquemelin might have had a grudge against Henry Morgan and "see" things from a different angle because of that.
    If we are lucky, we may find some coincidences.
    Many coincidences confirming a fact, is probably the best we can hope for.
    Then we need to use common sense, like: you are running away from an army of angry Spaniards, with 100 pounds of plundered silver plates and candlesticks on your back. How long will you hold on to the silver? At what point will you just dump it and run for your life?
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  6. #36
    co
    May 2010
    105
    34 times

    Henry Morgan

    Could the initials HM on this 17th century plate mean it belonged to Henry Morgan?

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #37

    Apr 2011
    El Dorado
    Equinox 800, Garrett Pro-Pointer AT
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    Interesting Thread

    It's good to see some attention given to Panama! I've detected all over Panama and have had a bit of success finding some goodies. I, personally, don't believe Morgan left any wealth anywhere. He had no reason to as after sacking (what is now called) Old Panama he eventually drank himself to death as a governor of and a land owner in Jamaica. He would have had plenty of time and opportunity to return to Panama or anywhere else for any "buried treasure." Especially when he exerted so much effort to acquire the wealth to begin with.

    The only documented treasure ever buried on purpose in Panama (that I know of) was Sir Francis Drake's hastily buried treasure south of Nombre de Dios after he robbed the mule train in 1573. And Drake certainly didn't want to bury anything. He was forced to as it was more treasure than he could carry away with the Spanish reinforcements quickly closing in. And the Spanish (and a couple weeks later some of Drake's men who returned to the scene) came back and easily dug up the vast majority of it. I still think the odd silver bar is there and have searched the area several times. However, anything left has sunk far too deep in a tropical environment, far beyond the reach of most standard metal detectors.
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  8. #38

    Mar 2015
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    In the following newspaper Hobart Mercury dated Wed 30TH of January 1924. Bernard Joacum Keegan a Diver and Second Mate of the American Salvage tug Favorite. During a salvage work found out from locals about a legendary sea cave on Providence island made a dive to search for Henry Morgans alleged treasure.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    No doubt the locals was influenced by the earlier 1880 treasure hunt that ended in failure.

    Kanacki
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  9. #39

    Mar 2015
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    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by Colombiapictures View Post
    Could the initials HM on this 17th century plate mean it belonged to Henry Morgan?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Hello Columbia pictures.

    Sadly not Henry Morgan was not the owner. If you look at the HM it means his Majesty. The mint mark on the left is the mark of Charles the Second King of England And the Other Mint mark on the right is from the London Mint. While its not impossible the silver itself before being melted down came via Morgans invasion of Panama? But nothing is certain and almost impossible verify the origins other than originated from Bolivia Peru?

    Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was king of England, Scotland, and Ireland. He was king of Scotland from 1649 until his deposition in 1651, and king of England, Scotland and Ireland from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 until his death.

    It should be noted all silver from Charles II time period in England is referred to Charles II silverware even if he did not actually own it. However picture you posted and Charles II mint mark and HR point to the item actually belonging to Charles the II.


    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Jul 11, 2019 at 05:47 AM.

  10. #40

    Mar 2015
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    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Hello ColumbiaPictures

    My apologies I have lead you astray. After blowing up the picture.

    1. The mark on the right of the picture gives the place of manufacture It definitely London Tower Mint mark Crown sitting on top of a Tudor Rose on the right that was used between 1562 and 1578. You can see the word on London on top of the Crown and English Tudor rose. The London mark date from the time of Henry VIII. That could indicate the silver came via Francis Drake : ‎1563–1596? But definitely not related Henry Morgans time. . By 1600, Porto Bello had replaced Nombre de Dios (where Sir Francis Drake had first attacked a Spanish settlement) as the Isthmus of Panama's Caribbean port for the Spanish Silver Train and the annual treasure fleet.

    2, H M letters is the initials of the silver smith the craftsman of the piece.

    There should be a single letter inside a square stamped somewhere but not in the picture? It is stamped in cycles of twenty letters of the alphabet of different shape identifies the year in which the piece was verified by the Assay Office.

    Spanish ships had brought goods from the New World since Christopher Columbus's first expedition of 1492. The organized system of convoys dates from 1564, but Spain sought to protect shipping prior to that by organizing protection around the largest Caribbean island, Cuba and the maritime region of southern Spain and the Canary Islands because of attacks by pirates and foreign navies. The Spanish government created a system of convoys in the 1560s in response to the sacking of Havana by French privateers.

    3. On the left side mark is a bit of a mystery? After the trauma of the English civil war much silver plate was lost stolen traded from original owners. Charles II returned from exile and was made king after the Republican commonwealth failed and brought in the restoration period of the monarchy began. Charles came back virtually broke and acquired silver recovered from lost estates such as his ancestor Henry VIII As far as I tell it has Charles on the bottom but hard to see because of heavy wear? However the name on closer examination does it not appear Charles II? Charles who belonged to the house of Stuart stamp mark on the left of the picture is not his crest. Its is possibly the mark of the maker ie silver smith. However Charles II official mint mark used from 1660-1662 was a crown used in the London mint.

    The origin of the silver was most likely from Scotland considering the earliest date of London marks. However it could still be possible that the silver was captured from the Spanish by Drake also before his world cruise on the golden hind?While it is true some of the more wealthy families had crests stamped onto their silver ware because silver back then was really a precious metal. But later generations as more silver became available did not seek the need to label their own silver.

    Duty marks did not come into practice until 1794

    Note there should be marking of lion some where on the plate to conform to the standard purity. i should also state each town mint marks used their own stamped Date letters for example varied between each town mints. For example H would of been used 1545-46 in the London Mint. Glasgow Sheffield or Dublin etc would used their own different letter for the same date.

    I hope that gives you some more clarification.

    Kanacki
    Last edited by KANACKI; Jul 11, 2019 at 06:06 PM.

  11. #41
    Charter Member

    Jun 2015
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    Underwater B.B. stacking
    Well done Kanaki Your knowledge is incredible.
    treasurediver and BillA like this.

  12. #42

    Mar 2005
    120
    112 times
    That whole idea about pirates burying treasure. I can just imagine a whole row of Morgans buccaneers walking through the Panama jungle with pick and shovels on the shoulder. Ho, ho, a shovel and pick, ho, ho, a shovel and pick...
    It starts with Morgan: Hey you, pegleg, here is a handful of pieces of eight. Run to the hardware store and buy 2 dozens of pick and shovels so we can bury our treasure. And don't forget to bring me the receipt.
    gunsil, KANACKI and perdidogringo like this.
    Every problem gives you an opportunity to solve it.

  13. #43

    Mar 2005
    120
    112 times
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1731684Perdidogringo,
    thank you for your input. Finally somebody who has actually been searching for treasure in Panama. That must have been very interesting. By any chance, do you know of any Spanish accounts of the pirate history? Do they have any archives in Panama? Are the old ruins touristically developed? Is it legal to use a metal detector in Panama?
    The old pirate in the picture claims that his machine is easily capable to find a treasure hoard 10 feet deep.
    Every problem gives you an opportunity to solve it.

  14. #44
    us
    Jul 2013
    Vietnam, Saigon
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    A treasure map?
    SMH....

  15. #45

    May 2005
    Drake, Costa Rica
    590
    797 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Mekong Mike View Post
    A treasure map?
    SMH....
    no, really - only the specially (hidden) marked boxes of Cheerios had the map
    perdidogringo likes this.

 

 
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