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  1. #1

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    7 times

    Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Probably the single man in US history most involved and successful with gold finds, lost treasure and lost mines is Jacob Snively. Yet, he's probably also the least known.

    Snively commanded troops at the Battle of San Jacinto, became the Secretary of the Army for the Texas Republic, [might have] accompanied the Texan-Santa Fe Expedition as a scout/spy, commanded the Snively Expedition looting Mexican commerce on the Santa Fe Trail in 1843, where his party encountered [eventually General] Crook and a party of US Army and were forced to surrender all their arms despite the fact they were on Mexican territory, rather than US.

    In 1849, Snively left Texas and journeyed to California via the Gila Trail and found his element. He was among the first to find gold at Gila Bend and found the strike at Vulture Gulch, beginning that gold rush.

    Later, he was one of 12 men who left Tucson in 1860 to journey east prospecting the upper Gila, where he and two others made the strike at Pinos Altos and began that Gold Rush. According to unofficial local tradition he commanded a company of Arizona Scouts to fight Apache when Hunter led Confederates to capture and occupy Tucson. No official records confirm this, and Carlton, when he was organizing the California Volunteers, warns the US Army commander at Yuma Crossing to keep close watch for 'Colonel Snively' whom he knows to be a spy.

    Meanwhile, Snively vanishes, probably busy working the 'Lost Snively Diggings', returning to Pinos Altos with a mule loaded with 60 pounds of gold which he claimed to have panned in 10 days from a canyon with no bedrock and working an area the size of 'a wagon box, no deeper than three feet'.

    In 1866, he returned to Texas for the 2nd Snively Expedition [treasure] to the upper-Colorado, which was a failure.

    Snively was a surveyor/engineer by training, and he must have kept records and notes, but after he was killed by Apache in 1872 at Vulture Gulch, they've never emerged.

    Somewhere, maybe a box in an attic, some family archive, there might still exist the mass of written material Snively almost certainly kept. If anyone ever finds it, a lot of unanswered questions might well come unravelled.

    Jack


  2. #2
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
    BS
    2,742
    980 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Highmountain
    Probably the single man in US history most involved and successful with gold finds, lost treasure and lost mines is Jacob Snively. Yet, he's probably also the least known.

    Snively commanded troops at the Battle of San Jacinto, became the Secretary of the Army for the Texas Republic, [might have] accompanied the Texan-Santa Fe Expedition as a scout/spy, commanded the Snively Expedition looting Mexican commerce on the Santa Fe Trail in 1843, where his party encountered [eventually General] Crook and a party of US Army and were forced to surrender all their arms despite the fact they were on Mexican territory, rather than US.

    In 1849, Snively left Texas and journeyed to California via the Gila Trail and found his element. He was among the first to find gold at Gila Bend and found the strike at Vulture Gulch, beginning that gold rush.

    Later, he was one of 12 men who left Tucson in 1860 to journey east prospecting the upper Gila, where he and two others made the strike at Pinos Altos and began that Gold Rush. According to unofficial local tradition he commanded a company of Arizona Scouts to fight Apache when Hunter led Confederates to capture and occupy Tucson. No official records confirm this, and Carlton, when he was organizing the California Volunteers, warns the US Army commander at Yuma Crossing to keep close watch for 'Colonel Snively' whom he knows to be a spy.

    Meanwhile, Snively vanishes, probably busy working the 'Lost Snively Diggings', returning to Pinos Altos with a mule loaded with 60 pounds of gold which he claimed to have panned in 10 days from a canyon with no bedrock and working an area the size of 'a wagon box, no deeper than three feet'.

    In 1866, he returned to Texas for the 2nd Snively Expedition [treasure] to the upper-Colorado, which was a failure.

    Snively was a surveyor/engineer by training, and he must have kept records and notes, but after he was killed by Apache in 1872 at Vulture Gulch, they've never emerged.

    Somewhere, maybe a box in an attic, some family archive, there might still exist the mass of written material Snively almost certainly kept. If anyone ever finds it, a lot of unanswered questions might well come unravelled.

    Jack
    Always been fascinated with Snively. Jason Baxter was another.
    "The gods were smiling when you were born. Now they're laughing."​ Chinese fortune cookie

    Karmageddon
    : It's like, when everybody is sending off all those bad vibes, right? And then, like, the earth explodes and it's like, a serious bummer.







  3. #3

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    7 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Springfield
    Quote Originally Posted by Highmountain
    Probably the single man in US history most involved and successful with gold finds, lost treasure and lost mines is Jacob Snively. Yet, he's probably also the least known.

    Snively commanded troops at the Battle of San Jacinto, became the Secretary of the Army for the Texas Republic, [might have] accompanied the Texan-Santa Fe Expedition as a scout/spy, commanded the Snively Expedition looting Mexican commerce on the Santa Fe Trail in 1843, where his party encountered [eventually General] Crook and a party of US Army and were forced to surrender all their arms despite the fact they were on Mexican territory, rather than US.

    In 1849, Snively left Texas and journeyed to California via the Gila Trail and found his element. He was among the first to find gold at Gila Bend and found the strike at Vulture Gulch, beginning that gold rush.

    Later, he was one of 12 men who left Tucson in 1860 to journey east prospecting the upper Gila, where he and two others made the strike at Pinos Altos and began that Gold Rush. According to unofficial local tradition he commanded a company of Arizona Scouts to fight Apache when Hunter led Confederates to capture and occupy Tucson. No official records confirm this, and Carlton, when he was organizing the California Volunteers, warns the US Army commander at Yuma Crossing to keep close watch for 'Colonel Snively' whom he knows to be a spy.

    Meanwhile, Snively vanishes, probably busy working the 'Lost Snively Diggings', returning to Pinos Altos with a mule loaded with 60 pounds of gold which he claimed to have panned in 10 days from a canyon with no bedrock and working an area the size of 'a wagon box, no deeper than three feet'.

    In 1866, he returned to Texas for the 2nd Snively Expedition [treasure] to the upper-Colorado, which was a failure.

    Snively was a surveyor/engineer by training, and he must have kept records and notes, but after he was killed by Apache in 1872 at Vulture Gulch, they've never emerged.

    Somewhere, maybe a box in an attic, some family archive, there might still exist the mass of written material Snively almost certainly kept. If anyone ever finds it, a lot of unanswered questions might well come unravelled.

    Jack
    Always been fascinated with Snively. Jason Baxter was another.
    Yeah, Baxter's a mystery. A friend of mine located his grave in the Gila, but I've tried backtracking him... said he fought with Quantrill or Bloody Bill Anderson in the Civil War.... couldn't find any traces of him despite a lot of time spent searching. I suspect he picked up a different name somewhere along the trail to Pinos.

    But he also said he 'knew Adams' in Tucson before the party disaster, and knew Snively early-on. I've never found the names of the 12 in the Hunter debacle from Tucson who arrived back at the Rio Grande August 12, but I'm inclined to think Baxter might have been among them, went with Hunter to Texas, and eventually ended up in the Quantrill troubles.

    A friend of mine found a long-forgotten picture of him and McKenna decked out in mountain-man duds that gives a person a fine opportunity for studying the look of the man. Interesting hombre.

    Jack Swilling's another. The pic below from the AZ archives is enough to tell so much about him a person wouldn't want to know more straight-on, but to know a lot more from a distance. That slit on his hat looks as though it might have come out of an Apache get-together, the eyes say he's nobody to cross, and the Apache side-kick beside him ain't showing enough fire-power.

    Sometimes makes me think I was born too late.

    Thanks for the reply
    Jack
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #4
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
    BS
    2,742
    980 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Highmountain

    Yeah, Baxter's a mystery. A friend of mine located his grave in the Gila, but I've tried backtracking him... said he fought with Quantrill or Bloody Bill Anderson in the Civil War.... couldn't find any traces of him despite a lot of time spent searching. I suspect he picked up a different name somewhere along the trail to Pinos.

    But he also said he 'knew Adams' in Tucson before the party disaster, and knew Snively early-on. I've never found the names of the 12 in the Hunter debacle from Tucson who arrived back at the Rio Grande August 12, but I'm inclined to think Baxter might have been among them, went with Hunter to Texas, and eventually ended up in the Quantrill troubles.

    A friend of mine found a long-forgotten picture of him and McKenna decked out in mountain-man duds that gives a person a fine opportunity for studying the look of the man. Interesting hombre.

    Jack Swilling's another. The pic from the AZ archives is enough to tell so much about him a person wouldn't want to know more straight-on, but to know a lot more from a distance. That slit on his hat looks as though it might have come out of an Apache get-together, the eyes say he's nobody to cross, and the Apache side-kick beside him ain't showing enough fire-power.

    Sometimes makes me think I was born too late.

    Thanks for the reply
    Jack
    A lot of us were. Ever hear anything about Jesse James' (yes, that one) activities in Hillsboro and Silver City in the 1870's? Ross C., an old friend of mine originally from the Clovis area and a lifelong TH-er, whose daddy just happened to have John Trammel as a houseguest when Ross was a boy, had some good info about JJ using the old Southern Hotel in Silver as his headquarters. Unfortunately, Ross died a couple years ago and all his notes became unavailable. Snively, Baxter, Adams, Hearst, all the old Confederates from Texas, James, the Daltons, lots of other players - all associated with the 'KGC' and all active in these parts. If you haven't begun looking into these theories, you may wish to skip out because once the bulb lights up, you'll be sorry you didn't start earlier. Sometimes I wish I could believe the history books.
    "The gods were smiling when you were born. Now they're laughing."​ Chinese fortune cookie

    Karmageddon
    : It's like, when everybody is sending off all those bad vibes, right? And then, like, the earth explodes and it's like, a serious bummer.







  5. #5

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    7 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Hadn't ever come across the Jesse James story for SW New Mexico. A while back I came across an account he was in Las Vegas once and ended up spending some time talking with Billy [yeah that one] the Kid... didn't have much use for him, though young Bill wanted to set up something between them. JJ figured he had enough trouble in his life and wild, reckless crazymen. [Jesse James was my Neighbor might have been the book]. But William French in Reflections of a Western Ranchman, 1880ish tells of having hired the Butch and Sundance lot to work for him out toward Luna without knowing he'd done it. [Also gives an eyewitness account of Alfego Baca's 'Texas War' that's worth reading].

    I've never gotten into KGC, though I know a lot of folk who are and whom I respect. Just a matter of time I'd imagine, provided I live enough days and can't go outside.

    Thanks for the JJ info. Gonna have to dig a bit on that, I thinks.

    Gracias,
    Jack


  6. #6

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    7 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    A couple of links to Jesse James in New Mexico...

    Couldn't find reference to KGC connections but haven't 'deep searched' for it yet.

    Jack

    Billy the Kid and Jesse James
    http://www.angelfire.com/mi2/billythekid/jesse.html
    http://snipurl.com/28wo7 [www_angelfire_com]



    http://www.wildwestweb.net/jesseincal.html
    http://snipurl.com/28wo9 [www_wildwestweb_net]

  7. #7
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
    BS
    2,742
    980 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Highmountain
    A couple of links to Jesse James in New Mexico...

    Couldn't find reference to KGC connections but haven't 'deep searched' for it yet.

    Jack

    Billy the Kid and Jesse James
    http://www.angelfire.com/mi2/billythekid/jesse.html
    http://snipurl.com/28wo7 [www_angelfire_com]



    http://www.wildwestweb.net/jesseincal.html
    http://snipurl.com/28wo9 [www_wildwestweb_net]
    How do you like this one?

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	JJ.jpg 
Views:	1171 
Size:	101.7 KB 
ID:	204935  
    "The gods were smiling when you were born. Now they're laughing."​ Chinese fortune cookie

    Karmageddon
    : It's like, when everybody is sending off all those bad vibes, right? And then, like, the earth explodes and it's like, a serious bummer.







  8. #8

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    7 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Springfield
    Quote Originally Posted by Highmountain
    A couple of links to Jesse James in New Mexico...

    Couldn't find reference to KGC connections but haven't 'deep searched' for it yet.

    Jack

    Billy the Kid and Jesse James
    http://www.angelfire.com/mi2/billythekid/jesse.html
    http://snipurl.com/28wo7 [www_angelfire_com]



    http://www.wildwestweb.net/jesseincal.html
    http://snipurl.com/28wo9 [www_wildwestweb_net]
    How do you like this one?
    Can't offer much comment on that, but here's something to compare:

    [Edit: one of Cole's outstanding features was the size of his hands. Enormous hands. Most of the Youngers did. Any photo of a Younger I've ever seen where the hands were visible it stands out - But for what it's worth, the fancy-man in the bottom of the group prison pic definitely ain't Bob or James.]

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Younger, Cole & James left to right 72.jpg 
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Name:	Younger,L.to R,Bob,Henritietta,Cole,4th unknown, by J.M.Kuhn72,.jpg 
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Name:	Younger James, known photo in younger years72.jpg 
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Name:	Younger James, supposed photo of him72.jpg 
Views:	1029 
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ID:	204942  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Younger James, known photo right, Pinkerton photo of him left72.jpg 
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Name:	YOUNGER, JAMES & COLE AFTER CAPTURE AT NORTHFIELD, BK. CARL W72.jpg 
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  9. #9

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    7 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    However, getting back to Jacob Snively and his doings.

    Snively was among a group of others at Vulture Gulch when they were attacked. Snively was hit in the shoulder and fell from his horse but his compadres ran away and left him for the Apache. His other limbs were broken and he evidently took a long while dying.

    [Snively had encountered a similar situation in Texas 1866 with the Comanche, but instead of running and leaving their companion he shot all the horses, formed a small fortress with the carcasses and fought off the Comanche. He was vilified afterward by his companions for killing those horses, among other things they didn't approve of]

    A few days later a group came back and buried what was left of him in a shallow grave on-site.

    Seven years later Jack Swilling, his long-time friend, came back and exhumed his remains, carried them back to Gillette, Arizona and re-buried them. But while he was gone getting Snively, a stagecoach was robbed and Swilling was accused of doing it. He was arrested and spent the remainder of his life in prison awaiting trial. Contracted pneamonia and kicked.

    Fortunately, he was found posthumously to be innocent of the fabricated charges.


  10. #10
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
    BS
    2,742
    980 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Highmountain
    ... Fortunately, he was found posthumously to be innocent of the fabricated charges.
    Fortunate for whom?
    "The gods were smiling when you were born. Now they're laughing."​ Chinese fortune cookie

    Karmageddon
    : It's like, when everybody is sending off all those bad vibes, right? And then, like, the earth explodes and it's like, a serious bummer.







  11. #11

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    7 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Springfield
    Quote Originally Posted by Highmountain
    ... Fortunately, he was found posthumously to be innocent of the fabricated charges.
    Fortunate for whom?
    Just my own brand of humor. Doesn't get many laughs.

    Jack

  12. #12

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    7 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Snively's near-war incident between the United States and the Republic of Texas, 1843 - First-hand accounts by participants in the Snively Expedition


    Southwestern Historical Quarterly Online
    University of Texas Press

    http://www.tshaonline.org/shqonline/...ol=070&pag=079
    http://snipurl.com/2926x [www_tshaonline_org]

    Other good articles same TSHA issue:
    http://www.tshaonline.org/shqonline/070toc.html


    Another account of the Snively Expedition to the Arkansas River
    http://www.1stnmvi.com/NMV_Chapter1.htm
    http://snipurl.com/292f3 [www_1stnmvi_com]


    Edit- Here are some possibilities a person searching for the lost and forgotten Jacob Snively papers might consider:
    The Pennsylvania Snivelys

    Where Jacob Snively's papers might be stored in family records:


    http://www.pacivilwar.com/bios/snively_isaac.php
    http://snipurl.com/292g0 [www_pacivilwar_com]

    http://midatlantic.rootsweb.ancestry...8/g0000009.htm
    http://snipurl.com/292fw [midatlantic_rootsweb_ancestry_com]

    http://home.neo.rr.com/belknapinc/fam038.html
    http://snipurl.com/292fr [home_neo_rr_com]


    http://home.neo.rr.com/belknapinc/fam037.html
    http://snipurl.com/292fp [home_neo_rr_com]

    Website concerning Latter Day Saint Founder Joseph Smith webmaster - Vance Snively

    http://restorationbookstore.org/arti...43struggle.htm
    http://snipurl.com/292fm [restorationbookstore_org]


    Susan [Snively] Young - second wife of Brigham Young

    http://www.cc.utah.edu/~jay/Brigham_...ham_Young.html
    http://snipurl.com/292fg [www_cc_utah_edu]

    http://demo.familytreeguide.com/show...cb3c2eee6cbd38
    http://snipurl.com/292fc [demo_familytreeguide_com]

    http://demo.familytreeguide.com/getp...tree=Partridge
    http://snipurl.com/292fb [demo_familytreeguide_com]

    http://contentdm.lib.byu.edu/cdm4/br...CISOSTART=1,81
    http://snipurl.com/292f6 [contentdm_lib_byu_edu]

    Various other Snively links:

    Swilling Cemetery
    Black Canyon City, Arizona


    The two graves here are of Colonel Jacob Snively, born 1809 and died in 1871, and of Matilda Swilling, born 1867 and died October 19, 1875.

    http://n.j.dushane.home.comcast.net/...g/swilling.htm
    http://snipurl.com/293ek [n_j_dushane_home_comcast_net]


    History of Yuma and the Territorial Prison
    Tells the account of Snively's first gold strike

    http://www.lookoutnow.com/woz/yuma.htm
    http://snipurl.com/293en [www_lookoutnow_com]

    Arizona Mining Association credits Snively as making the first major gold strike in Arizona
    http://www.azcu.org/publicationsHistory3.php
    http://snipurl.com/293eo [www_azcu_org]

    Hunter, Snively, Tevis, Ewell etc
    http://members.tripod.com/~azrebel/page23.html
    http://snipurl.com/293ep [members_tripod_com]

    THE HISTORY OF LA PAZ & EHRENBERG
    http://www.azoutback.com/ehrenbergH.htm
    http://snipurl.com/293er [www_azoutback_com]

    Jack Swilling Biography
    http://www.amazon.com/Tragic-Jack-Ar...tag=dogpile-20
    http://snipurl.com/293eu [www_amazon_com]




    Attached Images Attached Images  

  13. #13

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    7 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Springfield
    Quote Originally Posted by Highmountain

    Yeah, Baxter's a mystery. A friend of mine located his grave in the Gila, but I've tried backtracking him... said he fought with Quantrill or Bloody Bill Anderson in the Civil War.... couldn't find any traces of him despite a lot of time spent searching. I suspect he picked up a different name somewhere along the trail to Pinos.

    But he also said he 'knew Adams' in Tucson before the party disaster, and knew Snively early-on. I've never found the names of the 12 in the Hunter debacle from Tucson who arrived back at the Rio Grande August 12, but I'm inclined to think Baxter might have been among them, went with Hunter to Texas, and eventually ended up in the Quantrill troubles.

    A friend of mine found a long-forgotten picture of him and McKenna decked out in mountain-man duds that gives a person a fine opportunity for studying the look of the man. Interesting hombre.

    Jack Swilling's another. The pic from the AZ archives is enough to tell so much about him a person wouldn't want to know more straight-on, but to know a lot more from a distance. That slit on his hat looks as though it might have come out of an Apache get-together, the eyes say he's nobody to cross, and the Apache side-kick beside him ain't showing enough fire-power.

    Sometimes makes me think I was born too late.

    Thanks for the reply
    Jack
    A lot of us were. Ever hear anything about Jesse James' (yes, that one) activities in Hillsboro and Silver City in the 1870's? Ross C., an old friend of mine originally from the Clovis area and a lifelong TH-er, whose daddy just happened to have John Trammel as a houseguest when Ross was a boy, had some good info about JJ using the old Southern Hotel in Silver as his headquarters. Unfortunately, Ross died a couple years ago and all his notes became unavailable. Snively, Baxter, Adams, Hearst, all the old Confederates from Texas, James, the Daltons, lots of other players - all associated with the 'KGC' and all active in these parts. If you haven't begun looking into these theories, you may wish to skip out because once the bulb lights up, you'll be sorry you didn't start earlier. Sometimes I wish I could believe the history books.
    Springfield: Interesting thoughts and implications.

    Maybe unrelated, or maybe not. A few years ago I was researching something in the microfilm archives of the Deming Headlight Newspaper from the early 20th Century. Almost every issue had old timers and pioneers from the area anecdoting accounts of the early times events and memories. [That's how Black Range Tales was first published - Installments while Uncle Jimmy was in the Tuberculosis Sanitarium in Deming.]

    But I came across an account from a man who'd been a youngster in the late-1860s-early-1870s who told an interesting story. Said a group of Mesilla/Pinos Altos Confederate Volunteers got together at his family ranch sometime in the late 1860s, including a lot of names you'd recognize. Jack Swilling and 'Colonel Snively' were among them. Everyone stayed for three days having themselves a hundred huddles and confabs.

    But he said during that time he must have heard this song a hundred times:

    The Good Old Rebel

    I am a good old rebel, that is just what I am
    For this fair land of freedom I do not care a damn
    I'm glad I fought against it but I only wished I'd won
    And I don't want a pardon for anything I've done

    I hate the constitution, this great republic too
    I hate the Freedman's Bureau in uniforms so blue
    I hate the nasty eagle with all the brag and fuss
    And the lying, thieving Yankees, I hate 'em worse and worse

    I hate the Yankee nation and everything they do
    I hate the Declaration of Independence too
    I hate the glorious Union, 'tis dripping with our blood
    And I hate their Yankee banner and I fought it all I could

    I followed old Marse Robert for four year near about
    Got wounded in three place and starved at Point Lookout
    I caught the rheumatism a-campin' in the snow
    But I caught a choice of Yankees and I wish I'd caught some more

    Three hundred thousand Yankees lie stiff in Southern dust
    We got three hundred thousand before they conquered us
    They died of Southern fever, Southern steel and shot
    And I wish it was three million instead of what we got

    I can't take up my musket and fight 'em now no more
    But I ain't goin' to love 'em now that's certain sure
    And I don't want no pardon for what I was and am
    And I won't be reconstructed and I don't give a damn


    The Headlight piece had several more stanzas I've never found anywhere since though I didn't know at the time they were unusual. I took these lyrics off the Internet. I thought at the time I'd make a copy of the article before I left Deming, but I was working on another project and it slipped my mind and I've never gotten around to going back in there and blinding myself squinting at a microfilm reader trying to find it again.

    Jack

  14. #14
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
    BS
    2,742
    980 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Quite a poem - no forgiveness from those quarters. It's my understanding the Civil War had more to do with high-level money lending and control of the US economy than it did about states' rights, slavery, etc. The financing issue is what got Lincoln capped at the end, not to mention 600,000 worth of Blue and Grey cannon fodder along the way. War pays well for those who lend money to combatents to buy supplies, especially if you can lend to both sides. It's always about the money.
    "The gods were smiling when you were born. Now they're laughing."​ Chinese fortune cookie

    Karmageddon
    : It's like, when everybody is sending off all those bad vibes, right? And then, like, the earth explodes and it's like, a serious bummer.







  15. #15

    Mar 2004
    New Mexico
    616
    7 times

    Re: Jacob Snively, Treasure, and Gold Rushes

    Quote Originally Posted by Springfield
    Quite a poem - no forgiveness from those quarters. It's my understanding the Civil War had more to do with high-level money lending and control of the US economy than it did about states' rights, slavery, etc. The financing issue is what got Lincoln capped at the end, not to mention 600,000 worth of Blue and Grey cannon fodder along the way. War pays well for those who lend money to combatents to buy supplies, especially if you can lend to both sides. It's always about the money.
    Yep. But the winners write the history books. Ask any school kid why that war was fought, what Lincoln's motives were, whether Lincoln could have avoided Fort Sumpter, whether Lincoln was a man to be admired, and you'll get a story that doesn't have much to do with truth but can tell you a lot about the way 'historoid' comes down to us. Got ourselves a historectomy on the Civil War, we did.

    To the victor go the spoils.

    Jack

 

 
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