"Colonial" Sites and Signs of the East Coast: Willow Gove, Pennsylvania
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  1. #1

    Oct 2007
    77
    10 times

    "Colonial" Sites and Signs of the East Coast: Willow Gove, Pennsylvania

    For those of you who enjoy treasure hunting on the east coast, you are VERY fortunate. There is no doubt that the east coast has just as many treasure rooms as any other areas that exist around the world.
    Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, has more treasure rooms per square mile than any place that I have ever seen!! These rooms are, literally, sprinkled throughout the land like none other!!
    The trick to finding these sites in Willow Grove is to first look for the Beechwood trees that were planted in order to "draw your attention" to that specific area. Find a Beechwood tree and the chances are pretty good that you will find treasure signs carved on these trees. Your only problem will be in your ability to decipher these signs.
    While in PA, I located many sites....ALL OF THEM were using Beechwood trees as an "alpha." One of the more important sites was located within a city park in Willow Grove (actually, 90% of the trerasure sites were located within city limits). Find a Beechwood tree and you have probably found an Alpha.
    Without a doubt, Willow Grove, PA, has dozens of treasure rooms that are still intact (treasure still exist in these rooms). These rooms date back to our Founding Fathers, and the treasures within these rooms are priceless!!!!!! Find one of these rooms and you are set for life, financially speaking!!!
    New Jersey also has its share of treasures. Same goes for New York, Connecticut, and so on.
    These east coast treasure rooms are more available, and are so available, to the treasure hunter than in any other State that I have been in. I suppose that this has to do with the building (the control) of America, and the fact that mines just don't exist there as they do in Arizona, or in the Caballos Mountains of New Mexico (and many other places in the U.S.). The signs that lead to mines are not the same signs that lead to treasure rooms.
    The Caballos Mountains in New Mexico are a funky set of of mountains. While everyone seeks the treasures "up high" in these mountains (where everyone can spy on them with telescopes), the true treasure rooms lie down by the river. I know, I've found them. These rooms are a mile to a mile and a half apart (and situated where no-one can spy on you).
    Good luck out there and be safe. Stay away from the "librarians" that don't know crap.



  2. #2
    pw
    Apr 2003
    New Mexico
    BS
    2,850
    1343 times

    Re: "Colonial" Sites and Signs of the East Coast: Willow Gove, Pennsylvania

    Quote Originally Posted by stilldign
    .... The Caballos Mountains in New Mexico are a funky set of of mountains. While everyone seeks the treasures "up high" in these mountains (where everyone can spy on them with telescopes), the true treasure rooms lie down by the river. I know, I've found them. These rooms are a mile to a mile and a half apart (and situated where no-one can spy on you)...
    Wrong again. By the way, speaking of telescopes, there's been one in a tavern in the town of _____, NM, focused on a certain rimrock area in the Caballos since at least the 1960's if not longer. It's there for a reason, and controlled by people who know some things. By the way, big talker, what did you recover from your 'treasure rooms'?
    ​Adios, amigos - it's been interesting.







  3. #3

    Jan 2006
    3

    Re: "Colonial" Sites and Signs of the East Coast: Willow Gove, Pennsylvania

    My guess is that telescope watches the ARK...
    Morgans Boy

  4. #4
    us
    Digaholic

    Sep 2006
    Lone Star State
    1,696
    19 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting

    Re: "Colonial" Sites and Signs of the East Coast: Willow Gove, Pennsylvania

    Life Span: 150 -200 years
    http://garden.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Beech

    Life Span: Longest lived - 320 years, Average:250 years
    http://www.leeds.gov.uk/fol/species.html

    Life Span: 100 - 200 years
    http://cfs.nrcan.gc.ca/subsite/maritimetrees/beech

    Long lived S/S plausible? Possibly. Now that I have supported the life span issue, I would also like to see pictures of your treasures. Possibly old excavted sites. Please tell me that you documented every marker right to the cache, and the cache itself, with images to preserve it's history, before looting them.

    I am not the only one who appreciates the insight you have offered into other peoples' problems. Sometimes people want to see evidence that the wisdom you offer is productive for yourself. I have seen your posts on other forums, if in fact you are the same stilldign. However, I also realize the boat floats both ways. Anyone could take pictures off the web to offer up as evidence to shut the mouths of the multitudes. One would put himself out on a limb to commit such a foolish act. I will not believe you to be one of those fools.

    I am dying to see someone's, ANYONE's, loot and trail marker documentation with booty at the end......just me.
    My detector is a needle finder; The world is my haystack.
    =====================================
    Think with a clear conscience or you will not be able to speak with one.
    ==============================================

  5. #5
    us
    Apr 2010
    18

    Re: "Colonial" Sites and Signs of the East Coast: Willow Gove, Pennsylvania

    Quote Originally Posted by stilldign
    For those of you who enjoy treasure hunting on the east coast, you are VERY fortunate. There is no doubt that the east coast has just as many treasure rooms as any other areas that exist around the world.
    Willow Grove, Pennsylvania, has more treasure rooms per square mile than any place that I have ever seen!! These rooms are, literally, sprinkled throughout the land like none other!!
    The trick to finding these sites in Willow Grove is to first look for the Beechwood trees that were planted in order to "draw your attention" to that specific area. Find a Beechwood tree and the chances are pretty good that you will find treasure signs carved on these trees. Your only problem will be in your ability to decipher these signs.
    While in PA, I located many sites....ALL OF THEM were using Beechwood trees as an "alpha." One of the more important sites was located within a city park in Willow Grove (actually, 90% of the trerasure sites were located within city limits). Find a Beechwood tree and you have probably found an Alpha.
    Without a doubt, Willow Grove, PA, has dozens of treasure rooms that are still intact (treasure still exist in these rooms). These rooms date back to our Founding Fathers, and the treasures within these rooms are priceless!!!!!! Find one of these rooms and you are set for life, financially speaking!!!
    New Jersey also has its share of treasures. Same goes for New York, Connecticut, and so on.
    These east coast treasure rooms are more available, and are so available, to the treasure hunter than in any other State that I have been in. I suppose that this has to do with the building (the control) of America, and the fact that mines just don't exist there as they do in Arizona, or in the Caballos Mountains of New Mexico (and many other places in the U.S.). The signs that lead to mines are not the same signs that lead to treasure rooms.
    The Caballos Mountains in New Mexico are a funky set of of mountains. While everyone seeks the treasures "up high" in these mountains (where everyone can spy on them with telescopes), the true treasure rooms lie down by the river. I know, I've found them. These rooms are a mile to a mile and a half apart (and situated where no-one can spy on you).
    Good luck out there and be safe. Stay away from the "librarians" that don't know crap.


    Wow! That's totally awesome! I'm still pretty new to treasure hunting, but I've been reading all the posts here and I think I'm getting the hang of looking for all the symbols and stuff. How many treasure rooms have you found so far?

 

 

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