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  1. #76
    pt
    Sep 2014
    2,060
    5249 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Here's another old beauty, carved by the master, Ricard L. Powel, March 27, 1889. No, it's not Masonic pyramid numerology, it's corner 4 of the Globe Democrat Lode mining claim, mineral survey no. 787. That big dashed line on the aerial is the major gold-producing trend in the area - the Pacific group. George Hearst (father of William Randolph Hearst) owned most of it. That major road below is the old narrow gauge railroad grade (now Radio Tower Road).

    Nice work, Ricard - more fun to find than alcaps.

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    Last edited by sdcfia; Mar 11, 2018 at 09:16 AM.
    "The illusion of freedom will continue as long as itís profitable to continue the illusion. At the point where the illusion becomes too expensive to maintain, they will just take down the scenery, they will pull back the curtains, they will move the tables and chairs out of the way and you will see the brick wall at the back of the theater." Frank Zappa

  2. #77

    May 2016
    156
    223 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Very nice tetrahedron pyramid. Don't see many of those.
    sdcfia likes this.

  3. #78
    pt
    Sep 2014
    2,060
    5249 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Quote Originally Posted by Benjamin Gates View Post
    Very nice tetrahedron pyramid. Don't see many of those.
    Those surveyors sought rocks that were hard and had flat surfaces to carve on, plus had a distinctive shape (if one could be found) that was easy to spot. They also frequently built a mound of stones nearby (knee-high) to help mark the spot. The same surveyor carved the stone shown in Post #72. It's also pyramidal in shape, but not as nice as the one in Post #76.
    "The illusion of freedom will continue as long as itís profitable to continue the illusion. At the point where the illusion becomes too expensive to maintain, they will just take down the scenery, they will pull back the curtains, they will move the tables and chairs out of the way and you will see the brick wall at the back of the theater." Frank Zappa

  4. #79
    us
    Nov 2011
    Purgatory
    Pulsegarrettmasterpro2rabbit'sfoot
    805
    1651 times
    Lol , I 've seen surveyors use other peoples markers before, they liked using some of the shapes that marked out the old sites because they stand out and are recognizable. They just didn't know what they were originally, because of lack of further knowledge. The mining sites have always had a few that they repositioned or used for corner markers. I've seen them as well even in the region my own claims are. Some appear masonic, whether the surveyor was a mason or not would be difficult to say for sure. There are many freemason surveyors, quite a few that are high up in the lodges, you can find that by searching around, it's no secret.

    I've seen obelisks used a few times as well for property boundaries some even dated in the late 1800's. Doesn't mean that was the origin of the marker.
    elh likes this.

  5. #80
    pt
    Sep 2014
    2,060
    5249 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Quote Originally Posted by Quinoa View Post
    Lol , I 've seen surveyors use other peoples markers before, they liked using some of the shapes that marked out the old sites because they stand out and are recognizable. They just didn't know what they were originally, because of lack of further knowledge. The mining sites have always had a few that they repositioned or used for corner markers. I've seen them as well even in the region my own claims are. Some appear masonic, whether the surveyor was a mason or not would be difficult to say for sure. There are many freemason surveyors, quite a few that are high up in the lodges, you can find that by searching around, it's no secret.

    I've seen obelisks used a few times as well for property boundaries some even dated in the late 1800's. Doesn't mean that was the origin of the marker.
    I'd like to see photos of some of those "other peoples" markers that the surveyors were ignorant of (and why those others' markers happened to be found at corners of 1500'x600', more or less, mining claims).

    Your theories are of course not totally impossible, I guess, but it's tough to fantasize what you're saying without something to look at. Reminds me of the guy here who bought a piece of property some years back because he found a carved stone there one day and was sure it was a "treasure marker". It was just an old property corner. At least he believed in his idea enough to dig a large number of holes to check it out. Have you made any effort to validate your ancient mine theories?
    "The illusion of freedom will continue as long as itís profitable to continue the illusion. At the point where the illusion becomes too expensive to maintain, they will just take down the scenery, they will pull back the curtains, they will move the tables and chairs out of the way and you will see the brick wall at the back of the theater." Frank Zappa

  6. #81
    us
    Nov 2011
    Purgatory
    Pulsegarrettmasterpro2rabbit'sfoot
    805
    1651 times
    Not sure I have many pictures of them , I may have one tombstone shaped a surveyor I know took back to his office that had survey carvings on it. He told me they liked using those tombstone shapes, haha. Well fair enough, one Egyptian meaning for the tombstone was "boundary" as well as an information stone , so the surveyors are re-using them in a correct manner anyways.

    Effort in my ancient mining theories? What do you think? Why do you think I would have purchased a hard rock claim for 8K a couple years ago that had "spanish/ancient" markers on it in a place away from where the audit was supposed to be? I put my money where my mouth is and was betting on figuring out the markers and finding the covered one there. It's a long drive to it from where I live, last year there were area closures due to fires, didn't get up there at all. It gets totally snowed in from about Oct 1- June 1, and there's always a bunch of blow downs across the 2 track that goes to it you have to chainsaw out.

    Kind of a pain just trying to do something legal as far treasure goes. So I've only spend a couple days up there taking photos and running a detector since when I first bought it. I'll likely find it this year, I figured out where it should be located based on finding a couple hidden mines last year somewhere else on non claimable land. I figured out what to look for on the mines now. In the mean time, I'll keep marking caches where surveyors haven't been that have some of that "survey marker" stuff around them, and "st. elmo's fire" blazing out.
    sdcfia, weekender and Barton like this.

  7. #82
    pt
    Sep 2014
    2,060
    5249 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Well, good luck with what you're doing. I know what you mean about tough access due to weather. I remember getting 6" of snow on July 4th weekend up in SW Colorado when I was working in a mine up there. Winters, of course, were long and confining. That's why I moved to SW New Mexico - life is easier here.
    Quinoa likes this.
    "The illusion of freedom will continue as long as itís profitable to continue the illusion. At the point where the illusion becomes too expensive to maintain, they will just take down the scenery, they will pull back the curtains, they will move the tables and chairs out of the way and you will see the brick wall at the back of the theater." Frank Zappa

  8. #83
    us
    Nov 2011
    Purgatory
    Pulsegarrettmasterpro2rabbit'sfoot
    805
    1651 times
    Thankyou for that, Steve. I'll will give an update later in the summer on what's going with that one if you shoot me a reminder. It's all legal for the most part. There were some cache markers there as well, but they had a line over to the mine spot I'll be looking at and digging out. Caches are illegal on mining claims as well, "no loose ore or bullion". Hard to get rich legally.
    Here was the 2 track into it in 2016, it will be worse this year, I'll probably just back pack my gear into it, only a half mile in or so from a gravel road. Many of those trees are too big for me to safely cut out, let alone move out of the way afterwards. Click image for larger version. 

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    weekender and sdcfia like this.

  9. #84
    pt
    Sep 2014
    2,060
    5249 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Quote Originally Posted by Quinoa View Post
    Thankyou for that, Steve. I'll will give an update later in the summer on what's going with that one if you shoot me a reminder. It's all legal for the most part. There were some cache markers there as well, but they had a line over to the mine spot I'll be looking at and digging out. Caches are illegal on mining claims as well, "no loose ore or bullion". Hard to get rich legally.
    Here was the 2 track into it in 2016, it will be worse this year, I'll probably just back pack my gear into it, only a half mile in or so from a gravel road. Many of those trees are too big for me to safely cut out, let alone move out of the way afterwards.
    It's a challenging situation on several levels. From your post, I assume your mining claim lies on public land, as opposed to being a patented claim (ie deeded property). That being the case, your target being "not in place ore", allows you only one "legal" recovery option - filing a treasure trove claim on top of the mining claim. I personally would not pursue that route.

    It depends on how much effort you intend to put into the work on your claim whether or not to deal with the two-track. The amount of work needed for your recovery efforts are likely to be far greater than what you're anticipating - it always seems to be that way. If you can only manage a couple weeks a year to work on this, I guess a half-mile walk in and out every day is manageable as long as your gear is portable. Clearing that two-track would be nice, but could burn up an entire season. Tough decision. Oh well, keeping it obstructed will certainly discourage strangers on ATVs from exploring it.

    The time restraints and remoteness of your site reminds me of another TNet poster's dilemma from a few years ago: The Lost Carson Mine
    Last edited by sdcfia; Mar 14, 2018 at 08:29 AM.
    "The illusion of freedom will continue as long as itís profitable to continue the illusion. At the point where the illusion becomes too expensive to maintain, they will just take down the scenery, they will pull back the curtains, they will move the tables and chairs out of the way and you will see the brick wall at the back of the theater." Frank Zappa

  10. #85
    pt
    Sep 2014
    2,060
    5249 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Here's another example of an old wooden mining corner post. Looking at its condition may be instructive to those of you who like to estimate the age of artifacts you find in your searches. This was originally a five-foot long pine 4x4 post, buried halfway in the ground in 1884 amid a mound of stones at 7200 feet elevation in a pine-oak forested area that receives about 20 inches of precipitation annually. Only about two feet survived and it was heavily dry-rotted after being in the elements the past 134 years.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    "The illusion of freedom will continue as long as itís profitable to continue the illusion. At the point where the illusion becomes too expensive to maintain, they will just take down the scenery, they will pull back the curtains, they will move the tables and chairs out of the way and you will see the brick wall at the back of the theater." Frank Zappa

  11. #86
    us
    Nov 2011
    Purgatory
    Pulsegarrettmasterpro2rabbit'sfoot
    805
    1651 times
    I don't know if I want to show things that are too close to home base. I can maybe show some stuff up by my claim, will get up there in a couple months. Eh, maybe I can show something kinda interesting.
    A little spot I found following markers below what I would call an ancient mining site in some very steep and rough back country last year. Looks like a turtle or fish/whale and mouth my buddies sticking his head into. I pulled one possible plug, and this was what was left. Not sure if it's real plug or not. Kind of an overcut in the top right corner of it where the block is cut past a right angle . Should be interesting, kind of gets yur blood flowing a bit, I'll visit it this summer. There's other markers nearby , and it's pegged on bearings from other further away ones. There's an A frame or pyramid rock out in front the the outcrop. Probably won't show much more on it. Tough spot to pull, but I have ideas how to get that brick out. Probably empty anyways, right?
    Attachment 1591224

    Oh one more addition, an obelisk and maybe set of owl ears on the ridgeline above the suspected mining site that was way up the ridge. I hiked half the day getting up near it, not showing any others pictures right now. I had to rest 2 days after coming down and out of there. I'm not 20 any more. Pretty cool stuff I guess if you are into it.
    Last edited by Quinoa; May 17, 2018 at 09:15 PM.
    weekender and Mark60 like this.

  12. #87
    us
    Nov 2011
    Purgatory
    Pulsegarrettmasterpro2rabbit'sfoot
    805
    1651 times
    Oh, can you see the U shape at the base of the obelisk half way up and how it was "set" to never move. Not quite natural.

    edit : "Tongue and groove" I guess you could call it. Should be pretty easy to see. I could circle it if you don't see it right away. It's on the left side of the obelisk.

    So how old would that be? Tongue and groove stacked rocks/obelisks are not going to be looked at as very natural when people start asking too many questions.
    Last edited by Quinoa; May 17, 2018 at 09:15 PM.
    weekender and Mark60 like this.

  13. #88
    pt
    Sep 2014
    2,060
    5249 times
    The facts behind the factoids
    Came across an old unpatented mining claim corner yesterday. Nothing remarkable about it except this artifact screwed very tightly into the ground next to the mound of stones. Sure, it's not all that old (maybe a hundred years), but an interesting find.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    "The illusion of freedom will continue as long as itís profitable to continue the illusion. At the point where the illusion becomes too expensive to maintain, they will just take down the scenery, they will pull back the curtains, they will move the tables and chairs out of the way and you will see the brick wall at the back of the theater." Frank Zappa

  14. #89
    us
    Nov 2011
    Purgatory
    Pulsegarrettmasterpro2rabbit'sfoot
    805
    1651 times
    Broken auger for probing/ taking soil samples? We used them a little for testing spots for placer, it will pull the deeper soil up to the top.

 

 
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