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  1. #1
    us
    May 2009
    West Virginia
    Goldmaxx, Compass GSP, Garrett Infinium
    26

    Found a square nail that read quarter and wouldnt disc out...

    Thats cause this sucker is solid brass! Sorry about no picture, but looks like

    a typical big square nail, 3 3/4 inches long w/ a half inch head. Seems like

    the standard use for a nail this big would command it to be iron. Any ideas?

    Found it way out in a field w/ civil war activity. Thanks for lookin, Joey
    If I don't have time to do it right, how do I have time to do it twice?

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  3. #2
    Charter Member
    us
    Oct 2007
    Summit County, CO
    White's DFX, White's Classic 1 Coinmaster
    5,261
    940 times
    No pic? 'Thanks for lookin!?' Yeah buddy, thanks for postin.
    Just like Texas in 1880.

  4. #3
    us
    Relic Hunter & Raconteur Extraordinaire

    Mar 2011
    Shenandoah Valley
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    Quote Originally Posted by snaps View Post
    Thats cause this sucker is solid brass! Sorry about no picture, but looks like

    a typical big square nail, 3 3/4 inches long w/ a half inch head. Seems like

    the standard use for a nail this big would command it to be iron. Any ideas?

    Found it way out in a field w/ civil war activity. Thanks for lookin, Joey
    Don't need a pic to respond to this. Nails fool a lot of detectors, regardless of what I've heard. They will often read high on both my MXT Pro and my T2SE. I also have an AT Pro, but have not used it enough on land to make a determination. If the nail is bent at all, that makes it worse, but I've had plenty of small straight ones ring high too. You're not alone.
    "A land without ruins is a land without memories -- a land without memories is a land without history." ~ Rev. Abram Joseph Ryan, Poet Laureate of the Confederacy

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    Proud great-great grandson of three Confederate soldiers: John Meredith Crutchfield who served with the 60th Virginia, Maurice Coffey, & John McGann who both served with the 51st Virginia. Grandpa Crutchfield and Grandpa Coffey were both wounded and both served time in Yankee prisons.

  5. #4
    us
    "Is that a Geiger Counter?"

    Feb 2006
    South Central Upstate NY in the foothills of the headlands
    '72 RS Kit/Musketeer Advantage with 8" & 10" DD coils/Fisher F75se with 11" DD & 6.5" concentric coils/Sunray FX-1 Probe/Black Widows/Rattler/F-Point/Merlin SXL Pinpointers
    3,687
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    Metal Detecting
    Boats were fastened with brass (and copper) nails.
    America was founded by tough hell-raisers. Rugged citizens who evaded taxes, spoke strongly against tyranny, grew tobacco, brewed beer, distilled spirits, and smuggled weapons. And it will be saved by those same types of citizens.

  6. #5
    us
    May 2009
    West Virginia
    Goldmaxx, Compass GSP, Garrett Infinium
    26
    Oh, you have never dug a square nail before, so you cannot "imagine" it.
    You cant "imagine" this one with a crusty green patina because its made of brass not iron.
    wow, Im glad you dont dig nails, your a better man than I !
    If I don't have time to do it right, how do I have time to do it twice?

  7. #6
    us
    May 2009
    West Virginia
    Goldmaxx, Compass GSP, Garrett Infinium
    26

    Thanks Charlie...

    Never thought of that.
    If I don't have time to do it right, how do I have time to do it twice?

  8. #7
    us
    May 2009
    West Virginia
    Goldmaxx, Compass GSP, Garrett Infinium
    26
    yea bent iron nails are a real politician, fool ya everytime! thanks for reply
    If I don't have time to do it right, how do I have time to do it twice?

  9. #8
    Charter Member
    us
    I Often Find Myself Killing Time Looking For What Time Has Killed!

    Feb 2009
    Morehead City / Newport NC
    Minelab Explorer Se Pro
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    If you get old enough some are made of bronze.By the way does it look like any of these in this hand full?
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    Them Colonials​Can't Hide Nowhere Now!

  10. #9
    Educator

    Feb 2006
    Occupied CSA (Richmond VA)
    White's 6000, Nautilus DMC-1, Minelab
    3,325
    2181 times
    Relic Hunting
    Just speaking up to give you additional confirmation of what Charlie P. told you. Brass/bronze/copper square-nails were manufactured primarily for Maritime use, because they are so much more resistant to corrosion (especially saltwater corrosion) than iron/steel nails. Therefore, brass/bronze/copper nails tend to be found mostly in Seacoast areas, though they're also found in some quantity near "navigable" rivers.

    My early years of civil war relic-digging were spent in Atlanta Campaign sites. In all those years I never dug so much as a single brass/bronze/copper square-nail. Then in the early 1980s I spent some time digging near Fort Fisher, NC (Wilmington area) ...and was stunned by how many brass/copper square-nails nails I dug. I asked my local (Wilmington) digger-buddy about them, and he explained their Maritime use (boats, ships, beach-shacks, docks, etc). He also exlained why I was digging lots-&-lots of copper sheetmetal. It was used to sheath boat-hulls, because in addition to being resistant to saltwater corrosion, copper is toxic to barnacles and algae, thereby preventing them from growing on the boat's hull.

  11. #10
    Charter Member
    us
    I Often Find Myself Killing Time Looking For What Time Has Killed!

    Feb 2009
    Morehead City / Newport NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCannonballGuy View Post
    Just speaking up to give you additional confirmation of what Charlie P. told you. Brass/bronze/copper square-nails were manufactured primarily for Maritime use, because they are so much more resistant to corrosion (especially saltwater corrosion) than iron/steel nails. Therefore, brass/bronze/copper nails tend to be found mostly in Seacoast areas, though they're also found in some quantity near "navigable" rivers.

    My early years of civil war relic-digging were spent in Atlanta Campaign sites. In all those years I never dug so much as a single brass/bronze/copper square-nail. Then in the early 1980s I spent some time digging near Fort Fisher, NC (Wilmington area) ...and was stunned by how many brass/copper square-nails nails I dug. I asked my local (Wilmington) digger-buddy about them, and he explained their Maritime use (boats, ships, beach-shacks, docks, etc). He also exlained why I was digging lots-&-lots of copper sheetmetal. It was used to sheath boat-hulls, because in addition to being resistant to saltwater corrosion, copper is toxic to barnacles and algae, thereby preventing them from growing on the boat's hull.
    Very true,& is why we still paint the bottoms of boats now & days with copper base paints.Below are some of what CB was telling you about,just a few handy pieces I had inside.They also use lead to patch holes in the hulls which in the pic. below you'll see.Common on very early ships & small boats.Also added a link to see as well that they did use iron spikes & nails to..
    Structural Components
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    Last edited by timekiller; Mar 27, 2012 at 11:28 PM.
    Them Colonials​Can't Hide Nowhere Now!

  12. #11
    Charter Member
    CANE FIELD BANDITS and IRON BRIGADE MEMBER

    Jun 2006
    Moonlight and Magnolias
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    Timekiller,

    Is that a piece of lead that was used for patching a hull? We have found some BIG bronze nails in our Colonial field here, and many, many pieces of lead that were thin, and had nail holes in them.

    Best Wishes,

    Buckles
    2014 CaneField Bandits Totals:
    Three Seated Half Dimes: 1842-O, 1848-O and 1857
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    Blacksmith-Forged Picket Pin
    1941 Walking Liberty Half Dollar
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    Any relics, coins, or other items appearing in my finds signatures were found on PRIVATE PROPERTY with total consent and permission from the owners of said property.

  13. #12
    Charter Member
    us
    I Often Find Myself Killing Time Looking For What Time Has Killed!

    Feb 2009
    Morehead City / Newport NC
    Minelab Explorer Se Pro
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    Yes it is,I've seen & held hull sheathing from old ships.But you have to remember lead was also used on homes roof flashing,etc.But I hunt water sites mainly old small ports/docks.A good way to tell the difference is hull sheathing is usually thicker also may contain tar resin,hair,or clothe imprints.Took a couple more shots this morning in day light so you can see the imprints of where the clothe was & how thick these pieces are.I'll add you a site that talks about hull sheathing so you can see what I'm saying.
    http://www.melfisher.org/pdf/Lead_Sh..._Margarita.pdf
    Take Care,
    Pete,
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    Last edited by timekiller; Mar 28, 2012 at 09:04 AM.
    Them Colonials​Can't Hide Nowhere Now!

  14. #13
    us
    da book worm--researcher

    Feb 2007
    callahan,fl
    delta 4000 / ace 250 - used BH and many others too
    14,252
    625 times
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    copper sheathing for hulls was a common way to prevent sea moss (algie) and barnacles from attaching to the wooden ship hulls --it also prevented sea worms from boring holes into the wooden hulls causing them to leak. -- bronze and copper spikes and nails were also much more corrision resistant than iron or steel in salt water uses. -- if one is close to a sea port area its not uncommon to find them in homes and other uses as folks often used what was best suited to the local area for build supplies and often "maritime"supply's were often "pinched" for private use --thats why the british navy had "broad arrow" marks on british govt naval items to be able to "prove" it was govt property if someone stole it, for "private use"

    while lead was used for patching hulls -- in the very old days it was used instead of copper for hull sheathing --if one finds old lead sheathing one likely found a very old possible treasure shipwreck.
    Last edited by ivan salis; Mar 28, 2012 at 09:24 AM.

  15. #14
    us
    May 2009
    West Virginia
    Goldmaxx, Compass GSP, Garrett Infinium
    26
    Time killer, thanks and yea it looks just like the square nail in lower left corner only this one is 3 3/4 inches long with a half inch head-as big a square
    nail as ive ever seen-iron,brass or other wise
    If I don't have time to do it right, how do I have time to do it twice?

  16. #15
    us
    May 2009
    West Virginia
    Goldmaxx, Compass GSP, Garrett Infinium
    26
    cannonball guy, great info thanks! and as you only dug these nails near water, Im wondering how this nail ended up in a union camp in Md. nowhere near water
    If I don't have time to do it right, how do I have time to do it twice?

  17. #16
    Charter Member
    us
    I Often Find Myself Killing Time Looking For What Time Has Killed!

    Feb 2009
    Morehead City / Newport NC
    Minelab Explorer Se Pro
    3,507
    409 times
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    Banner Finds (2)
    Quote Originally Posted by snaps View Post
    Time killer, thanks and yea it looks just like the square nail in lower left corner only this one is 3 3/4 inches long with a half inch head-as big a square
    nail as ive ever seen-iron,brass or other wise
    No problem,I took you a couple more shots.If it's the smaller piece in the lower left your talking about then it's brass as you can see in the pics. the two different colors.The smaller piece has a whiteish look cause brass is a mix of zinc & copper so the zinc is giving that look.If it the other type then it is bronze,all bronze items I dig or find always have the dark smooth chocolate look as it's made from copper & tin & always for me comes up or out holding up & looking better even when it's older (my spoon mold is a good example of that).The last pic. will be some iron type just to show you they get bigger.
    Take Care,
    Pete
    http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/to...mold-find.html
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    Them Colonials​Can't Hide Nowhere Now!

  18. #17
    Charter Member
    CANE FIELD BANDITS and IRON BRIGADE MEMBER

    Jun 2006
    Moonlight and Magnolias
    Fisher F75, Fisher 1266-X and Tesoro Silver ÁMax
    14,625
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    Pete, that is exactly the type of lead we are finding in our field. I have dug around 25lbs of lead so far, and I'm sure my digging partner has dug as much. This is a great thread. At some point, I will post some of the bronze nails I have been digging. Man, they sound so good when you get the coil over one. The kind we are finding are thick and 4 to 5 inches in length, though many have been bent by the plow.

    -Buckles

 

 

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