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  1. #1
    Brasscock

    Best Strong

    Hi
    Can anyone tell me what best strong means on the back of brass buttons was it the name of a manufacturer?
    I recently found a plain brass button with best strong inscribed on the back it looks fairly old, thanks.





  2. #2
    dugupfinds

    Re: Best Strong

    Hi,

    Welcome to Tnet from across the pond.

    I think its a brand name rather than a manufacturer.

    Have you got photos?

  3. #3
    us
    Ben from NH, the Z means nothing

    Dec 2004
    Brentwood, NH
    White's Classic SL White's Surf P.I.
    6,643
    6035 times

    Re: Best Strong

    Welcome. A quick google search of "best strong" turned up this site: http://beaversmill.ieasysite.com/new_home_page_008.htm The description sounds the same, which (if they are correct) places the age from 1800-1830. Does it look the same? And is the writing "fancy old English" as they describe?
    Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain

  4. #4
    Brasscock

    Re: Best Strong

    Thanks I,ve added a picture I found this on Tramore beach County Waterford Ireland.There were many ships wrecked in this bay the most famous being the Seahorse in 1816 story below.

    The Story of the Seahorse.
    The Seahorse was a sailing transport ship. It was built in London in 1784. A vessel of 350 tons, it was constructed of Irish Oak. It was originally a three deck, three masted, fighting vessel commanded by Lord Nelson in 1799. On her last voyage from Ramsgate in England to Cork in Ireland she was commanded by a Captain Gibbs, with an Irishman, John Sullivan as first mate and a crew of 17 men. On board were 16 officers, 287 soldiers, 33 women and 38 children.

    The Seahorse left Ramsgate on the 25th January 1816, in calm weather and anchored overnight in the Downs. The following morning she weighed anchor and with light breezes from the North / North West she was off Dungeness about midnight. Two days later, on the 28th January she was off Lizards Point with the wind blowing from the South sending her past the Wolf Rock, between Lands End and St. Mary’s on the Scilly Isles and out across St. George’s Channel into the Atlantic.

    On the 29th January a strong South/South Easterly wind sprung up and by 4 pm Ballycotton Island was sited about 12 miles away. As the wind increased and the seas rose Captain Gibbs headed for Kinsale Lights to sail down the coast to Cork.John Sullivan, the first mate, was the only man aboard who knew the South coast.Due to the poor visibility it was impossible for the Captain to fix his position and the ship was blown Eastwards. When no lights appeared, John Sullivan climbed the rigging to view the land. A fierce wind gust tore him from the rigging and smashed him to the deck. He died 3 hours later.

    About 5am on the 30th January Minehead appeared . The gale was now severe, and the vessel was drifting fast, and though Hook Lighthouse was visible, it was not possible to sail around Brownstown Head, and about midday with the wind and sea still increasing the Seahorse, battered and helpless grounded in Tramore Bay less than a mile from the shore and safety.

    Only 30 people survived none of them were women or children.

    Later there was a monument erected in their memories. Because of erosion their remains had to be moved to a safer place. The monument is now on the Doneraile Walk, which affords a spectacular view of Tramore Bay, where many souls lost their lives to the sea on that dreadful night in 1816

  5. #5
    Brasscock

    Re: Best Strong

    Heres the front if anyone can help.



  6. #6
    us
    Celtic Treasure Hunter

    Apr 2005
    Southeastern Ireland
    1,253
    19 times
    Banner Finds (1)

    Re: Best Strong

    Quote Originally Posted by Brasscock
    Thanks I,ve added a picture I found this on Tramore beach County Waterford Ireland.There were many ships wrecked in this bay the most famous being the Seahorse in 1816 story below.

    The Story of the Seahorse.
    The Seahorse was a sailing transport ship. It was built in London in 1784. A vessel of 350 tons, it was constructed of Irish Oak. It was originally a three deck, three masted, fighting vessel commanded by Lord Nelson in 1799. On her last voyage from Ramsgate in England to Cork in Ireland she was commanded by a Captain Gibbs, with an Irishman, John Sullivan as first mate and a crew of 17 men. On board were 16 officers, 287 soldiers, 33 women and 38 children.

    The Seahorse left Ramsgate on the 25th January 1816, in calm weather and anchored overnight in the Downs. The following morning she weighed anchor and with light breezes from the North / North West she was off Dungeness about midnight. Two days later, on the 28th January she was off Lizards Point with the wind blowing from the South sending her past the Wolf Rock, between Lands End and St. Mary’s on the Scilly Isles and out across St. George’s Channel into the Atlantic.

    On the 29th January a strong South/South Easterly wind sprung up and by 4 pm Ballycotton Island was sited about 12 miles away. As the wind increased and the seas rose Captain Gibbs headed for Kinsale Lights to sail down the coast to Cork.John Sullivan, the first mate, was the only man aboard who knew the South coast.Due to the poor visibility it was impossible for the Captain to fix his position and the ship was blown Eastwards. When no lights appeared, John Sullivan climbed the rigging to view the land. A fierce wind gust tore him from the rigging and smashed him to the deck. He died 3 hours later.

    About 5am on the 30th January Minehead appeared . The gale was now severe, and the vessel was drifting fast, and though Hook Lighthouse was visible, it was not possible to sail around Brownstown Head, and about midday with the wind and sea still increasing the Seahorse, battered and helpless grounded in Tramore Bay less than a mile from the shore and safety.

    Only 30 people survived none of them were women or children.

    Later there was a monument erected in their memories. Because of erosion their remains had to be moved to a safer place. The monument is now on the Doneraile Walk, which affords a spectacular view of Tramore Bay, where many souls lost their lives to the sea on that dreadful night in 1816
    You found that in Tramore? I'm out there at the beach about every second weekend detecting. I never see anyone else detecting there. Do you live in Waterford? I'm in Ferrybank.


    Cheers,

    DJ
    The only ones for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the sky.

  7. #7
    us
    Celtic Treasure Hunter

    Apr 2005
    Southeastern Ireland
    1,253
    19 times
    Banner Finds (1)

    Re: Best Strong

    BTW Brasscock, ever had a pint at the Brasscock on the Dunmore Road?
    The only ones for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the sky.

 

 

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