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Thread: Found brick pit? Need help please

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  1. #31
    us
    It's all good!!

    Jan 2006
    oklahoma
    Tesoro Vaquero, Tejon
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    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    After reading that you found a spike, this suddenly turned into a remake of Oak Island. Hope you get it figured out.

  2. #32
    Charter Member
    us
    Tommy

    Dec 2015
    Ann Arbor
    Equinox 800
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    Honorable Mentions (2)
    Be fun to investigate
    Oddjob and Reanm8er like this.
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  3. #33

    Feb 2017
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    Well that could be the shitter (excuse my french) or it could be a mount for a wellhead, imho. In the latter case you would find a pipe rather soon.

    In either case it is not very old since I think I see hollow cinder blocks.

    On second thought: dig from the ouside not standing in, just in case its a real well only overed with some sheet metal or rotten wood and earth above it.

    Greets

    Namxat
    john845 likes this.

  4. #34

    Jan 2019
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    namxat

    Nice catch on the hollow bricks/blocks. I thought for a minute that would narrow down a date. However, I did a little research and it appears that various forms of hollow bricks/blocks go as far back as the 1700s. This pdf link is to an article that covers the history of building blocks with chapters nine through eleven (pages 274-357) focusing specifically on hollow bricks/blocks. The attached image is from one of those chapters and shows hollow bricks from 1849. Of course the ones in the mystery pit are a little different, but with a little more research someone might be able to date them more accurately.

    http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/4248/1/DX094368.pdf


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    namxat and EK GOLD like this.

  5. #35

    Aug 2012
    RD1000, GSSI Profiler EMP-400. GPZ 14 & 19
    4,329
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    not too deep, small ledge to lay boards on, good distance from a structure.

    Shine hide would be my guess.
    MCX likes this.
    Quote Originally Posted by G.I.B. View Post
    I'm not an Idiot Whisperer. I can't help you any further with the math.

  6. #36
    us
    Jun 2013
    East Tennessee
    6,843
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    Well even though the Thread is nearly 4 years old, I will chime in and say that it was likely a rainwater catch basin to water the cattle. I hope you have placed a cover over it or a fence around it to keep anyone from falling into the hole. Sure, it is not deep but stepping into it, a person could be seriously injured or killed if they hit their' head on the bricks.
    Reanm8er likes this.

  7. #37
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    Bill

    Sep 2013
    Erie Pennsylvania
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    This thing has been driving me nuts as to what it was. The 2 main clues are that it was directly next to the cow trail far from the barn and house. It was dry stacked so does that mean that it didn't need strength to support something?

  8. #38
    us
    Jun 2013
    East Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock22 View Post
    This thing has been driving me nuts as to what it was. The 2 main clues are that it was directly next to the cow trail far from the barn and house. It was dry stacked so does that mean that it didn't need strength to support something?
    That is likely the case! Most often you see wells and rainwater catch basins with dry stacked bricks or stones because folks did not want any contamination from mortar mix or concrete. Anything needed to hold the bricks or rocks in place while laying them, was usually red clay mud. Once done, they would let the red clay dry for quite some time to ensure it set well and once set, the red clay would usually stay in place for many years.
    Reanm8er likes this.

  9. #39

    Jan 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rock22 View Post
    The dirt in it was hard packed so it was there for a long time. It was not dark so it shows no burning. I am sifting all of the dirt now and have found one large spike so far and nothing else yet. No bottles or any other large trash items were in it. The only reason I found it was because I saw a small part of a brick sticking up out of the dirt. I removed about 30 bricks from it and I now realize that they were all across the top of the pit and not the sides. My guess as to the time period is the 1930s. I will be sifting it more today so I will update.
    Reminder ...

    "I removed about 30 bricks from it and I now realize that they were all across the top of the pit and not the sides"

  10. #40

    Jan 2019
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    When I first tapped into this discussion I automatically assumed that what we were looking at was a finished project of some sort. But now I'm wondering if maybe it was a work in progress that never got completed such as the foundation for a Smokehouse, Furnace, Fireplace, etc?

  11. #41

    Feb 2017
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    526 times
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sodabob View Post
    namxat

    Nice catch on the hollow bricks/blocks. I thought for a minute that would narrow down a date. However, I did a little research and it appears that various forms of hollow bricks/blocks go as far back as the 1700s. This pdf link is to an article that covers the history of building blocks with chapters nine through eleven (pages 274-357) focusing specifically on hollow bricks/blocks. The attached image is from one of those chapters and shows hollow bricks from 1849. Of course the ones in the mystery pit are a little different, but with a little more research someone might be able to date them more accurately.

    http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/4248/1/DX094368.pdf


    Click image for larger version. 

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    Thats the cool thing about tresurenet, you learn something everyday. I read this and also googled and found ballast bricks which were hollow. So, I take it back. Could be older.

    If there was a structure once or event temporary it could be just a rainwater catchment for the roof. But basically I am out of wits what it could be else besides the possibilities already mentioned.

    Greets Namxat

  12. #42
    us
    Bill

    Sep 2013
    Erie Pennsylvania
    Tesoro Tejon
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    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Still a mystery but shine hide seems like the fun thing to believe that it was. Just an odd shape/size in my opinion to allow animals to drink from.

  13. #43
    us
    Priv8ear

    Aug 2018
    Shenandoah Valley Va
    WW2 Mine Detector, 2 Garrets and an Underwater Fisher (Older Machines)
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    Perhaps a springbox. My dad always said that if a spring ever got filled in it would stop flowing.

    If you are correct in saying the blocks covered the top then it was probably filled in and capped off for safety purposes. I agree with the speculation that it probably was something for watering cattle since it sets along the trail. One question, is it up hill from the house?

    If the bottom is filled with clay or is into the shale layer it would hold water for quite some time.
    Last edited by Reanm8er; May 09, 2019 at 07:36 AM.
    Phil

  14. #44

    Aug 2017
    Whites V3i & DFX
    270
    373 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    How deep? It might be a box where an old furnace once stood. I recently detected a property where the original part of the home was built in the 1840s, and it had a similar box. Also those bricks look narrow, like fire bricks. Probe the area with a metal rod to see if there is a foundation below the surface.

  15. #45
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    us
    Jan 2007
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    Maybe a ......
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    “It is best as one grows older to strip oneself of possessions, to shed oneself downward like a tree, to be almost wholly earth before one dies.”

 

 
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