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Thread: Can Anyone Help Me in Identifying this Bullet?

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  1. #1

    Sep 2016
    Mississippi
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    Can Anyone Help Me in Identifying this Bullet?

    I found this bullet in a Union army camp yesterday in west central Mississippi. It appears to be of pistol bullet size but what's unusual to me is the "tie base looking" bottom to the bullet. I've never seen a pistol bullet like this before. It's definitely unfired. Can anyone on this forum help me in identifying this bullet? Although I found it in a civil war camp, it's possible that it's not from the war. Thanks for any assistance.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    callicles likes this.

  2. #2
    us
    CS IS NEXT

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    I can't find anything that comes close Closest is a Sharps but that is way off as well.Maybe carved is my best bet.
    Ripcon likes this.

  3. #3
    Charter Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by civilman1 View Post
    I can't find anything that comes close Closest is a Sharps but that is way off as well.Maybe carved is my best bet.
    Could it be what they call a Confederate tie-ring Sharps?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by creskol; Mar 17, 2019 at 08:07 AM.
    Ripcon likes this.
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  4. #4

    Sep 2016
    Mississippi
    Tesoro
    519
    830 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    Quote Originally Posted by creskol View Post
    Could it be what they call a Confederate tie-ring Sharps?
    That looks mighty close indeed. Mine appears to be a .36 caliber or there abouts. I wonder if Sharps made pistols?

  5. #5
    us
    Mar 2010
    Southwest Georgia
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    There were two small caliber bullets made for Sharps. Your looks like a corroded version of the Gomez and Mills patent but I am not positive.
    19th Century Bullet Collection - Tom Henrique
    Ripcon likes this.
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  6. #6

    Sep 2016
    Mississippi
    Tesoro
    519
    830 times
    All Types Of Treasure Hunting
    I’m wondering if this is some type of tie ring Remington pistol bullet. Maybe an early variation??

  7. #7
    Charter Member
    us
    Bob

    Jan 2018
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    I think the ring tail Sharpes is 50 or 54 caliber, I was leaning to the pistol ball theory, maybe one of the French pin fire guns or some other obscure weapon as just about any gun you could think of was pressed into service during the war of northern aggression. Maybe even a “cleaner” bullet, who knows. This is a job for cannonball guy!!
    “I was a kid once, but I wasn’t very good at it”

  8. #8
    Educator

    Feb 2006
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    Joe-Dirt wrote:
    > This is a job for cannonball guy!!

    At y'all's service.
    According to the "Handbook Of Civil War Bullets & Cartridges":
    That bullet is a pre-civil-war .38-caliber Gomez & Mills Patent (Aug. 24, 1858) bullet for the .38 Sharps Sporting Rifle. Before that US Patent information was found, diggers called these bullets a ""Multigroove Ringtail Sharps." There is no record of any production of any caliber of "multigroove" Sharps bullets by a Confederate manufacturer.

    Your .38-caliber Sharps bullet is shown in the Handbook as bullet #103.

    The Handbook also says that during the 1850s (well before the start of the civil war), Sharps "Sporting" (meaning civilian-usage, not military) Rifles were produced in .38, .44, and .52-calibers. Also, in 1857 through '58, the Sharps Company produced a .36 Sharps Pistol. So, there is such a thing as a Sharps pistol bullet... which is shown in the Handbook as bullet #99.

    Sidenote:
    The Handbook shows ALL of the many kinds & calibers of Sharps bullets in a special section titled "Sharps Pistols, Carbines, Rifles, and Sporting Rifles, .36 to .56 Caliber."

    For everybody who reads this forum… I often feel a deep pain in my backside when I see a photo/screencap in this forum which contains both of the words "Ebay" and "Confederate." Ebay is VERY often untrustworthy about whether a civil war relic is Confederate or not. Note, an Ebay seller's "100% Satisfaction" rating should never be considered a guarantee that the seller's identification of the relic is correct.

    Sidenote for bullet-diggers and collectors:
    As my posts here about bullets often indicate, there is a HUGE amount of very valuable UP-TO-DATE information in the "Handbook Of Civil War Bullets & Cartridges" (by James E. Thomas & Dean S. Thomas). The updated info makes this book far-far superior to the old long-outdated civil war bullet book by McKee & Mason. The "Handbook" can be purchased online from several sellers, for $10 to $12. That is easily affordable for anybody who has interest in civil war bullets and wants to know their actual true ID... including whether they are Confederate or not. Please buy that $10/$12 book, folks.
    Last edited by TheCannonballGuy; Mar 19, 2019 at 05:25 PM. Reason: Typing-error correction (I typed a 9 when I meant 8 in the date).
    AARC, relic nut and Spats like this.
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  9. #9
    Charter Member
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    Joe

    Nov 2014
    VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCannonballGuy View Post
    Joe-Dirt wrote:
    > This is a job for cannonball guy!!

    At y'all's service.
    According to the "Handbook Of Civil War Bullets & Cartridges":
    That bullet is a pre-civil-war .38-caliber Gomez & Mills Patent (Aug. 24, 1858) bullet for the .38 Sharps Sporting Rifle. Before that US Patent information was found, diggers called these bullets a ""Multigroove Ringtail Sharps." There is no record of any production of any caliber of "multigroove" Sharps bullets by a Confederate manufacturer.

    Your .38-caliber Sharps bullet is shown in the Handbook as bullet #103.

    The Handbook also says that during the 1850s (well before the start of the civil war), Sharps "Sporting" (meaning civilian-usage, not military) Rifles were produced in .38, .44, and .52-calibers. Also, in 1857 through '58, the Sharps Company produced a .36 Sharps Pistol. So, there is such a thing as a Sharps pistol bullet... which is shown in the Handbook as bullet #99.

    Sidenote:
    The Handbook shows ALL of the many kinds & calibers of Sharps bullets in a special section titled "Sharps Pistols, Carbines, Rifles, and Sporting Rifles, .36 to .56 Caliber."

    For everybody who reads this forum… I often feel a deep pain in my backside when I see a photo/screencap in this forum which contains both of the words "Ebay" and "Confederate." Ebay is VERY frequently untrustworthy about whether a civil war relic is Confederate or not. Note, an Ebay seller's "100% Satisfaction" rating should NEVER be considered a guarantee that the seller's identification of the relic is correct.

    Sidenote for bullet-diggers and collectors:
    As my posts here about bullets often indicate, there is a HUGE amount of very valuable UP-TO-DATE information in the "Handbook Of Civil War Bullets & Cartridges" (by James E. Thomas & Dean S. Thomas). The updated info makes this book far-far superior to the old long-outdated civil war bullet book by McKee & Mason. The "Handbook" can be purchased online from several sellers, for $10 to $12. That is easily affordable for anybody who has interest in civil war bullets and wants to know their actual true ID... including whether they are Confederate or not. Please buy that $10/$12 book, folks.
    Well you just cost me money!
    Thanks CBG for all your knowledge on this form and the willingness to share it with others.
    TheCannonballGuy likes this.

 

 

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