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  1. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED 19th Century 3 ring bullet? Civil war era?

    The third "ring" on your bullet, near its base, is a cartridge-crimping groove, not a body-ring or body-groove. Your bullet appears to be a slightly post-civil-war (1870s) Smith & Wesson .32 brass-cartridge pistol bullet. Makes sense for its New Jersey location. The civil war .32 Smith & Wesson...
  2. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Need help to identify. Found in a creek looking for garnets.

    Smokey is on the right track. Specifically, it appears to be Botryoidal Chalcedony. Go to the link below, and scroll down to see several examples of Botryoidal Chalcedony. I particularly like the photo of Blue Botryoidal Chalcedony... see Row 12, Pic #1...
  3. Counter Weight?

    It "appears" to be a cannonball... a version sometimes called a roundshell. The precisely-measured diameter (4.40-inches) and precise weight (7.8 pounds) you reported match up almost exactly with a civil war Confederate Pentagonal "Polygonal Cavity" roundshell. (That is the Ordnance Department's...
  4. ✅ SOLVED Brass finial or rein guide or ?

    Gare said: > I do not think a rein type guide would have sharp edges. invent4hir replied: > Gare, me neither. All those I've found prior are circular - which is why I posted on TNet. Okay then, please take a close look at the rein-guides at the lower-right edge and center-left edge and at the...
  5. ✅ SOLVED Brass finial or rein guide or ?

    The key ID-clue is the object's "provision for attachment." You noticed that on yours the attachment-form matches the typical late-1800s/early-1900s rein guide (a.k.a. "rein terret"). As ARC already astutely noted, "tabletop" lamp and oil/kerosene heater finials always have female threads. A...
  6. ✅ SOLVED 17 lb cannonball

    Half Cent Hock wrote: > What I'd like help with is to determine circa. It was found in a field where there is both > colonial and civil war item found within 50 Yards. Any thoughts appreciated. Very-very few 18-Pounder Smoothbore cannons were used in the civil war. So we can almost certainly...
  7. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Port Hudson shell frags need ID

    I remember searching through my Relic Images folder for the photo of the sawed-in-half wooden fuzeplug 24-Pounder roundshell. But I see it isn't there in my post. Giving it another try now.
  8. ✅ SOLVED Old looking button

    Antiquarian is correct, as usual. Most examples of these Faux (Fake) Family-Crests/Coat-of-Arms buttons made for use by the Civilian "Fashion" clothing industry have an iron/steel back, because it is a much cheaper metal than brass. Dog Man, does your excavated find have a rusty (or rusted-out)...
  9. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Port Hudson shell frags need ID

    Every point of ID-info made by Devldog is correct. Here are some additional observations. The frags are definitely from a roundshell, not a cylindrical (bullet-shaped) shell. Definitely Confederate-made, based on being found at Port Hudson. The yankees did not use any wood-fuzeplug roundshells...
  10. ✅ SOLVED Stirrup?

    Here is my opinion: Although it can be dangerous to draw a conclusion from having only a piece of a relic, I think I can see enough to say this find appears to be a US Army Dragoons Model-1833 stirrup. Like this one, the M-1833 Dragoons stirrup was quite large, and heavily constructed of thick...
  11. ✅ SOLVED Any ideas as to the date or manufacturer of this button. Tia

    The button's backmark saying "Best Treble Plated" means your find is a brass 1-piece flatbutton which had three layers of silverplate. (In a button backmark, the term "Plated" ALWAYS meant silverplate, and Gilt meant goldplated.) The presence of an American eagle in the backmark means your...
  12. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Can anyone help on this backmark?

    IMO, Creskol got the country-of-manufacture (the "Lion Passant" in the backmark is a British hallmark) and the date-range exactly right. Sidenote: Technically, brass 1-piece flatbuttons with an indented-lettering backmark (like yours) can date as early as about 1810. But the war-of-1812 and...
  13. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED A small buttom

    Ripvanb said: > I think that might be a steel backed blazer button. You're right. The photos below show the back in non-excavated condition. It has a "pressed-&-formed rectangle" self-shank back... which dates it to the 1950s or later.
  14. Artillery Pin

    The insignia of the US Army's Coast Defense Artillery is crossed cannons with an upright bullet-shaped artillery projectile where the cannons cross. Although your insignia is not a 100% match, it is close enough to be related. But note, the official US Army version of the CDA insignia has never...
  15. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Need help with cannon ball

    ARC said: > Hey CBG... you may like this... [link] Thanks for providing the link to that well-written, FACTUALLY CORRECT article. I liked it a lot. :)
  16. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Need help with cannon ball

    You're welcome, Salty. Possibly because my previous reply was so lengthy, I forgot to mention another "big" reason that the early-Colonial-era cannons became obsolete and got melted down for casting newer models. Due to the "early-Colonial" cast-iron's brittleness causing the cannons to tend to...
  17. ✅ SOLVED Another unknown. Tia for any help

    Merf asked: > I thought that too but I am wondering when and where they were made. Your link from a Ladies Patriotic Sash-Belt was made sometime between the 1880s and (approximately) the 1920s. They seem to have been made and sold to "patriotic" wives and daughters of yankee civil war veterans...
  18. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Need help with cannon ball

    Salty asked: > Cannonball Guy-or anyone else, can you tell me if they still used Saker cannons during the Rev War? The answer is definitely No. Here is the main reason why: In the Colonial era, casting iron cannons was in a very rudimentary (early, crude) stage. Casting small metal objects is...
  19. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Button ID help please

    The letter on your button is a P written in Old-English Script. Most often, that letter written in that "font" is a generic City (or County) Police button. We time-date metal buttons by what the backmark says, and its "font," and other characteristics like the circle(s) of dots around the...
  20. 🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Need help with cannon ball

    Salty, thanks for your reply. Yes, re-measuring the ball with precision measuring devices is very important, such as caliper which measures in hundredths-of-an-inch, and a digital Postal Shiping scale which measure is tenths-of-an-ounce. (Typical household bathroom weighing scales are...
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