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  1. Thoughts

    Yeah, that spokeshave looking one got me too. Certainly looks intentional. But then you mention the cutting edge is like a quarter of an inch, and that's hard to wrap my head around. I've messed around some with flake tools, like for making arrows shafts, as an example, and just can't see...
  2. Thoughts

    I think the most likely explanation is that they are something similar to creek chatter. As flakes fall into the chip pile under the knapper's feet, they collide with other flakes. Then the knapper moves his feet back and forth while working to change postions, or just stretch a bit, and...
  3. Opinions needed

    Well, I think its natural. I'm on the other side of the country in Richmond Virginia. Richmond sits on "the falls" of the James River, a five mile stretch where the river is a jumbled mess of granite boulder rapids before dropping down onto the coastal plain. Granite balls like that are found...
  4. Savannah River Point?

    I'll answer based on what it would be called here in central Virginia: It is a "Savannah River Variant". The regional name here is "Cattle Run" named for the Cattle Run site in Chesterfield County (just south of Richmond.) In essence it the same thing as Koens-Crispin, a Late Archaic...
  5. Repaired with pine sap?

    The idea that it is a modern repair makes the most sense. Long version: Pine pitch glue wouldn't work well for a situation like this. PPG is not a "true glue", it's more along the lines of a "mastic" or "filler". It's like when you put cement in the hole around a post to help keep it in...
  6. Outstanding Conference Talk

    Overall I enjoyed it and thought it was a good "big picture" overview of the current science. I did have one issue worth mentioning: His mention of a sterile layer between Clovis and pre-Clovis at a number of sites got my attention as a recurring theme. I was glad someone asked a question...
  7. Stone Hoe

    That's interesting. Is that granite? Just about all of them I've seen in our area are made from flattish quartzite cobbles. They do seem to be one of those "expedient tools" that is quickly banged out of whatever rock is at hand, used for some purpose, then left. They don't seem to be what...
  8. New Points For My Son - Info Please

    As others have said, those are all good. All are quartzite except the white quartz triangle. Look to be Mid Archaic to Early Woodland in age. If you want to try to put names to them work your way through this list: https://www.dhr.virginia.gov/points/
  9. Flake Clovis

    Georgetown
  10. Flake Clovis

    I bit of Sunday fun. I found a large waste flake in my chip pile. Imagine being a Clovis dude and you're carrying this around to use as a knife/scraper type tool: You find yourself running low on knapable stone. The quarry is a couple of days away, but the herd of tasty steaks is where you...
  11. Butterscotch quartz

    Found an interesting little quartz cobble while out for a walk. Took it home and did a bipolar split. Oh, that's purdy! That fat end that didn't came off is going to be trouble, though: Came out okay. A little wonky but I've learned the hard way if you try to "fix" it too much with this...
  12. Clovis Platter Bifaces

    But one has to consider that while African and south Asian elephants had the luxury of co-evolving along side early Hominids, American species did not. Based on the thickness of the bones, it is estimated Mammoths topped out at about 13 mph. African elephants are known to hit 25 mph in short...
  13. Medicine Bundle

    I thought the event you speak of was the end of the Late Archaic. In his paper "What Happened in the Early Woodland?" (Archaeology of Eastern North America, Vol. 29, 2001) Stuart Fiedel pegs the approximate time at around 850 B.C. The hallmarks are what appears from the archeology to be...
  14. You Want a Point ?

    Sweet. Love the double flute on the one face. Looks like the flute failed on the other face and was not re-attempted. I'm guessing that is because the point is thin and flat in cross section, which would make attempting another flute nearly impossible. I don't like it as a Redstone, the...
  15. Tools from frame 50

    HP, The wear pattern on those kind of looks familiar. If you get a chance could you paste the link below into your browser and look at the paper. Scroll to the end under the heading "Wear Patterns" and the two last pictures. Does it look like a possibility to what you have...
  16. Question

    You are on a quarry site or a work site near a quarry. See pages 159-227 of: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uva.x001726249&view=1up&seq=12
  17. Strange tool or waste rock?

    Hook shaped flakes (and all kinds of other odd shapes) like that are sometimes produced incidentally when flint knapping. When I blow up the pictures, they get blurry. If the edge was purposely modified to make a spokeshave, you should see pressure flake scars used to bevel the edge inside the...
  18. Old finds 2

    That looks very similar to an artifact commonly found at the Williamson Clovis site (et al) here in Virginia. Dr. McCoy, who did the excavation there, called them "chisel wedges". The key it that thick, flat, heavily battered end where (in theory any way) it was beat on to drive the blade end...
  19. Virginia: Catoctin Greenstone

    I'm in central Virginia so have access to it. Quite common on the eastern slope of the Appalachians. which is the closest source for me (Greene, Madison, Orange counties). It does occasionally show up in cobble form in the James River here in Richmond. Scott Silsby's work with the material is...
  20. Deer Toe Points

    I looked up the reference from Jamestown. William Strachey in "History of Travel", chapter 8: "Their arrows are made of straight young sprigs which they head with bone two or three inches long; these they us to shoot at squirrels and all kind of fowl." If found in shell middens, maybe for...
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