1941 Golf Tournament Token

JeffDowns

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Found this today: 1941 The British War Relief Society Inc National Golf Tournament Token
 

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JeffDowns

JeffDowns

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I think it was 6-7 inches; using AT-Max.
 
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JeffDowns

JeffDowns

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It's about the size of a half dime.
 

Red-Coat

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Neat item, but not a "token" as most people would understand the term. I believe it's a "ball marker" given to participants in the tournaments, and perhaps also sold to golf enthusiast spectators as a means of raising further funds. They're used on the green to replace where your ball lies so that your opponent's putt can't be affected by your ball and your ball can't be knocked out of place by your opponent's. Like this one:

Ball Marker.jpg

I don't know how much it fetched at that auction, but golfing memorabilia of any kind is highly collectible and that one obviously justified being listed as a standalone lot.
 

Mackaydon

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One month before that tournament, this was the situation in London:
The last major attack on London was on 10/11 May 1941, on which the Luftwaffe flew 571 sorties and dropped 800 tonnes of bombs. This caused more than 2,000 fires; 1,436 people were killed and 1,792 seriously injured, which affected morale badly.[165] Another raid was carried out on 11/12 May 1941.[160] Westminster Abbey and the Law Courts were damaged, while the Chamber of the House of Commons was destroyed. One-third of London's streets were impassable. All but one railway station line was blocked for several weeks. --per Wiki.

Imagine playing golf when, at any moment, you could get bombed--not by a stray shot, but by an actual bomb !!

The Brits used an idiom that perfectly fits this situation:
A person who is said to have a stiff upper lip displays fortitude and stoicism in the face of adversity, or exercises great self-restraint in the expression of emotion.[1][2] The phrase is most commonly heard as part of the idiom "keep a stiff upper lip", and has traditionally been used to describe an attribute of British people in remaining resolute and unemotional when faced with adversity.[1] A sign of fear is trembling of the upper lip, hence the saying keep a "stiff" upper lip.[

Great find and a true 'token' of history.
Don....
 

Relicific

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Red-Coat

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One month before that tournament, this was the situation in London:
The last major attack on London was on 10/11 May 1941, on which the Luftwaffe flew 571 sorties and dropped 800 tonnes of bombs. This caused more than 2,000 fires; 1,436 people were killed and 1,792 seriously injured, which affected morale badly.[165] Another raid was carried out on 11/12 May 1941.[160] Westminster Abbey and the Law Courts were damaged, while the Chamber of the House of Commons was destroyed. One-third of London's streets were impassable. All but one railway station line was blocked for several weeks. --per Wiki.

Imagine playing golf when, at any moment, you could get bombed--not by a stray shot, but by an actual bomb !!

The Brits used an idiom that perfectly fits this situation:
A person who is said to have a stiff upper lip displays fortitude and stoicism in the face of adversity, or exercises great self-restraint in the expression of emotion.[1][2] The phrase is most commonly heard as part of the idiom "keep a stiff upper lip", and has traditionally been used to describe an attribute of British people in remaining resolute and unemotional when faced with adversity.[1] A sign of fear is trembling of the upper lip, hence the saying keep a "stiff" upper lip.[

Great find and a true 'token' of history.
Don....

The British War Relief Society was founded in America, before the US entered the war, as a way of providing charitable assistance to a nation very much in need of if (thanks guys). So there wouldn't have been bombs dropping during that golf tournament... it was held in America as part of the fund-raising programme.

Nevertheless, you're right. Life carried on with a degree of stoicism despite the bombing and other hardships. Generally, we Brits can muddle through as long as we can still brew up a cuppa.

Blitz.jpg Milkman.jpg Calm.jpg
 

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