A SERIOUS question for those that KNOW or think they KNOW

Zincoln Miner

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Ancient, forgotten human technology - but more likely ALIENS !

If you guy's are interested in this subject you should read about or watch the documentaries on the
"Coral Castle" that one man built by himself in Florida almost 100 years ago.
 

Zincoln Miner

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The foundation stones of temple mount in Jerusalem are huge, the largest found so far is 47’x11’.

(Edited because of loose nut behind the keyboard)
The Romans sacked, and tore down the Temple in the 70s CE.

They rebuilt it as a Temple to Jupiter. Ancient Roman crane technology moved blocks such as these.

I see shows like Ancient Aliens treat these types of material as mysterious when it's in only crane engineering.

Just search "Ancient Roman Greek Cranes".
 

pulltabfelix

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Since the advent of steel and concrete use in our buildings, the need for masters in stone craft had all but disappeared and the knowledge with it.
 

Reulte

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May I respectfully disagree? There was a "chief" and a "spiritual leader", side by side. As cultures moved from scattered family groups to centralized cities, the political factions began to dominate the spiritual factions. This was required because, as the cultures grew, a central system was needed to control groups larger than the family unit. A natural progression. I'm not talking about today's political abomination.... we'll leave that discussion for another forum. ╦╦C

This reminds me of a book passage (The Murder Room by Michael Capuzzo, introduction).

"Chieftain, warrior, shaman or king, knight, magician. When the world is broken and needs fixing the thing to do is to find the three right men. The story begins with the world in ruins. Crops wither, even the trees are dead, tortured bones. The wounded king is powerless and cannot act without help. He needs two other men to embark on a journey. Men of great and unique talents that complement his own."

ETA: Ugh - corrected spelling.
 
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Slowtaknow

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Today i was watching the history channel about VERY EARLY Stone works. They are talking THOUSANDS of years ago with no HEAVY equipment . They built many stone works with a lot of stones weighing over 200 TONS perfectly cut STRAIGHT EDGES ! PREFECT FITS . South America, Africa , Europe just to name a few places. How do you think they did it ?I find it TOTALLY AMAZING 11! What is YOUR OPINION

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Jim in Idaho

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How is it that Roman concrete is vastly superior to the very best modern concrete. Which requires rebar for strength whereas Roman doesn’t need it.
Roman concrete is not superior....it's actually weaker in compressive strength by a considerable margin, but it's WAY more durable. Modern chemists are still working to accomplish our modern strengths with greater durability.
 

Clay Diggins

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Today i was watching the history channel about VERY EARLY Stone works. They are talking THOUSANDS of years ago with no HEAVY equipment . They built many stone works with a lot of stones weighing over 200 TONS perfectly cut STRAIGHT EDGES ! PREFECT FITS . South America, Africa , Europe just to name a few places. How do you think they did it ?I find it TOTALLY AMAZING 11! What is YOUR OPINION ?
The physics haven't changed in all those millennium. The only real difference between the stone work of thousands of years ago and the stonework of today is the simple fact that we have electric and fuel powered tools whereas the ancients had to rely on human or animal power.

Humans haven't gotten smarter nor have they gotten dumber. We can work faster today and the "modern" mentality is that perfection isn't a goal it's an obstacle to more good stuff cheaper and faster. I seriously doubt you could find any ancient stonework that couldn't be reproduced today.
 
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There are examples all over this world . To do what they have done with out the tools and equipment we have now is totally amazing
 

airborne1092

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The story of man is not one of evolution but devolution. As created, our ancestors were made in the image of God. It's been all downhill since then. We are conditioned to think that if we find a primitive tribe in the jungle, that that is a picture of early man. It is actually a picture of extremely advanced man, who degenerates to primitivism over time.

Finding seemingly impossible constructions such as you point out shows that we have lost some of our once-natural abilities.
Interesting take from the other side of the coin.

I've always believed in a remote, or distant past without the 'modern man' hubris to believe that we are always advancing. Global, catastrophic events in the past have left primitive humans to grow our ant colony again, toward the next collapse. Oral histories globally, contain fragments of this technology and our past, as do pictographs and cave art.
 

Zincoln Miner

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Some people are addicted to their imagination.

Remember that drug addictions, and thought addictions are closely related on a neurological level. The latter is basicly what one wants to believe is what brings about the neurochemical processes for behaviour repetition.

With our increased cognitive abilities we invented ways that go beyond our energy gathering, and specie perpetuation instincts.
 

Reulte

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Roman concrete is not superior....it's actually weaker in compressive strength by a considerable margin, but it's WAY more durable. Modern chemists are still working to accomplish our modern strengths with greater durability.

I'm not sure if it's weaker... the pozolantic ash/sand changes the chemical composition from calcium carbonate (which causes the cracks & weakness of the cement) to something more durable... a silicon blend which doesn't crack. I think the pozolan comes from volcanos -- which doesn't really explain the durability of Roman concrete in England.
 

Zincoln Miner

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Jim in Idaho

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I'm not sure if it's weaker... the pozolantic ash/sand changes the chemical composition from calcium carbonate (which causes the cracks & weakness of the cement) to something more durable... a silicon blend which doesn't crack. I think the pozolan comes from volcanos -- which doesn't really explain the durability of Roman concrete in England.
It's been tested. Roman concrete is about 1000-1500 psi. Modern concrete easily makes 3,500, and can go as high as 7,000 with special mixes. We have the capability of chemical blends where the Romans were dependent on natural chemical blends. It may turn out that the stronger the compressive strength, the less durability. It could turn out that weaker concrete is more "flexible" and thus less likely to fracture.
Jim
 

Reulte

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It's been tested. Roman concrete is about 1000-1500 psi. Modern concrete easily makes 3,500, and can go as high as 7,000 with special mixes. We have the capability of chemical blends where the Romans were dependent on natural chemical blends. It may turn out that the stronger the compressive strength, the less durability. It could turn out that weaker concrete is more "flexible" and thus less likely to fracture.
Jim
Knife blades are kind of like that -- sharp, easy to sharpen but difficult to keep that edge, dulls quicker, more brittle vs dullish (a knife isn't really ever 'dull'), difficult to actually get an edge but dang... it will last forever and nothing will break it.

Generally speaking, of course.
 

Zakon Krzyżacki

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Today i was watching the history channel about VERY EARLY Stone works. They are talking THOUSANDS of years ago with no HEAVY equipment . They built many stone works with a lot of stones weighing over 200 TONS perfectly cut STRAIGHT EDGES ! PREFECT FITS . South America, Africa , Europe just to name a few places. How do you think they did it ?I find it TOTALLY AMAZING 11! What is YOUR OPINION ?
Those who came before.
 

Andysfinds

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Today i was watching the history channel about VERY EARLY Stone works. They are talking THOUSANDS of years ago with no HEAVY equipment . They built many stone works with a lot of stones weighing over 200 TONS perfectly cut STRAIGHT EDGES ! PREFECT FITS . South America, Africa , Europe just to name a few places. How do you think they did it ?I find it TOTALLY AMAZING 11! What is YOUR OPINION ?
Maybe they used woven strings or vines to get a straight edge. Just a thought.
 

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