Another reason for detectorists to carry a weapon

Monty

Gold Member
Jan 26, 2005
10,746
163
Sand Springs, OK
Detector(s) used
ACE 250, Garrett
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I was just reading a yahoo news article about ferel hogs. As I have hunted in S.Texas quite a few times I have found that there are literally thousands of ferel hogs running at large on many properties. And this is not only true on big open country property, but they are now enroaching on suburbia and many of the exclusive gated communities. These things are dangerous and can seriously injure even the biggest toughest of us if cornered or if you meet up with a sow and piglets or even a big boar that has become territorial. I saw one that was killed during deer season that went nearly 400 lbs and had tusks about 6" long! That's as big as a lion and probably just as dangerous.
So, to the "meat" of the problem, pun intended! They are easy to kill if you hit them right square between the eyes. We had hogs when I was a child and a .22 long rifle between the eyes would bring one down instantly. But, if a 400 lb. mad boar is charging you, a shot between the eyes is almost an imopossible feat. So if hunting wild boar areas I would suggest carrying some heavier artillery. Bear repellent would only piss one off. And if you should meet one face to face, don't turn your back on him and look for a tree very close and easy to climb, back away facing him and move slowly. Chances are he is as frightened as you are and the old "fight or flight" adage kicks in. Most of the time they will be more concerned with escape, but sometimes they will charge at you. If they do charge, move at right angles at the last moment and they may go on by and run away. If not, be ready to defend yourself. A shot in the middle of the head right between the eyes is the best (if possible). But a shot that would traverse from one ear hole to another would be deadly. A shot to the lower chest area just behind the front leg would hit the heart, and a spinal shot would at least temporarily paralize him for enough time for you to escape. Climbing the tree is the best thing if you are close enough. Taking a well heeled partner would be very helpful too. But above all be careful if you must shoot. The bullet is more deadly than the hog if you miss and hit your hunting partner. The best defense would be for you to avoid a confrontation if piossible. Look for signs of fresh rooting and listen for their noise, grunting and oinking. Please not that I am no professional hunter and my advice is purely informational. Above all, be careful. I would normally say to use your headphones, but if hunting hog areas, I would suggest being able to hear and be aware of your surroundings. Monty
 

Jeep

Bronze Member
Mar 27, 2008
1,556
17
32°46′58″N 96°48′14″W
Detector(s) used
My other detector is a helicopter
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All Treasure Hunting
They can be a handful, most of them don't want to have anything to do with us humans but there is always
the exception.

When I used to do my hunting we used to run into them, or spot them from the deer stand. Shoot and
process like a deer. Good eating.

One year we was over run by these critters, Just to many of them to deal with.......

If cornered or threatened you can be in for a world of hurt.

Be careful when processing one for food, wear gloves because they do transmit swine brucellosis

If your in feral pig country ya better have a good aim and a good caliber and in Texas there is no limit
and they are always in season :icon_thumright:
 

sandtrout

Full Member
Jan 27, 2010
206
18
two guys are camping. one morning one of them gets up and goes outside only to run back in and put on some tennis shoes. The other guy asks if there's anything wrong. the guy finishes tying his tennis shoes says there's a grizzly bear running over here. the other guy says that it's impossible to out run a bear. the other one says i don't have to out run a bear...i just have to out run YOU. so...if you don't have gun, take someone you don't care for that you can OUT RUN. :laughing9:
 

BridgeHunter

Jr. Member
Jul 5, 2011
26
0
Uriah, Alabama
Detector(s) used
Fisher Quicksilver Pro , White Spectra V3i
Packing any time I'm in the woods or isolated area detecting. Hogs,black bear,coyotes and snakes at least a Glock 9mm or S&W 357. Good to have a concealed weapons permit and land owner knows you are packing.
 
OP
Monty

Monty

Gold Member
Jan 26, 2005
10,746
163
Sand Springs, OK
Detector(s) used
ACE 250, Garrett
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
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Given my choice I would prefer the .357 mag to the 9mm Glock. The .357 with the heaviest soft nose bullet you can find would be best because you want all the penetration you can get. I found a box of .357, 180 gr. solid bullets and have a few left around my loading bench somewhere. I loaded them to the max for about 1200 fps and I would think they would make a perfect bullet for heavy dangerous varmints, or at least the best you could do in each of those two calibers. I've always thought of the 9mm as a "mouse" gun and I was sorely disappointed when the military went to the 9mm Berettas. It was proven back during the Philliipine insurection that the .38 caliber wasn't all that great a man stoper. I often carry my .40 S&W with hard cast 180 grain solid lead bullets as I think they would make a nice big .40 caliber hole and the hard cast bullets penetrate extremely well. (Caution, do not use solid lead bullets in a Glock. I found out the hard way that a Glock's polygonal barrel will lead up even with hard cast bullets and can cause a blow up)! After I blew the trigger out of my Glock 24, I invested in an after market rifled target barrel and now I can shoot any bullet I want to. For everyday carry in suburbia I prefer my old reliable .45 ACP Colt nickel plated Combat Commander. Loaded with just about any hollow point bullet it makes a fine two legged varmint stopper. I prefer the 180 grain XTPs loaded to about 1050 fps. The old hard nose 230 grain bullet may be best for any ferel varmints you might encounter in the bush though. I've done quite a bit of research with various calibers, bullet weights and configurations and those are the ones I found to fit the purpose for whatever you might need a weapon for. Monty
 

kenley

Hero Member
Nov 2, 2008
547
6
Seminole County, Ok.
Detector(s) used
GTI 2500
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
Monty, It was finally cool enough yesterday evening to stuff some brass. I load for paper punching with my .45ACP and .357. For the serious stuff, I use store bought. 125gr JHP in the .357 and some FBI issued Silvertips in the .45. I had to run out and buy large pistol primers Saturday. OUCH ! $40.00 a box + tax. The last I bought was $17.45 (Thank you obama)
That makes em cost a nickel a bang. Was 1.5 cents.
 

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rockhound

Bronze Member
Apr 9, 2005
1,056
591
Yes, hogs can be aggressive some times during the year. Especially when surprised or cornered. I carry a 9 mm when I am in the wild or away from civilization. I have become quite efficient with it. It is a older military Beretta(helwan brigidier), made for the Egyptian army in the 1950's, and has been redone, barrel, slide and trigger. Nice shooting gun out to 75 yards. I normally use 115 grain jacketed bullets and are extremely accurate in my gun.Be careful out there, there are more critters than hogs. Good Luck. rockhound
 

Quinc

Jr. Member
Jul 18, 2011
28
0
Don't you guys ever bring your dog(s) with you when you go detecting?? If nothing else they will give you some warning.

My weapon of choice; use it to cut down brush and for protection. 8)
20$ at slickguns.com
31wC1F-g5NL._SL500_AA300_.jpg
 

rdavidson

Greenie
Jun 20, 2011
11
1
Middle Georgia
Primary Interest:
Cache Hunting
I wear a 40 caliber glock under my shirt all the time. I worry more about feral crackheads than hogs, but the hogs are spreading everywhere. I had a game warden tell me here in Georgia that feral hogs were his number one problem with the coyote coming in second. I would like to see both disappear off the face of the earth but it ain't going to happen. All the hunters are shooting and some are trapping both but they still are expanding their range. The Indians had a saying about the coyote, they said that when the last man on earth was dead the coyote would be here to howl over his grave.. That's kinda hard to understand, who will bury the last man on earth?
 

Jeep

Bronze Member
Mar 27, 2008
1,556
17
32°46′58″N 96°48′14″W
Detector(s) used
My other detector is a helicopter
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
rdavidson said:
I wear a 40 caliber glock under my shirt all the time. I worry more about feral crackheads than hogs, but the hogs are spreading everywhere. I had a game warden tell me here in Georgia that feral hogs were his number one problem with the coyote coming in second. I would like to see both disappear off the face of the earth but it ain't going to happen. All the hunters are shooting and some are trapping both but they still are expanding their range. The Indians had a saying about the coyote, they said that when the last man on earth was dead the coyote would be here to howl over his grave.. That's kinda hard to understand, who will bury the last man on earth?

Feral crackheads :icon_thumright: :laughing7: :laughing7: :laughing7:

Best description in a thread ever :notworthy:
 

nuggy

Sr. Member
Aug 22, 2010
460
62
Detector(s) used
Fisher Gold Bug Pro, had; Minelab Eureka, Bounty Hunter, Garrett, Fisher and Whites.
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Dang, wild hogs - no problem - that's bacon, ham and barbecue right there. Eat them - fill up your freezer. Wish I had the same problem. Nuggy
 

Dano Sverige

Silver Member
Aug 10, 2009
2,946
189
SWEDEN
Detector(s) used
(on the dry)Minelab ETRAC, backup x-terra 305.(in the wet ) Minelab Excalibur II
rdavidson said:
I wear a 40 caliber glock under my shirt all the time. I worry more about feral crackheads than hogs, but the hogs are spreading everywhere. I had a game warden tell me here in Georgia that feral hogs were his number one problem with the coyote coming in second. I would like to see both disappear off the face of the earth but it ain't going to happen. All the hunters are shooting and some are trapping both but they still are expanding their range. The Indians had a saying about the coyote, they said that when the last man on earth was dead the coyote would be here to howl over his grave.. That's kinda hard to understand, who will bury the last man on earth?

His woman! :wink:
 

ES66

Sr. Member
Oct 3, 2008
264
2
Eagan, MN
Detector(s) used
White's XLT
I'm glad we don't have those buggers in Minnesota... What a headache... It is interesting to note, on a National Geographic special on grizzly bears they did a test to see what would be more effective at stopping a charging grizzly, a gun or pepper spray.... It turns out the pepper spray is WAY more effective...
 

illumastorm

Jr. Member
Jul 24, 2011
25
0
west central indiana
Detector(s) used
discovery 1,000
sandtrout said:
two guys are camping. one morning one of them gets up and goes outside only to run back in and put on some tennis shoes. The other guy asks if there's anything wrong. the guy finishes tying his tennis shoes says there's a grizzly bear running over here. the other guy says that it's impossible to out run a bear. the other one says i don't have to out run a bear...i just have to out run YOU. so...if you don't have gun, take someone you don't care for that you can OUT RUN. :laughing9:

thats just not right but funny :walk:

and the ferel crackheads , they should be open season all year :violent1:
 

buzzgator

Sr. Member
Nov 15, 2006
374
17
Detector(s) used
Nautilus DMC-IIBa/Tesoro Cibola
Dont forget a sharp knife ya gotta cut them big boars balls off or it will make the meat taste bad. At least thats what Ive always been told.
 

jcono

Jr. Member
Aug 31, 2011
74
52
I have a friend who bow hunts for hogs, usually in NC. He says their breastplate is so tough it's almost impenetrable, even with a high caliber weapon. They have to be hit in the chest area with a side shot. Also says they are multiplying like crazy- any landowner down south will welcome hunters to their property to kill as many hogs as they can- they not only eat plants/ crops, worse yet dig up the roots, so the plants are totally destroyed.
Wish I could carry up here in NJ; I'd pack my S&W model 686- a beautiful .357!!
 

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