Best Tip I've heard in 49 years of metal detecting.

Texas Jay

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Probably the best metal detecting tip I've heard in my 49 years of hunting came from the late Charles Garrett when he said that you need to put 100 hours on your detector before you can really understand its capabilities. Truer words have never been spoken. Too many people, who are just starting out in this amazing hobby, allow others to talk trash about their "beginner detectors" and take their unwise advise to move up to a "deeper, better, or more expensive" metal detector before they've used the one they have for even 10 hours or less. I bought a Garrett Ace 250 several years ago but only this year decided to give it a real workout and learn what it could do. So I've let my more expensive detectors collect dust for the past few months and have used the 250 exclusively. Yesterday, I logged my 105th hour on that little detector and it has performed amazingly well. I regularly hunt with guys who use detectors that cost at least 3 times and as much as 10 times the cost of my Ace 250 and I usually come out with the best finds of the day. Let the other guys sit around at the coffee shop, bragging about their expensive detectors, while you get out in the field with yours and make some truly remarkable discoveries. Above all, have fun!
~Texas Jay

Central Texas Treasure Club

 
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FreeBirdTim

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The big difference between the Ace 250 and the AT Pro is the amount of trash you will dig. I loved my Ace 250, but I dug way too much trash. Bottle caps ringing up as quarters drove me nuts! I rarely dig up steel bottle caps with my AT Pro. Bottom line, you will find more treasure if you dig less trash.
 

TheRake71

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May 23, 2012
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Jay I'm curious as to where you keep your 250 settings when you hunt. I have one, and to your point, not nearly enough hours to be an "expert," however, always looking for tips to improve.
 
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Tpmetal

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There's only one way to find out. Get out your road atlas and set your car in the direction of Brownwood, Texas and give me a call when you're on your way. I'm in the phone book. Most of the sites I hunt have heavy trash and deep targets but very little mineralization issues. I was hunting with another CTTC member last Monday, who also uses and Ace 250 and is very experienced with it, and he found the oldest coin, ever found with a metal detector, in this county (which didn't have a settler in it until the late 1850s) - an 1805 Draped Bust quarter in Poor condition as it is nearly slick. It was about 9.5" deep.
~Texas Jay

Next time I am in texas I'm down for sure. also hollar at me if you ever find your way into south western/central ny or north western/central pa. Love me some digging, sounds like we could have some fun.
 
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Texas Jay

Texas Jay

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Feb 11, 2006
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Jay I'm curious as to where you keep your 250 settings when you hunt. I have one, and to your point, not nearly enough hours to be an "expert," however, always looking for tips to improve.

Hi TheRake71. I keep my Ace 250 set on Jewelry Mode most of the time and the sensitivity usually only one bar down from maximum because we don't have mineralized ground problems in my area of central Texas. Occasionally, I'll switch to all-metal to get a better understanding of a target. I don't mind digging pull tabs, pop-tops, pennies, or nickels to get the occasional gold ring or pendant. :) Once I got enough hours on the Ace 250 to understand it, I find that I'm not having to dig near as much trash as I was when I started using it. I have about 170 hours on mine now. In the past 2 evenings (3 hours total), I've dug 56 coins, a brass amusement token, and an 18k gold-plated man's wedding band from a small and very trashy lot where a tiny house once sat and I've dug very few pieces of trash.
I encourage you to ignore the naysayers who claim that you need to buy a much more expensive detector to be successful and keep putting the hours on your Ace. It will surprise you.
~Texas Jay
 
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Texas Jay

Texas Jay

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Feb 11, 2006
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Brownwood, Texas
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Next time I am in texas I'm down for sure. also hollar at me if you ever find your way into south western/central ny or north western/central pa. Love me some digging, sounds like we could have some fun.

Yes, I guarantee you that we'll have fun if we get to detect together in this very historic, but little-known, area of rural central Texas. Our Central Texas Treasure Club will be holding our Annual Fall Open Competition Hunt on October 13th. We will have detectorists from all over Texas and even have a couple coming from Alaska to participate. It will be our biggest and best Hunt in our club's 37-year history.

http://centraltexastreasureclub.webs.com

~Texas Jay
 

George (MN)

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May 16, 2005
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Probably the best metal detecting tip I've heard in my 49 years of hunting came from the late Charles Garrett when he said that you need to put 100 hours on your detector before you can really understand its capabilities.

Central Texas Treasure Club


Are all detectors equally complicated? Are all brains of the same abilities? Wouldn't these things make the 100 hours either less or more than what is needed?
 

OZARKS

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IMO it depends on the individual, how fast of a learner they are personally. I've seen guys in the hobby 3 years that didn't know their detectors, just beep n diggers... it comes down to the individuals learning curve, but 100 hrs is a good baseline....
 
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Texas Jay

Texas Jay

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Feb 11, 2006
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I think the best tip I’ve ever heard and has gotten me more gold and jewelry than ever b4, is from the best treasure hunter around...Mr. Gary Drayton. “Nobody ever gets it all..The gold is there you just have to slow down and be methodical on your hunts” after reading and watching his videos I’m able to find more goodies on each hunt.

Yeah, Gary Drayton. Isn't he the guy on the History Channel's The Curse of Oak Island and The Curse of Civil War Gold? He's the one who claimed that either a V nickel or a Shield nickel (which had stars on the reverse) was definitely a Confederate coin on The Curse of Civil War Gold. The problem with that claim, that was allowed to go uncorrected, was that the Confederacy never issued any coinage. During the same segment, he claimed that of all the several metal detectors on the field that day, only his Minelab could detect gold. ha. That lie was never corrected either.
Gary Drayton may be the "best treasure hunter around" his county but he's not even among the Top 20 in the world.
~Texas Jay
 

Ol' Kentuck

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Yeah, Gary Drayton. Isn't he the guy on the History Channel's The Curse of Oak Island and The Curse of Civil War Gold? He's the one who claimed that either a V nickel or a Shield nickel (which had stars on the reverse) was definitely a Confederate coin on The Curse of Civil War Gold. The problem with that claim, that was allowed to go uncorrected, was that the Confederacy never issued any coinage. During the same segment, he claimed that of all the several metal detectors on the field that day, only his Minelab could detect gold. ha. That lie was never corrected either.
Gary Drayton may be the "best treasure hunter around" his county but he's not even among the Top 20 in the world.
~Texas Jay


Horse Pucky. :nono: They certainly DID issue coinage.


https://www.govmint.com/coin-authority/post/coins-of-the-civil-war/

Coins of the Civil War

Most people are aware of Civil War paper money, and federal issue coinage, minted between 1861 through 1865. However, it’s a little known fact that the Confederacy minted coins at the three Southern Branch Mints located at Charlotte North Carolina, Dahlonega, Georgia, and New Orleans, Louisiana. After secession in 1861, this valuable Federal property was now located in the new Confederate States of America. The Branch Mints were seized, at first by their State Governments, and then turned over to the Confederacy.

At first, small numbers of gold coins were produced from U.S. dies at all three branches, and a larger quantity of half dollars were also coined at the New Orleans Mint. When existing supplies of bullion ran dry, the three branch mints stopped producing U.S. coinage and closed, and only one mint would return into production years later when the New Orleans Mint re-opened in 1879.

New Orleans Half Dollars

The New Orleans Mint is the only Mint in America to have coined money by three Governments, The United States, Louisiana State, and Confederate States of America (CSA). In the first months of 1861, the New Orleans Mint struck 1861-O Liberty Seated Half Dollars for three different Governments. The 1861-O Half Dollars have one of the most historic pedigrees in numismatics, during one of the most dramatic years in our Nation’s history.

In 1861, New Orleans Mint only coined two denominations, one each in gold and silver, there were about 18,000 Double Eagles, and over 2.5 million silver half dollars were minted before the Branch Mint closed. Of those half dollars, only 330,000 were issued under federal authority before the mint was sized. The State of Louisiana coined 1,240,000 half dollars, and the CSA even struck 962,633 of these coins.

S.S. Republic Shipwreck Treasure

Six months after the end of the Civil War, the sidewheel steamer, SS Republic, was bound from New York to New Orleans on October 18, 1865, with a cargo of a reported $400,000 in gold and silver coins to aid in the rebuilding of the war-ravaged city of New Orleans to its prewar glory. Unfortunately, the ship never made port, caught in a massive hurricane off the coast of Georgia. At 4 pm on October 25, 1865, the SS Republic sank, and came to rest 1,700 feet deep in the Atlantic Ocean, approximately 100 miles of the Georgia coast. The passengers and crew escaped in four lifeboats and a makeshift raft in 40-foot seas.

Nearly 140 years later in November 2003, Odyssey Marine Exploration began the archaeological excavation of the SS Republic. State-of-the-art electronics and recovery equipment, revealed a dazzling carpet of coins hidden on the ocean floor at the stern of the ship, near the ship’s rudder. The Recovery team brought to the surface a stunning treasure trove of over 51,000 U.S. gold and silver coins. What makes the SS Republic shipwreck treasure so special, was the discovery of a large quantity of 1861 Liberty Seated Half Dollars, which proved to be the only U.S. coin ever struck by three different governments at the start of the Civil War.


Drayton's comment on the Shield Nickel was because they became known as "Rebel Nickels" due to their design.


Five-Cent Shield Nickel

The five-cent piece came about for the same reasons the three-cent nickel was created in 1865, to help redeem and replace the five-cent notes of fractional currency. The Act of May 16, 1866, ushered in what would become one of the mainstays of our country’s coinage, the future 5 cent nickel. These coins could be purchased in “Lawful Currency” of the U.S. and it prohibited the further issuance of fractional paper valued at less than 10 cents. The Nickel was made a legal tender in amounts up to $1 and then could be redeemed for “National Currency” in sums not less than $100. The new coins were accepted immediately, though a smaller coinage of half-dimes continued until eliminated by law in 1873.

This coin became to be known as “Longacre’s Nickel” which like his previous two-cent piece, features a Union shield on the obverse (also known as a Shield Nickel), draped by a laurel wreath with two crossed arrows behind the shield at the bottom, with the date below. At the top of the coin, around the edge, was the motto, “In God We Trust.” But below that, on top of the wreath, was an ancient style cross of uncertain origin which became quite controversial, and was nicknamed, the “Tombstone Nickel”. The reverse of the five-cent nickel was also somewhat controversial. It featured a large numeral 5 surrounded by a circle of 13 stars, with rays flowing out from among the stars in 1866 to 1867. There were production problems striking the rays, so in 1867 the rays were removed through the end of the series. There was also an issue with the public, because the “Stars and Bars” was reminiscent of the recently defeated Confederacy, which earned this new coin a new nickname… the “Rebel Nickel.”

 
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Texas Jay

Texas Jay

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Feb 11, 2006
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Brownwood, Texas
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Horse Pucky. :nono: They certainly DID issue coinage.


https://www.govmint.com/coin-authority/post/coins-of-the-civil-war/

Coins of the Civil War

Most people are aware of Civil War paper money, and federal issue coinage, minted between 1861 through 1865. However, it’s a little known fact that the Confederacy minted coins at the three Southern Branch Mints located at Charlotte North Carolina, Dahlonega, Georgia, and New Orleans, Louisiana. After secession in 1861, this valuable Federal property was now located in the new Confederate States of America. The Branch Mints were seized, at first by their State Governments, and then turned over to the Confederacy.

At first, small numbers of gold coins were produced from U.S. dies at all three branches, and a larger quantity of half dollars were also coined at the New Orleans Mint. When existing supplies of bullion ran dry, the three branch mints stopped producing U.S. coinage and closed, and only one mint would return into production years later when the New Orleans Mint re-opened in 1879.

New Orleans Half Dollars

The New Orleans Mint is the only Mint in America to have coined money by three Governments, The United States, Louisiana State, and Confederate States of America (CSA). In the first months of 1861, the New Orleans Mint struck 1861-O Liberty Seated Half Dollars for three different Governments. The 1861-O Half Dollars have one of the most historic pedigrees in numismatics, during one of the most dramatic years in our Nation’s history.

In 1861, New Orleans Mint only coined two denominations, one each in gold and silver, there were about 18,000 Double Eagles, and over 2.5 million silver half dollars were minted before the Branch Mint closed. Of those half dollars, only 330,000 were issued under federal authority before the mint was sized. The State of Louisiana coined 1,240,000 half dollars, and the CSA even struck 962,633 of these coins.

S.S. Republic Shipwreck Treasure

Six months after the end of the Civil War, the sidewheel steamer, SS Republic, was bound from New York to New Orleans on October 18, 1865, with a cargo of a reported $400,000 in gold and silver coins to aid in the rebuilding of the war-ravaged city of New Orleans to its prewar glory. Unfortunately, the ship never made port, caught in a massive hurricane off the coast of Georgia. At 4 pm on October 25, 1865, the SS Republic sank, and came to rest 1,700 feet deep in the Atlantic Ocean, approximately 100 miles of the Georgia coast. The passengers and crew escaped in four lifeboats and a makeshift raft in 40-foot seas.

Nearly 140 years later in November 2003, Odyssey Marine Exploration began the archaeological excavation of the SS Republic. State-of-the-art electronics and recovery equipment, revealed a dazzling carpet of coins hidden on the ocean floor at the stern of the ship, near the ship’s rudder. The Recovery team brought to the surface a stunning treasure trove of over 51,000 U.S. gold and silver coins. What makes the SS Republic shipwreck treasure so special, was the discovery of a large quantity of 1861 Liberty Seated Half Dollars, which proved to be the only U.S. coin ever struck by three different governments at the start of the Civil War.


Drayton's comment on the Shield Nickel was because they became known as "Rebel Nickels" due to their design.


Five-Cent Shield Nickel

The five-cent piece came about for the same reasons the three-cent nickel was created in 1865, to help redeem and replace the five-cent notes of fractional currency. The Act of May 16, 1866, ushered in what would become one of the mainstays of our country’s coinage, the future 5 cent nickel. These coins could be purchased in “Lawful Currency” of the U.S. and it prohibited the further issuance of fractional paper valued at less than 10 cents. The Nickel was made a legal tender in amounts up to $1 and then could be redeemed for “National Currency” in sums not less than $100. The new coins were accepted immediately, though a smaller coinage of half-dimes continued until eliminated by law in 1873.

This coin became to be known as “Longacre’s Nickel” which like his previous two-cent piece, features a Union shield on the obverse (also known as a Shield Nickel), draped by a laurel wreath with two crossed arrows behind the shield at the bottom, with the date below. At the top of the coin, around the edge, was the motto, “In God We Trust.” But below that, on top of the wreath, was an ancient style cross of uncertain origin which became quite controversial, and was nicknamed, the “Tombstone Nickel”. The reverse of the five-cent nickel was also somewhat controversial. It featured a large numeral 5 surrounded by a circle of 13 stars, with rays flowing out from among the stars in 1866 to 1867. There were production problems striking the rays, so in 1867 the rays were removed through the end of the series. There was also an issue with the public, because the “Stars and Bars” was reminiscent of the recently defeated Confederacy, which earned this new coin a new nickname… the “Rebel Nickel.”


You need to learn to read slower and more carefully. Some coins were minted but never put into circulation during the life of the Confederacy. Nothing in your quoted post refutes anything that I said in my post. Drayton clearly confused a U.S. nickel with a non-existent Confederate coin because of the stars on the reverse. I watched the entire series, did you?
~Texas Jay

https://www.pcgs.com/News/Confederate-Coinage-A-Short-lived-Dream

 

Ol' Kentuck

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Yeah, Gary Drayton. Isn't he the guy on the History Channel's The Curse of Oak Island and The Curse of Civil War Gold? He's the one who claimed that either a V nickel or a Shield nickel (which had stars on the reverse) was definitely a Confederate coin on The Curse of Civil War Gold. The problem with that claim, that was allowed to go uncorrected, was that the Confederacy never issued any coinage. During the same segment, he claimed that of all the several metal detectors on the field that day, only his Minelab could detect gold. ha. That lie was never corrected either.
Gary Drayton may be the "best treasure hunter around" his county but he's not even among the Top 20 in the world.
~Texas Jay

You need to learn to read slower and more carefully. Some coins were minted but never put into circulation during the life of the Confederacy. Nothing in your quoted post refutes anything that I said in my post. Drayton clearly confused a U.S. nickel with a non-existent Confederate coin because of the stars on the reverse. I watched the entire series, did you?
~Texas Jay

https://www.pcgs.com/News/Confederate-Coinage-A-Short-lived-Dream





I reckon I'm slow enough ta keep up with You, thank ye, but thanks fer thinkin of me. :laughing7:

I might jest be a li'l ahead of ye in the comprehension department tho, my ego not being nearly as well developed as yer own. :wink:


https://www.money.org/blog/ConfederateCoinsMeisky


In January of 1861, the Federal government produced about 330,000 silver (actually 90 percent silver and 10 percent copper) half dollars at New Orleans. When Louisiana seceded the state took over the mint and continued production, turning out about 124,000 of the coins. They used the original die (the die is what actually creates the image on the blank coin) so their coins still said “United States of America.” The Confederate Treasury Department then took over and minted another 963,000 United States half dollars. Coins of this period contained approximately the amount of metal equal to the face value of the coin and these Louisiana- and Confederate-produced coins had the same amount of silver as the U.S.-produced coins and were thus just as valuable. There is no way to determine if an individual coin was minted by the U.S., Louisiana, or the Confederacy as the same workers used the same die and machines and the coins had the same amount of silver.

Louisiana and the Confederacy also minted United States double eagle ($20) gold coins in New Orleans. The product runs for these coins was about 5,000 by the U.S., 9,750 by Louisiana, and 2991 by the Confederacy. The South also minted a total of approximately 10,000 United States gold $1 and $5 coins at Charlotte and Dahlonega before running out of stock and closing down these two operations.
 

ink

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hey aganist the wind instead of bragging how about offering some advice my detecting expierence has you by 4 years. bless please tell the newbies about the bfo, pi, tr, vlf, detectors please keep honking your own horn by the way if you have a metal detecting question please ask .
 
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Irishgoldhound

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Gary Drayton. He’s not among the top twenty? Oh no! So whats your point? Guess he don’t know **** then according to you or if you’re just being a self righteous beeep.
 
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Texas Jay

Texas Jay

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Gary Drayton. He’s not among the top twenty? Oh no! So whats your point? Guess he don’t know **** then according to you or if you’re just being a self righteous beeep.

I gave you the reasons in my reply. He misleads people with the blessing of the History Channel by telling them that only Minelab detectors can find gold and he doesn't know the difference between a U.S. nickel and a nonexistent C.S.A. coin.
~Texas Jay
 
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Texas Jay

Texas Jay

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Feb 11, 2006
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I reckon I'm slow enough ta keep up with You, thank ye, but thanks fer thinkin of me. :laughing7:

I might jest be a li'l ahead of ye in the comprehension department tho, my ego not being nearly as well developed as yer own. :wink:


https://www.money.org/blog/ConfederateCoinsMeisky


In January of 1861, the Federal government produced about 330,000 silver (actually 90 percent silver and 10 percent copper) half dollars at New Orleans. When Louisiana seceded the state took over the mint and continued production, turning out about 124,000 of the coins. They used the original die (the die is what actually creates the image on the blank coin) so their coins still said “United States of America.” The Confederate Treasury Department then took over and minted another 963,000 United States half dollars. Coins of this period contained approximately the amount of metal equal to the face value of the coin and these Louisiana- and Confederate-produced coins had the same amount of silver as the U.S.-produced coins and were thus just as valuable. There is no way to determine if an individual coin was minted by the U.S., Louisiana, or the Confederacy as the same workers used the same die and machines and the coins had the same amount of silver.

Louisiana and the Confederacy also minted United States double eagle ($20) gold coins in New Orleans. The product runs for these coins was about 5,000 by the U.S., 9,750 by Louisiana, and 2991 by the Confederacy. The South also minted a total of approximately 10,000 United States gold $1 and $5 coins at Charlotte and Dahlonega before running out of stock and closing down these two operations.

Apparently you don't know the difference between the United States and the Confederate States of America. The Confederacy issued NO coins of their own, only continued minting U.S. coins.
~Texas Jay
 

Irishgoldhound

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Would love to see the video of him saying “only Minelabs can find gold”. Upload the video and post it. If he said exactly that I’m sure it’s not what he meant maybe in other words he meant that they are better with multi frequency not in so many words. Some people wanna bash others the minute they make a mistake or could be wrong about one instance. Does that make him a liar or a terrible treasure hunter? Hardly! Far better than most I’m sure. Also I’m talking about his beach hunting knowledge to begin with and how his techniques are explained in his books, videos and seminars. What books or videos have you published?? Your just bashing someone who’s highly respected in the field and very knowledgeable it’s ok you don’t measure up yet and that’s prob why you have to bash. Keep swinging your 250 and stop disrespecting a highly respected treasure hunter! He’s got far more yrs of swinging experience than you I’m sure.
 

ZR2guy

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Gotta get the coil over the target first, no matter what detector you swing or how long you've been swinging it.:icon_thumleft:
 

Minelab Matt

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I have the equinox and AT MAX the max signals are clear seoeraton much better easier to use hands down better machine
LMAO...AT Max a better machine...thats hilarious.
 

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