Cremation Tags

LawrencetheMDer

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In 2018, 53% of Americans were cremated instead of buried. The International Cemetery, Cremation & Funeral Association (ICCFA) Identification Guidelines state;



Funeral homes should implement a reliable system for the identification of human remains to give consumers assurance that safeguards are in place to minimize the incidence of misidentification. Further, in the case of a disinterment, or if a flood, earthquake, or other natural disaster disturb the place of interment, the identification and re interment of the human remains would be facilitated by this system.”



Thus, the cremation tag came into existance.

Cremation ovens get up to 1400 – 1800°F in order to break down the bone and teeth. On the other hand, 304 stainless steel is the preferred metal for cremation tags and has a melting point of 2000+°F. This allows the tag to go into the oven with the remains and stay with them through the whole process; and, be finally deposited in the Gulf, for example, and recovered by a Metal Detectorist.



I’d like to share some of my found cremation tags and show just some of the variety that exists. Because I know for a fact that cremation tags are bad luck if kept, I always return the tags to the Gulf once I photo document the find.



I have found 3 main types of cremation tags; the most common is the 304 SS type as noted above that is about 1 ¼” in diameter. The second kind of cremation tag is a thin brass plate of ½” x 1 ¾”, and the third type is a thin brass plate measuring ¾” x 2” (approximate).



Some of the 304 SS cremation tags are shown below from various cities including; East Ridgelawn Crematory in Clifton NJ, Southeastern Crematory in Clearwater Fl, Schoedinger Crematory in Columbus Ohio, Restland Crematory, Southeastern Crematory, and Tri-county Crematory. Finally there is a 304 SS without the name of the crematory or location.
Clearwater Cremation Tag b.jpg
Columbus 2.jpg
Columbus reverse 2.jpg
East Ridgeland Cremation Tag 2020.jpg
Restland 2 2019.jpg
Reverse Restland.jpg
Southeastern Cremation tag.jpg
Tri county cremation tag.jpg
No Name Cremation tag.jpg

Regarding the smaller thin brass plate cremation tags;
There is one from the C & S Crematory, and 2 with just serial numbers.
East Ridgeland Cremation Tag 2020.jpg
Reverse Restland.jpg
No Name Cremation tag.jpg
C and S Crematory tag 022119.jpg
Cremation tag Rectangle.jpg
Rec cremation tag.jpg


Regarding the larger thin brass type of crematory tag, there are 3 from the Palm State Crematory service in Clearwater Florida.

Palm State 3.jpg
Palm State 2 2019.jpg
Palm State Cremation tagg.jpg


Finally, it might be noteworthy that when you find a cremation tag there may be valuable gold nearby; dental gold that is, including charred but intact dental crowns and small dark balls of melted gold dental fillings.

Happy hunting.
 
Upvote 4

crashbandicoot

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They don,t creep me out or anything,but they should be returned to the sea or place where found out of a respect for the dead.No problem with photoing them for your own info. I wouldn,t want to hunt for any dental gold or stuff like that if I knew it was near a ashes dump,again just respect for the dead,but I don,t condemn anyone who does.
 

eyemustdigtreasure

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In 2018, 53% of Americans were cremated instead of buried. The International Cemetery, Cremation & Funeral Association (ICCFA) Identification Guidelines state;



Funeral homes should implement a reliable system for the identification of human remains to give consumers assurance that safeguards are in place to minimize the incidence of misidentification. Further, in the case of a disinterment, or if a flood, earthquake, or other natural disaster disturb the place of interment, the identification and re interment of the human remains would be facilitated by this system.”



Thus, the cremation tag came into existance.

Cremation ovens get up to 1400 – 1800°F in order to break down the bone and teeth. On the other hand, 304 stainless steel is the preferred metal for cremation tags and has a melting point of 2000+°F. This allows the tag to go into the oven with the remains and stay with them through the whole process; and, be finally deposited in the Gulf, for example, and recovered by a Metal Detectorist.



I’d like to share some of my found cremation tags and show just some of the variety that exists. Because I know for a fact that cremation tags are bad luck if kept, I always return the tags to the Gulf once I photo document the find.



I have found 3 main types of cremation tags; the most common is the 304 SS type as noted above that is about 1 ¼” in diameter. The second kind of cremation tag is a thin brass plate of ½” x 1 ¾”, and the third type is a thin brass plate measuring ¾” x 2” (approximate).



Some of the 304 SS cremation tags are shown below from various cities including; East Ridgelawn Crematory in Clifton NJ, Southeastern Crematory in Clearwater Fl, Schoedinger Crematory in Columbus Ohio, Restland Crematory, Southeastern Crematory, and Tri-county Crematory. Finally there is a 304 SS without the name of the crematory or location.
View attachment 2019942 View attachment 2019943 View attachment 2019944 View attachment 2019945 View attachment 2019946 View attachment 2019947 View attachment 2019948 View attachment 2019949 View attachment 2019950
Regarding the smaller thin brass plate cremation tags;
There is one from the C & S Crematory, and 2 with just serial numbers.
View attachment 2019945 View attachment 2019947 View attachment 2019950 View attachment 2019952 View attachment 2019953 View attachment 2019954

Regarding the larger thin brass type of crematory tag, there are 3 from the Palm State Crematory service in Clearwater Florida.

View attachment 2019955 View attachment 2019956 View attachment 2019957

Finally, it might be noteworthy that when you find a cremation tag there may be valuable gold nearby; dental gold that is, including charred but intact dental crowns and small dark balls of melted gold dental fillings.

Happy hunting.
I have found one tag, that was up against the base of a tree.
After putting little thought or time into it, I quickly buried the thing, right back where it came from - I then noted bone frags in the dirt...!!
R.I.P........! :angel9:
 

Cuda74

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I have found one tag, that was up against the base of a tree.
After putting little thought or time into it, I quickly buried the thing, right back where it came from - I then noted bone frags in the dirt...!!
R.I.P........! :angel9:
I've only found one and that was on a recent trip to Atlantic Beach from the Westover Cremation Service. Buried it right back. Finding one was cool but I don't need to find more of them...
 

Diggen It 1900

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That was very interesting to me, I had no idea they had creamation tags. It is kind of creepy. I will one day be creamated also. If someone finds my tag or dental fillings they can do as they wish with them as I will no longer need them.

Thanks for posting, found it interesting.
Brian
 

Gare

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I have a friend that found 7 cremation tags in one season. he was detecting shores of the gulf in Fl. Seems a lot of people dump the ashes in the gulf and the waves wash the tags up on the shore
 

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