Eagle Sword Pommel

SW_PA_Chad

Greenie
Apr 22, 2022
14
88
Pittsburgh PA
Detector(s) used
Equinox 800
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
I found this near a hand pump well at a late 1800's built farm house. I scrubbed it with some baking soda and vinegar thinking it was a cane or flag topper. It was about 6 inches deep. After looking it over, it appears to be the pommel of a sword. Wondered if this looked genuine to the experts out there. I found some other coins and relics in the area. The oldest coin was a fatty indian. Unfortunately I couldn't find any more of the sword. Thanks for looking.
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Upvote 45

Digger RJ

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Aug 24, 2017
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I found this near a hand pump well at a late 1800's built farm house. I scrubbed it with some baking soda and vinegar thinking it was a cane or flag topper. It was about 6 inches deep. After looking it over, it appears to be the pommel of a sword. Wondered if this looked genuine to the experts out there. I found some other coins and relics in the area. The oldest coin was a fatty indian. Unfortunately I couldn't find any more of the sword. Thanks for looking.
View attachment 2049077
Very Cool!!!Congrats!!!
 

CoinsAndThings

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Dec 4, 2020
75
154
Utah
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That's really cool! I'm no expert but I don't believe it's a sword pommel. Unless it's maybe a sword cane. To me the angle looks wrong. It would make for an awkward hold. Unless there's a piece missing that would change that.
 

Red-Coat

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Dec 23, 2019
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It would be great if this is a sword pommel, but I think it's from a walking cane.

The construction for attachment is the same as for horse hame knobs, with that spur projection and screw hole providing reinforcement against snapping of the wood to which it was attached. It was also a construction used for walking cane handles made in the form of horse hames, but those usually have a relatively plain knob or finial. Eagle-head cane handles more usually have a simple sleeve for attachment (or are threaded). I haven't seen a cane handle which combines both the eagle head and the hame-type attachment, but wouldn't doubt that they exist.

if you Google "horse hame knob" and "hame walking stick" you'll see where I'm coming from.
 

Florida Finder

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Dec 17, 2020
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Southern States of America
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I found this near a hand pump well at a late 1800's built farm house. I scrubbed it with some baking soda and vinegar thinking it was a cane or flag topper. It was about 6 inches deep. After looking it over, it appears to be the pommel of a sword. Wondered if this looked genuine to the experts out there. I found some other coins and relics in the area. The oldest coin was a fatty indian. Unfortunately I couldn't find any more of the sword. Thanks for looking.
View attachment 2049077
Beautiful recovery! Keep us posted on the ID
 

pa-dirt_nc-sand

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Apr 18, 2016
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South Western PA
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Congrats! That’s a great piece. I found a similar design in Allegheny County a few years back at an old cellar hole, but it had a round opening and ended up being a CW officers saddle pommel. Yours definitely looks like CW sword pommel to me!
 

Sandog

Hero Member
Nov 27, 2017
561
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Treasure coast
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I found this near a hand pump well at a late 1800's built farm house. I scrubbed it with some baking soda and vinegar thinking it was a cane or flag topper. It was about 6 inches deep. After looking it over, it appears to be the pommel of a sword. Wondered if this looked genuine to the experts out there. I found some other coins and relics in the area. The oldest coin was a fatty indian. Unfortunately I couldn't find any more of the sword. Thanks for looking.
View attachment 2049077
Could this piece not have attached to the palmer surface of a sword handle/grip? Beautiful find no matter what it turns out to be.
 
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SW_PA_Chad

Greenie
Apr 22, 2022
14
88
Pittsburgh PA
Detector(s) used
Equinox 800
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
  • Thread Starter
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  • #12
Congrats! That’s a great piece. I found a similar design in Allegheny County a few years back at an old cellar hole, but it had a round opening and ended up being a CW officers saddle pommel. Yours definitely looks like CW sword pommel to me!
Thanks. I would love to see the saddle pommel you found if you get a chance to post it. I'm in the same area.
 
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SW_PA_Chad

Greenie
Apr 22, 2022
14
88
Pittsburgh PA
Detector(s) used
Equinox 800
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
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It would be great if this is a sword pommel, but I think it's from a walking cane.

The construction for attachment is the same as for horse hame knobs, with that spur projection and screw hole providing reinforcement against snapping of the wood to which it was attached. It was also a construction used for walking cane handles made in the form of horse hames, but those usually have a relatively plain knob or finial. Eagle-head cane handles more usually have a simple sleeve for attachment (or are threaded). I haven't seen a cane handle which combines both the eagle head and the hame-type attachment, but wouldn't doubt that they exist.

if you Google "horse hame knob" and "hame walking stick" you'll see where I'm coming from.
Thanks for the informative reply. It is very similar to a horse hame. I'm pretty sure I have it figured out. I will post some more pictures later.
 

pa-dirt_nc-sand

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Apr 18, 2016
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South Western PA
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ACE 250 with DD coil
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Thanks. I would love to see the saddle pommel you found if you get a chance to post it. I'm in the same area.
This one was found 10 miles south of Pittsburgh. SW PA is a great place to metal detect. Lots of history here.
 

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BuckleBoy

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Jun 12, 2006
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The distinguishing feature of an eagle sword pommel is the place where the knuckle bow connected under the beak of the eagle. Walking stick toppers will never have a hole there.

Your eagle sword pommel is German made, 1820-1840 period. I recommend the following books, one of which is specifically about eagle sword pommels:

E. Andrew Mowbray's Eagle Pommel Swords: the early years

and his son's work with Norm Flayderman: The Medicus Collection

Congrats, it’s a great find.
 
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SW_PA_Chad

Greenie
Apr 22, 2022
14
88
Pittsburgh PA
Detector(s) used
Equinox 800
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
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The distinguishing feature of an eagle sword pommel is the place where the knuckle bow connected under the beak of the eagle. Walking stick toppers will never have a hole there.

Your eagle sword pommel is German made, 1820-1840 period. I recommend the following books, one of which is specifically about eagle sword pommels:

E. Andrew Mowbray's Eagle Pommel Swords: the early years

and his son's work with Norm Flayderman: The Medicus Collection

Congrats, it’s a great find.
Wow thanks. Appreciate the id! I will check out the books you mention.
 

callmez

Jr. Member
May 25, 2014
91
141
East Tennessee
Detector(s) used
Equinox 800
Tesoro Vaquero
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E. Andrew Mowbray's Eagle Pommel Swords: the early years
A really superb book and absolutely the go-to for identifying your find. There are a few more general books on American swords that might be helpful (including the Mowbray/Flayderman book) but BuckleBoy is correct about the general time frame and that eliminates the books on Rev War and Civil War swords and makes the others more of a longshot. The Eagle Pommel Swords book is the one you want -- perhaps you can get it through interlibrary loan?
 

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