East TN arrowhead

cafvol99

Greenie
Jul 31, 2019
11
12
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Looking to get a little information on an arrowhead I found roughly 10 years ago. I found this arrowhead in a creek off the french broad river in knoxville tennessee.
 

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Upvote 3

SportsmanAll

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Mar 21, 2018
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My first thought was a modern replica.....the way it was made is very very similar to points made by jigs with copper tools. A pass of Wide long flakes across the top, and then an extreme angle sharpening process and boom. Done. I am no expert, but before I even read the comments my first thought “it looks like one I’d buy from my state fair”. But like I said. I am no judge!
 

Twitch

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Feb 1, 2010
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what exactly tells you for 100% fact that it's not old or ancient?
The material isn’t from North America, the style doesn’t match any North American artifact and the condition is inconsistent with a point more than 20 years old. 100% not ancient.

while a consensus opinion does not make something a fact, every single credible person in this field will support the points i’ve Just made.
 
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cafvol99

Greenie
Jul 31, 2019
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would you say this one attached is also a fake Screen Shot 2019-07-31 at 10.55.28 PM.png
 

ToddsPoint

Silver Member
Mar 2, 2018
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Unusual that the point has left hand beveling. Normally, early archaic pieces have right hand beveling. Dalton is the exception. It does resemble India jasper. Gary
 

scotto

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Dec 23, 2006
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Im obviously no expert otherwise i wouldnt be posting here asking about it, however, based on where i found this im one thousand percent confident it's not fake.

You have already heard from experts here already, some with a lifetime of collecting and study. Nobody is doubting that you found it, but the material, form, and knapping are all features of a point made in India. Your point is modern-made.

i suppose i will take it to a local professional to get it checked out in person.

Good idea. But I can tell you that Joshua Ream and the Grim Reaper most likely know far more about points and types than any local "professional" you might see.
 

Quartzite Keith

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Dec 17, 2018
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Probably should have asked this from the start, but: Are the notches/base ground? Also, the one side that looks flat, is there a concavity on that side?
 

sawmill man

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Jun 12, 2016
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Sad that people are salting places , my brother was a victom twice ,came back from a western trip and found a few in a mcdonalds flower bed . and a really big one sticking out of the mud at cumberland gap. all looked close to the ones picured.
 

MosesOfTheSouth

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Apr 4, 2014
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hey, just wanted to say welcome to cafvol99. if you are still located in east tn, i'm a bit west of you on the plateau.

not sure from your posts if artifact hunting is a hobby for you, but Tennessee is definitely a great place for it. six or seven years back i found a beautiful point, freshly broke in half. not by a plow, but by that mornings deer traffic. which rekindled


.......... a childhood growing up on the bluffs, finding points and flakes. family didn't have a tv.. until i was in sixth grade..times previous to that (in retrospect), were some awesome years. making animal traps/bows/arrows/spears/clubs.

.......cooking killed creatures on little fires.




always hoping..:piratehand: my grandfather's research into our ancestry/genealogy would uncover some lost Native American branch of the family tree. obviously so i wouldn't be a poser singing



but i digress..




some members have a huge amount of knowledge, gathered over decades in the field. that knowledge and experience is something i personally really have appreciated on here, and other forums.
seems upon reaching that level of expertise, it's easier for them to appraise an object with a high percentage of personal certainty.


I can't personally say anything 100%, specially over the web w/ pictures only.

i will say: seeing posts from my neck of the woods is always great. local/regional comparison of finds is very compelling.

looking at the first post some of the cracks and crevices on the point appear to hold greenish build-up (in that group, the second picture is a good example using the magnification function) .
in later pictures you (op) have cleaned the point a bit more ? the stuff that i'd associate w/light to moderate creek time for our area looks to be wiped off . so, was your initial discovery something freshly eroded or in a waterway with minimal flow?

any ways. hope you figure it out. Tennessee has some wild flint/chert types. if you work on identifying the material that it is made of, it will be very unlikely your question won't be answered.
 

southfork

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Jun 15, 2014
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I know nothing about your area but the story is suspect . I hope you prove me wrong but I think the same group made this one out of the same material weird right ?
 

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OP
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cafvol99

Greenie
Jul 31, 2019
11
12
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #35
hey, just wanted to say welcome to cafvol99. if you are still located in east tn, i'm a bit west of you on the plateau.

not sure from your posts if artifact hunting is a hobby for you, but Tennessee is definitely a great place for it. six or seven years back i found a beautiful point, freshly broke in half. not by a plow, but by that mornings deer traffic. which rekindled


.......... a childhood growing up on the bluffs, finding points and flakes. family didn't have a tv.. until i was in sixth grade..times previous to that (in retrospect), were some awesome years. making animal traps/bows/arrows/spears/clubs.

.......cooking killed creatures on little fires.




always hoping..:piratehand: my grandfather's research into our ancestry/genealogy would uncover some lost Native American branch of the family tree. obviously so i wouldn't be a poser singing



but i digress..




some members have a huge amount of knowledge, gathered over decades in the field. that knowledge and experience is something i personally really have appreciated on here, and other forums.
seems upon reaching that level of expertise, it's easier for them to appraise an object with a high percentage of personal certainty.


I can't personally say anything 100%, specially over the web w/ pictures only.

i will say: seeing posts from my neck of the woods is always great. local/regional comparison of finds is very compelling.

looking at the first post some of the cracks and crevices on the point appear to hold greenish build-up (in that group, the second picture is a good example using the magnification function) .
in later pictures you (op) have cleaned the point a bit more ? the stuff that i'd associate w/light to moderate creek time for our area looks to be wiped off . so, was your initial discovery something freshly eroded or in a waterway with minimal flow?

any ways. hope you figure it out. Tennessee has some wild flint/chert types. if you work on identifying the material that it is made of, it will be very unlikely your question won't be answered.
the greenish buildup was mud/dirt that had never been cleaned off and yes i used a brush to clean it before posting the second photos. i found it sometime between 1999-2000 in a slow moving creekbed that branched off from a larger creek coming off of the french broad river in east tn. the creek would flood when the river would come up though and the point was covered by about an 1'' of mud. never searched for arrowheads before it was found.
 

billb

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Sep 23, 2010
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Looking to get a little information on an arrowhead I found roughly 10 years ago. I found this arrowhead in a creek off the french broad river in knoxville tennessee.
Congratulations on your beautiful recovery
 

uniface

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Jun 4, 2009
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Grey & red combo (with or without yellow) could easily be Paoli chert, which was pretty widely traveled in the Early Archaic era. Gary Fogelman found a platter biface (trade blank) of it @ the Warrior Sorings site in Norhumberland County, Penna.

FWIW
 

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