✅ SOLVED Family pocket watch

JVA5th

Silver Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,520
10,107
Atwater, CA
Detector(s) used
Dues XP, AT Pro, Whites TRX pinpointer, Sampson Ground Shark shovel
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I was curious about this pocket watch, it was passed through the family to my father. Looks to have been a fairly nice one. If anyone knows a little about it I'd appreciate the information.
 

Attachments

  • 20211226_110049.jpg
    20211226_110049.jpg
    1.5 MB · Views: 73
  • 20211226_110101.jpg
    20211226_110101.jpg
    1.6 MB · Views: 47
  • 20211226_110136.jpg
    20211226_110136.jpg
    1.6 MB · Views: 47
  • 20211226_110145.jpg
    20211226_110145.jpg
    1.6 MB · Views: 47
  • mir_20211226_110219.jpg
    mir_20211226_110219.jpg
    307.9 KB · Views: 57
  • mir_20211226_110239.jpg
    mir_20211226_110239.jpg
    372.9 KB · Views: 54
  • mir_20211226_110303.jpg
    mir_20211226_110303.jpg
    301.1 KB · Views: 56
Solution
Nice watch. It’s the Illinois Watch Company’s ‘Bunn Special’ Model 9, made around 1925 in a run of 1,000 watches from a total of 169,440 produced. Railroad grade.
OP
JVA5th

JVA5th

Silver Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,520
10,107
Atwater, CA
Detector(s) used
Dues XP, AT Pro, Whites TRX pinpointer, Sampson Ground Shark shovel
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
Nice watch. It’s the Illinois Watch Company’s ‘Bunn Special’ Model 9, made around 1925 in a run of 1,000 watches from a total of 169,440 produced. Railroad grade.
As always Red-Coat thank you. What does railroad grade mean?
 
Upvote 3
OP
JVA5th

JVA5th

Silver Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,520
10,107
Atwater, CA
Detector(s) used
Dues XP, AT Pro, Whites TRX pinpointer, Sampson Ground Shark shovel
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #5
Nice heirloom! There looks to be a lot of engraving below and beside 7777802 on the back. Hard to read. Nice ID by Red-Coat.
It does have a lot of engravings on the inside I'll try to get some pictures for you guys
 
Upvote 2
OP
JVA5th

JVA5th

Silver Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,520
10,107
Atwater, CA
Detector(s) used
Dues XP, AT Pro, Whites TRX pinpointer, Sampson Ground Shark shovel
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #6
Wasn't a fun process but did the best I could do with the engravings in regards to getting pictures.
 

Attachments

  • mir_20211226_114248.jpg
    mir_20211226_114248.jpg
    321.4 KB · Views: 32
  • mir_20211226_114305.jpg
    mir_20211226_114305.jpg
    341.8 KB · Views: 31
  • mir_20211226_114322.jpg
    mir_20211226_114322.jpg
    206.6 KB · Views: 29
  • mir_20211226_114351.jpg
    mir_20211226_114351.jpg
    240.8 KB · Views: 31
  • mir_20211226_114407.jpg
    mir_20211226_114407.jpg
    225 KB · Views: 25
  • mir_20211226_114529.jpg
    mir_20211226_114529.jpg
    223.7 KB · Views: 28
Upvote 6
OP
JVA5th

JVA5th

Silver Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,520
10,107
Atwater, CA
Detector(s) used
Dues XP, AT Pro, Whites TRX pinpointer, Sampson Ground Shark shovel
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #8
You're most welcome. 'Railroad Grade' is a superior quality of movement designed to keep more accurate time in the presence of magnetic fields and generally having temperature compensation too.
Thank you, that's nice to know
 
Upvote 2

Tony in SC

Gold Member
Jun 8, 2006
5,303
6,088
Upstate South Carolina
Detector(s) used
Whites, Minelab, Tesoro, and custom machines
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
I was curious about this pocket watch, it was passed through the family to my father. Looks to have been a fairly nice one. If anyone knows a little about it I'd appreciate the information.
That is a very collectable piece! Red Coat is right on but a RR movement also had to be accurate in 5 or 6 positions (maybe marked 5p or 6p on the movement). The small etchings in the back case are from the times it was cleaned or repaired. The company was sold to Hamilton in the late 20's and finally ended up in Russia.
 
Upvote 8
OP
JVA5th

JVA5th

Silver Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,520
10,107
Atwater, CA
Detector(s) used
Dues XP, AT Pro, Whites TRX pinpointer, Sampson Ground Shark shovel
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #11
That is a very collectable piece! Red Coat is right on but a RR movement also had to be accurate in 5 or 6 positions (maybe marked 5p or 6p on the movement). The small etchings in the back case are from the times it was cleaned or repaired. The company was sold to Hamilton in the late 20's and finally ended up in Russia.
Thank you for the information I greatly appreciate it
 
Upvote 2

pepperj

Gold Member
Feb 3, 2009
25,266
77,897
Detector(s) used
Deus, Minelab 3030, E-Trac,
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
I'm a little late to the party John-internet issues/time.
Though the question was answered by Red Coat of what is a Railway Grade Watch
Here is your beautiful Grandfather's Watch model explained in detail.
What a keeper :headbang:


Mechanically speaking, almost all 1900’s railroad watches shared a number of performance and reliability enhancing features. Most had a fixed regulator to avoid timekeeping variation from impact (A), a double roller balance wheel to avoid going out of action (often called overbanking) (B), 19 or more jewels to reduce friction and increase consistency of the gear train (C), timekeeping adjustment in 5 or more positions to make sure the watch kept accurate time regardless of orientation (D), and adjustment for temperature to ensure accuracy in a variety of climates (E). Many railroad watches had solid gold or gold plated gear trains (F) and jewel settings (G) to reduce the effects of magnetism as well as reduce tarnishing, and later watches had features such as magnetically resistant balance wheels, Elinvar hairsprings, adjustments for isochronism, and advanced cap jewel covers (H).

Screen Shot 2021-12-27 at 8.42.59 AM.png
 
Upvote 10
OP
JVA5th

JVA5th

Silver Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,520
10,107
Atwater, CA
Detector(s) used
Dues XP, AT Pro, Whites TRX pinpointer, Sampson Ground Shark shovel
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #15
I'm a little late to the party John-internet issues/time.
Though the question was answered by Red Coat of what is a Railway Grade Watch
Here is your beautiful Grandfather's Watch model explained in detail.
What a keeper :headbang:


Mechanically speaking, almost all 1900’s railroad watches shared a number of performance and reliability enhancing features. Most had a fixed regulator to avoid timekeeping variation from impact (A), a double roller balance wheel to avoid going out of action (often called overbanking) (B), 19 or more jewels to reduce friction and increase consistency of the gear train (C), timekeeping adjustment in 5 or more positions to make sure the watch kept accurate time regardless of orientation (D), and adjustment for temperature to ensure accuracy in a variety of climates (E). Many railroad watches had solid gold or gold plated gear trains (F) and jewel settings (G) to reduce the effects of magnetism as well as reduce tarnishing, and later watches had features such as magnetically resistant balance wheels, Elinvar hairsprings, adjustments for isochronism, and advanced cap jewel covers (H).

View attachment 1998813
Thank you for the information, all good stuff to know. I enjoy the intricacy of these old pocket watches and learning more about them is always awesome to me.
 
Upvote 2

pepperj

Gold Member
Feb 3, 2009
25,266
77,897
Detector(s) used
Deus, Minelab 3030, E-Trac,
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
Thank you for the information, all good stuff to know. I enjoy the intricacy of these old pocket watches and learning more about them is always awesome to me.
My inlaw had the amazing ability of being able to completely take one apart, repair/clean reassemble and it work be like new.
Watched him for hrs at his bench, and going to the pocket watch club meetings.
 
Upvote 4
OP
JVA5th

JVA5th

Silver Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,520
10,107
Atwater, CA
Detector(s) used
Dues XP, AT Pro, Whites TRX pinpointer, Sampson Ground Shark shovel
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #17
My inlaw had the amazing ability of being able to completely take one apart, repair/clean reassemble and it work be like new.
Watched him for hrs at his bench, and going to the pocket watch club meetings.
I can't even comprehend how people can do that. I'd never be able to remember all the things you need to know to do that. I'm going to take this one into my local jeweler and get it running. It appears to be a piece worth getting it done.
 
Upvote 4

oldmxrat

Bronze Member
Oct 25, 2020
1,607
3,991
Western Nevada
🥇 Banner finds
1
Detector(s) used
Garrett ACE 400, Nokta Simplex+, Nokta Legend
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
That's a very cool piece and definitely worth getting into working order. The internals are breathtaking works of art in those watches!
 
Upvote 2

Tpmetal

Silver Member
Jan 4, 2017
4,121
6,820
Western ny
Detector(s) used
equinox 800, Whites mx sport, Garrot carrot, bounty hunter time ranger
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I can't even comprehend how people can do that. I'd never be able to remember all the things you need to know to do that. I'm going to take this one into my local jeweler and get it running. It appears to be a piece worth getting it done.
While I completely support getting it fixed, do know that in most cases with pocket watches it will usually cost more to fix than it will be worth. This shouldn't matter as it is from family. Also added bonus for being a railroad grade, which sometimes beat out that cost to fix vrs value problem. That being said I have spent a few thousand dollars getting as many of my collection fixed and into good running watches as I can....with only one being worth more than I paid to have it repaired...and many of my running watches cost just as much to just clean and service as they are worth let alone if they needed any serious repair. Still I just can't let em get junked by someone....I feel compelled to save them. Have been considering learning the art so I can save some cash....but once you move beyond cleaning, the amount of hard to find specialty tools needed for such a small item is actually mind boggling.
 
Upvote 3
OP
JVA5th

JVA5th

Silver Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,520
10,107
Atwater, CA
Detector(s) used
Dues XP, AT Pro, Whites TRX pinpointer, Sampson Ground Shark shovel
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #20
While I completely support getting it fixed, do know that in most cases with pocket watches it will usually cost more to fix than it will be worth. This shouldn't matter as it is from family. Also added bonus for being a railroad grade, which sometimes beat out that cost to fix vrs value problem. That being said I have spent a few thousand dollars getting as many of my collection fixed and into good running watches as I can....with only one being worth more than I paid to have it repaired...and many of my running watches cost just as much to just clean and service as they are worth let alone if they needed any serious repair. Still I just can't let em get junked by someone....I feel compelled to save them. Have been considering learning the art so I can save some cash....but once you move beyond cleaning, the amount of hard to find specialty tools needed for such a small item is actually mind boggling.
I lack the brain power for that. I'd never be able to remember all that. Just don't have a brain good at the mechanical type of things.
 
Upvote 2

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top