Fuererhand 175 Super Baby

tamrock

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Your probably wondering WHATS a Fuererhand? I got this yesterday at my little church charity shop. Everything is really cheap there except the one lady does inspect the jewelry really well. This was 3 bucks and dirty as heck and cobwebs inside the globe. I cleaned it up and got the rusty moving parts of the burner oiled and loosened up and wiped it clean using this bio degradable vegi-based penetrating oil I have. The wick was all rusty looking, so I soaked it in dish soap and water and rinsed it all out and put it in the air frying over to dry it all completely of moisture. Went to Wal-Mart and got a bottle of clean burning lamp oil out of the candle selection aisle and lite it up. Burns like a charm. These vintage Fuererhand lanterns made in W. Germany do have a collector base and folks will pay upwards of $75.00+ for one like this in this condition. Fuererhand also made a smaller lantern than this called the ATOM 75, which were widely used by the German military during WWII. Lanterns of that era are worth even more or any ATOM lantern would be a great find at a trift store, flea market or yard-sale in just about any condition. I'm not really sure how old this one is, but I'm estimate maybe from the 1950s to 1960s.
 

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tamrock

tamrock

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Interesting find. There was of course no "West Germany" until after the war when the country was partitioned in 1949 and remained so until re-unification

Interesting find. There was of course no "West Germany" until after the war when the country was partitioned in 1949 and remained so until re-unification in 1990
Indeed. A span of interesting times that was. I recall being in grammar school and hearing quite a bit of talk about this Iron Curtain. As I got older I better understood what that was, but as a youngster it made no sense to me to make a curtain out of iron
??? The fuererhand name is still around, but they only produce one size of lantern today and it's called the 275 Baby and I found this one about 3 years ago. It's also says Western Germany
 

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Red-Coat

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Indeed. A span of interesting times that was. I recall being in grammar school and hearing quite a bit of talk about this Iron Curtain. As I got older I better understood what that was, but as a youngster it made no sense to me to make a curtain out of iron
??? The fuererhand name is still around, but they only produce one size of lantern today and it's called the 275 Baby and I found this one about 3 years ago. It's also says Western Germany

The term goes back a long way, and originally referenced the fire safety curtain used by theatres and often made from sheet iron. London’s (third) Theatre Royal in Drury Lane was the first to use such a curtain, fitted in 1794.

Ironically, the first documented use of the term as a metaphor in relation to Soviet Russia came from the Russian philosopher Vasily Rozanov in 1918 in the aftermath of the Russian revolution. The Nazis revived the metaphor before WWII had ended, including by Joseph Goebbels who said that if Germany lost the war “an iron curtain would fall over this enormous territory controlled by the Soviet Union, behind which nations would be slaughtered”; and Winston Churchill jumped on the bandwagon with a telegram to Harry S. Truman in 1945 expressing concern about the Russians in which he said: “an iron curtain is drawn down upon their front. We do not know what is going on behind”.

Generally, the “Cold War” is regarded as having started with the Truman Doctrine of 12 March 1947, setting out America’s foreign policy in relation to the Soviets, before Germany was formally partitioned to create East and West Germany on 23 May 1949.
 
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tamrock

tamrock

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The term goes back a long way, and originally referenced the fire safety curtain used by theatres and often made from sheet iron. London’s (third) Theatre Royal in Drury Lane was the first to use such a curtain, fitted in 1794.

Ironically, the first documented use of the term as a metaphor in relation to Soviet Russia came from the Russian philosopher Vasily Rozanov in 1918 in the aftermath of the Russian revolution. The Nazis revived the metaphor before WWII had ended, including by Joseph Goebbels who said that if Germany lost the war “an iron curtain would fall over this enormous territory controlled by the Soviet Union, behind which nations would be slaughtered”; and Winston Churchill jumped on the bandwagon with a telegram to Harry S. Truman in 1945 expressing concern about the Russians in which he said: “an iron curtain is drawn down upon their front. We do not know what is going on behind”.

Generally, the “Cold War” is regarded as having started with the Truman Doctrine of 12 March 1947, setting out America’s foreign policy in relation to the Soviets, before Germany was formally partitioned to create East and West Germany on 23 May 1949.
Interesting RC. I just remember that term (Iron Curtain) seemed to be mentioned somewhat frequently when I was Younger. On another note on Harry Trumam. I was reading through many letters my dad sent to my mom during his time in Korea. In this letter dated Jan 18, 1951 it seemed some of the fellow soldiers he served with were not all that fond of President Harry S Truman. My dad is the fella in the front row to the right.
 

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Chilli

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Love those old lamps.
I found mine in an old mine tunnel. I saw it hanging on the wall about 30 feet in. I dont go into those usually but as it was visible and not far in I got it, was hanging next to the shaft going down.
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tamrock

tamrock

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That's a little treasure there Chilli. Those early feuerhand lanterns can be highly prized by collectors. I love that rusty rustic look on yours.
 

Chilli

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That's a little treasure there Chilli. Those early feuerhand lanterns can be highly prized by collectors. I love that rusty rustic look on yours.
They are nice aren't they. Iv only ever found bits of old lanterns when out on the goldfields. I have a bit of a phobia with going into old mine tunnels and shafts and was going to walk away from it. I can assure you it was a tip toe retrieval 😆
 
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tamrock

tamrock

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They are nice aren't they. Iv only ever found bits of old lanterns when out on the goldfields. I have a bit of a phobia with going into old mine tunnels and shafts and was going to walk away from it. I can assure you it was a tip toe retrieval 😆
I've got over 40+ years in primarily underground mining and have been in so many different mines now I can't count over the years. Most I've been at ease in, but some not so much. Going into old abandoned mines is not a good idea and for years I've been updating my msha annual refresher and have heard from the instructors a few stories of bad endings of the curious adventure seeker getting into trouble or simply ending up dead. Going 30 feet in an old addit wouldn't be so much a risk as long as you keep your eyes and ears focused on your surroundings. If you do encounter bad air conditions, it'll be lights outs before you know it.
 

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