Gold in your backyard

High Etiquette 009

Jr. Member
Nov 20, 2015
36
68
NC
Detector(s) used
Fisher Gold Bug Pro, Bounty Hunter DISC 3300, Tracker IV, Garrett Pro-Pointer AT, Ace 250
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Howdy!


I've been working on a mining project since my discovery in summer of 2022. It was somewhat a matter of luck, and the fact that I live in a former gold producing district. As I was detecting in my backyard and found a target that was worth digging. I tried to dig with a shovel, then decided to get my pick' from my shed. As I broke into the ground in late August I ended up with a old beer can and around it a bunch of what looked like nuggets. Really tempting to just burry back in the ground.....

So from here on I've been on a mission to approach gold mining in a different fashion. I collected up all I could from this hole and placed them into Ball Jars. Eventually I moved onto a different patch in my backyard which by myself I managed to recover probably about 1 or 2 tons from. I have a lot less now due to space. This was summer of 2023, so the photos you seeing are what one-year of dry washing will do to "gold".

Hope you all found this interesting. Don't hesitate to ask if you need help with something or are curious about my techniques as there are more that go into the recovery it then just digging.

Happy Hunting & Stay Safe!
 

Attachments

  • P_20240615_205031.jpg
    P_20240615_205031.jpg
    796.9 KB · Views: 133
  • P_20240615_205039.jpg
    P_20240615_205039.jpg
    903.5 KB · Views: 130
  • P_20240615_205046.jpg
    P_20240615_205046.jpg
    725.2 KB · Views: 130
Upvote 2
You should be able to weight the rocks and get an idea per sq. inch in weight.

The metal detectors are sounding off over some mineral or minerals?
I missed the fact the OP referred to this as “gold” (not my quote).

“This was summer of 2023, so the photos you seeing are what one-year of dry washing will do to "gold".”

What miner would post up pictures of dirty/muddy rocks and refer to them as “gold”.

Prospector prospecting for locatable minerals. Law
 

I missed the fact the OP referred to this as “gold” (not my quote).

“This was summer of 2023, so the photos you seeing are what one-year of dry washing will do to "gold".”

What miner would post up pictures of dirty/muddy rocks and refer to them as “gold”.

Prospector prospecting for locatable minerals. Law
In my opinion, Probably not a miner.
Most likely not gold.
And.... This is a "dry washer"
140S.jpeg
 

In my opinion, Probably not a miner.
Most likely not gold.
And.... This is a "dry washer"
View attachment 2154822
Folks have questioned this poster about their methods, which they originally welcomed, yet they are MIA with explanations or helpful contributions.

I suggest we look closely at the introduction thread when folks first appear. We have long had a poster here that switches from actual conversation to BOT, then back to actual conversation. I find it extremely disrespectful, yet the monitors tolerate it because it’s impossible to prove with certainty. It’s a reality here.
Like that.
 

North Carolina has known deposits of xenotime is typically translucent to opaque (rarely transparent) in shades of brown to brownish yellow (most common) but also reddish to greenish brown and gray

Lanthanum is a soft, malleable, ductile, silver-white metal. Lanthanum is naturally found in sediments.: it oxidizes rapidly in air and it reacts with water to form the hydroxide.

Magnetism
All lanthanides have at least one unpaired electron, which acts like a small bar magnet due to its own magnetic field. This is one of the main reasons lanthanides are so valuable.

Reactivity
Lanthanides are very reactive and react with water to release hydrogen. They also react with dilute acid to release hydrogen, quickly at room temperature.
Care to elaborate on how this is relevant to the original post?
 

You should be able to weight the rocks and get an idea per sq. inch in weight.

The metal detectors are sounding off over some mineral or minerals?

Couple things I'd like to mention here.

1) I appreciate all the responses and I am surely not an AI as people here know me.

2) Another fact that points me to the potential discovery of real gold is that when Au is dissolved in aqua regia it becomes a pale or cinnamon brown color much similar to the color of these when they come out of the ground/classifier (another positive indicator)

3) I've taken some close up photos of the nugget(s) near a Red Bull for size. Some on my scale & some on my desk to show a different view for you all still interested in this post. I study gold a good amount and can tell that most of these would need to double or triple in weight to become what you would expect for weight.

4) I appreciate all your replies and whatnot but I wish you could understand these are not really "rocks". A rock is something you find in a creek with no value imo. These are placer pit diggings that have been shaken in a classifier pan to form nuggets.
 

Attachments

  • P_20240619_054028.jpg
    P_20240619_054028.jpg
    503.1 KB · Views: 26
  • P_20240619_053739.jpg
    P_20240619_053739.jpg
    608.2 KB · Views: 25
  • P_20240619_053813.jpg
    P_20240619_053813.jpg
    609.4 KB · Views: 25
  • P_20240619_053843.jpg
    P_20240619_053843.jpg
    643.9 KB · Views: 25
Assuming that you aren't just trolling for giggles, here's some things to think about.

Another fact that points me to the potential discovery of real gold is that when Au is dissolved in aqua regia it becomes a pale or cinnamon brown color much similar to the color of these when they come out of the ground/classifier (another positive indicator)
Assuming your rocks weren't sitting in an acid bath, this is irrelevant. Lots of rocks come out of the ground with a brown color.

I study gold a good amount and can tell that most of these would need to double or triple in weight to become what you would expect for weight.
So you are saying they are too light to be gold. Do you think they will gain weight just sitting around? Only people do that, not rocks. If they are too light to be gold now, they will still be too light to be gold a thousand years from now. Rocks do not turn into gold.

I wish you could understand these are not really "rocks"
All the photos say "Yes they are."

A rock is something you find in a creek with no value imo. These are placer pit diggings
Rocks are found literally everywhere, not just creeks. You will find tons of them in placer pit diggings.

These are placer pit diggings that have been shaken in a classifier pan to form nuggets.
You can shake them all you want, they will still be plain old rocks.

To sum up, these rocks are not gold. They will not spontaneously "develop" or turn into gold. Nothing you do to them will make them become gold. Any time you spend "dry washing" or otherwise processing these rocks is wasted, unless you just like having a bunch of rocks that look like petrified chicken nuggets. They don't even rise to the level of portable rock art.

Surely you know this and are just trolling to waste people's time, right?
 

Kudo's to RobertK for a kind, respectful and very accurate, honest post.

I do hope the OP will give it serious consideration.
 

Assuming that you aren't just trolling for giggles, here's some things to think about.


Assuming your rocks weren't sitting in an acid bath, this is irrelevant. Lots of rocks come out of the ground with a brown color.


So you are saying they are too light to be gold. Do you think they will gain weight just sitting around? Only people do that, not rocks. If they are too light to be gold now, they will still be too light to be gold a thousand years from now. Rocks do not turn into gold.


All the photos say "Yes they are."


Rocks are found literally everywhere, not just creeks. You will find tons of them in placer pit diggings.


You can shake them all you want, they will still be plain old rocks.

To sum up, these rocks are not gold. They will not spontaneously "develop" or turn into gold. Nothing you do to them will make them become gold. Any time you spend "dry washing" or otherwise processing these rocks is wasted, unless you just like having a bunch of rocks that look like petrified chicken nuggets. They don't even rise to the level of portable rock art.

Surely you know this and are just trolling to waste people's time, right?
If the rocks identify as gold nuggets, please be respectful (as High is doing), and call them “gold” “nuggets”.

Folks have been convinced they can grow gold for thousands of years. Ever hear of Alchemy?

If the OP has spent 2 years mining placer tailings, he definitely knows what a rock is and where they can be found. .
:dontknow:
 

Couple things I'd like to mention here.

1) I appreciate all the responses and I am surely not an AI as people here know me.

2) Another fact that points me to the potential discovery of real gold is that when Au is dissolved in aqua regia it becomes a pale or cinnamon brown color much similar to the color of these when they come out of the ground/classifier (another positive indicator)

3) I've taken some close up photos of the nugget(s) near a Red Bull for size. Some on my scale & some on my desk to show a different view for you all still interested in this post. I study gold a good amount and can tell that most of these would need to double or triple in weight to become what you would expect for weight.

4) I appreciate all your replies and whatnot but I wish you could understand these are not really "rocks". A rock is something you find in a creek with no value imo. These are placer pit diggings that have been shaken in a classifier pan to form nuggets.


I will agree that gold powder (once dropped from suspension in aqua regia) is a cinnamon brown color. It’s important to understand that Aqua Regia doesn’t exist in nature. Gold that’s been dropped from suspension that isn’t pure, in other words still has copper or iron contamination is not a cinnamon brown color, it’s more poop brown or even black.

It’s also important to note that cinnamon brown colored gold powder or clumps of powder weigh just the same as the gold would. It is gold just finely divided particular of it.

I’m sure some of these comments come off as people poking fun at you but honestly I believe you have many of us at a loss. I have found the people on the page helpful and for the most part in good spirits.

It’s Very likely that you have collected simple stones. Those of us asking for verification would love to see at least one proven method of verification applied to these stones. Not only for our own curiosity’s but in all honesty to help you see that it’s nearly 100% certainty that your wasting what sounds like a great deal of your time and effort collecting stones that won’t yield the pay day that you and we prospectors are chasing.

If in fact this is gold and we all are just clueless than please perform a test that will prove us wrong. That way we can learn from your willingness to share your finds and we’ll all know what we are walking past.
 

Howdy!


I've been working on a mining project since my discovery in summer of 2022. It was somewhat a matter of luck, and the fact that I live in a former gold producing district. As I was detecting in my backyard and found a target that was worth digging. I tried to dig with a shovel, then decided to get my pick' from my shed. As I broke into the ground in late August I ended up with a old beer can and around it a bunch of what looked like nuggets. Really tempting to just burry back in the ground.....

So from here on I've been on a mission to approach gold mining in a different fashion. I collected up all I could from this hole and placed them into Ball Jars. Eventually I moved onto a different patch in my backyard which by myself I managed to recover probably about 1 or 2 tons from. I have a lot less now due to space. This was summer of 2023, so the photos you seeing are what one-year of dry washing will do to "gold".

Hope you all found this interesting. Don't hesitate to ask if you need help with something or are curious about my techniques as there are more that go into the recovery it then just digging.

Happy Hunting & Stay Safe!
After re reading your original post above, the following questions come to mind:

Just what are your "techniques" and what equipment, other than a shovel, do you use?
How did you locate the "different patch"?
What did the "one to two tons" that you "recover"(ed) consist of and what happened that caused you to "have a lot less now due to space"?

Much of what you have posted so far, does not make sense to me and apparently others who have responded to this thread. Your answers may help us
 

Last edited:
 

After re reading your original post above, the following questions come to mind:

Just what are your "techniques" and what equipment, other than a shovel, do you use?
How did you locate the "different patch"?
What did the "one to two tons" that you "recover"(ed) consist of and what happened that caused you to "have a lot less now due to space"?

Much of what you have posted so far, does not make sense to me and apparently others who have responded to this thread. Your answers may help us
I recall a certain short time handle entertaining us all with a lengthy thread about starting up a mine..can’t recall much other than that but their story was very detailed and involved stories about the nearby town. Finally they slipped up and it came out they were simply messing with folks. Got banned. I’d love to go back and read that thread but I think it was deleted.

Long story short sometimes folks pop into the mining forum and stir things up that really energizes the forum. This thread makes so little sense, I suspect…well it’s been said.
 

Well documented deposits in NC. and the OP photos.
You think his photos are indicative of Xenotime?

I’m not familiar with that mineral, but here is what Wikipedia comes up with. Without seeing photos of the actual rock surface, I’m confused how you made that correlation. I’m open to learning, just don’t see the connection. Similar to my confusion as to what the OP is saying they found.
IMG_3065.jpeg



Is that a poor example? I’d think if the OP was interested in ID’n the rocks they would scrub them with a toothbrush or ultrasonic cleaning. Then you could actually see the surface of the stone. Yes - No? Just using my common sense which apparently isn’t common.

Let’s run this thread up, which is obviously the goal.
 

Last edited:
Couple things I'd like to mention here.

1) I appreciate all the responses and I am surely not an AI as people here know me.

2) Another fact that points me to the potential discovery of real gold is that when Au is dissolved in aqua regia it becomes a pale or cinnamon brown color much similar to the color of these when they come out of the ground/classifier (another positive indicator)

3) I've taken some close up photos of the nugget(s) near a Red Bull for size. Some on my scale & some on my desk to show a different view for you all still interested in this post. I study gold a good amount and can tell that most of these would need to double or triple in weight to become what you would expect for weight.

4) I appreciate all your replies and whatnot but I wish you could understand these are not really "rocks". A rock is something you find in a creek with no value imo. These are placer pit diggings that have been shaken in a classifier pan to form nuggets.
Have you check these rocks for possible lanthanides content that you point out there is 4 -15 percent content that looks like silver?

Xenotime is known to be in deposits in NC have you checked with a Community College or rock club to see if your rocks are part of this deposit?

What mineral or minerals is causing the fair to strong signal or sound off you point out?
 

Last edited:
Have you check these rocks for possible lanthanides content that you point out there is 4 -15 percent content that looks like silver?

Xenotime is known to be in deposits in NC have you checked with a Community College or rock club to see if your rocks are part of this deposit?

What mineral or minerals is causing the fair to strong signal or sound off you point out?
I wonder if they have visually verified if there is rhondolite in that deposit? I’m not sure it’s found in many other states.

While rhodolite itself is not directly associated with gold deposits, the geological conditions that favor the formation of garnets can also be conducive to the presence of other valuable minerals, including gold. North Carolina has a history of gold mining, particularly in the central Piedmont region. The types of metamorphic and igneous rock formations that can host garnet deposits can also be favorable environments for gold-bearing quartz veins and other mineralization processes associated with gold.

The specific gravity of the material which was very free from
inclusions was 3.838. Chemical composition:
SiO2 A1203 Fe203 FeO MgO CaO Sum
41.59 23.I3 I.90 15.55 I7.23 0.92 00.32
corresponding to the formula 2Mg3 Al2 (SiO4)3.Fe3Al2 (SiO4)3, a mix-
ture of two pyrope molecules with one of almandine.
 

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Back
Top