How many of these are Megaladon Teeth?

Alexander997

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Okay, so my dad’s friend works in Louisiana and knows I love history. He works for a company that builds solar panels and gets to play in the dirt, where he finds a lot of fossils and arrowheads. Occasionally, he’ll bring me a bag of teeth he’s found. My question is, how many of the above are megaladon teeth? How many are other types of sharks? I know very bottom left (biggest tooth pictured) is most definitely a megaladon tooth and I know the tiny black one is from a sand tiger shark.. But, what are the rest?

Thanks in advance!
 
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pepperj

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Great gift you got.
Your Dad is lucky to be able to play a little in the dirt.
The lower left certainly does look like one.
Kind of need a size reference.
This one looks big but a dime would just about cover it.
20211219_171200.jpg
 
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A

Alexander997

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Wonder if the native tribes ever used shark teeth for arrow head points. Seems logical, seems it would be way less work than knapping an arrow head. Nice score!
I remember reading one time that the natives did use megaladon teeth! Makes sense and like you said, saves time compared to knapping a stone!
 

Digger RJ

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View attachment 2051537

Okay, so my dad’s friend works in Louisiana and knows I love history. He works for a company that builds solar panels and gets to play in the dirt, where he finds a lot of fossils and arrowheads. Occasionally, he’ll bring me a bag of teeth he’s found. My question is, how many of the above are megaladon teeth? How many are other types of sharks? I know very bottom left (biggest tooth pictured) is most definitely a megaladon tooth and I know the tiny black one is from a sand tiger shark.. But, what are the rest?

Thanks in advance!
Very Cool!!! Congrats!!!
 

Sandog

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View attachment 2051537

Okay, so my dad’s friend works in Louisiana and knows I love history. He works for a company that builds solar panels and gets to play in the dirt, where he finds a lot of fossils and arrowheads. Occasionally, he’ll bring me a bag of teeth he’s found. My question is, how many of the above are megaladon teeth? How many are other types of sharks? I know very bottom left (biggest tooth pictured) is most definitely a megaladon tooth and I know the tiny black one is from a sand tiger shark.. But, what are the rest?

Thanks in advance!
Nice collection. Based on research I did on mine (see attached photo), and some others I've seen pics of, it's pretty safe to say "absolutely" to the bottom left. But you'd want some more expert opinion on that. The ID has a lot to do with the root shape and transition to tooth. Serrations on the tooth may play into that ID also. 20220815_094145[1].jpg 2022-08-15_09.44.32[1].jpg
 

Kray Gelder

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View attachment 2051537

Okay, so my dad’s friend works in Louisiana and knows I love history. He works for a company that builds solar panels and gets to play in the dirt, where he finds a lot of fossils and arrowheads. Occasionally, he’ll bring me a bag of teeth he’s found. My question is, how many of the above are megaladon teeth? How many are other types of sharks? I know very bottom left (biggest tooth pictured) is most definitely a megaladon tooth and I know the tiny black one is from a sand tiger shark.. But, what are the rest?

Thanks in advance!
Top row, left to right...Meg, meg, angustiden, great white, great white. 2nd row... meg, tiger shark, meg, great white. Bottom...meg, meg, meg, great white. Cool finds.
 

Kray Gelder

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You’re THE best!!

Thank you so much!! This helps so much!
The angustiden, fyi, lived about 33 to 22 mil years ago, and reached a length of up to 31 feet long. The meg, followed the angustiden, and lived from 23 to 2.5 mil years ago, much of that in direct competition with the great white. Megs reached 59 feet long, averaging 34 feet. This info comes from "Planet Shark Divers."
 

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