I found this near Antioch Ca.

Sep 25, 2021
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It is my understanding "normal" quartz crystals aren't highly found in this area. To be honest it looks sort of like mica. It has that almost sheer metallic sorta "flakey" look to it but it also has a crystal type hardness to it . 🤷*♀️ I don't know. I am not familiar with California minerals/rocks
 

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ANTIQUARIAN

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Welcome to Tnet from Toronto SHL. :hello:
That's an interesting piece of quartz, of course I'm generalizing, mainly because I have no idea what type of stone that is. :laughing7:

You may want to re-post your question here as well... Rocks/Gems
Dave
 
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blauer

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It is my understanding "normal" quartz crystals aren't highly found in this area. To be honest it looks sort of like mica. It has that almost sheer metallic sorta "flakey" look to it but it also has a crystal type hardness to it . ��*♀️ I don't know. I am not familiar with California minerals/rocks

Quartz (crystals) is found just about everywhere.

Perform a rudimentary scratch test for hardness and a streak test on any piece of unglazed porcelain.

If you scroll down from the forum main page you'll notice the Rock/Gem forum which is a better place to post questions like yours's.
 
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SorenCoins

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A Mohs hardness test should help with the ID, since calcite and quartz are very similar-looking minerals with very different hardness levels.
 
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SorenCoins

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It might be gypsum.
That's a great point. It does look like gypsum var. selenite.
For when you do the Mohs hardness test:
  • Gypsum has a hardness of 2
  • Calcite has a hardness of 3
  • Quartz has a hardness of 7
As another test, calcite and gypsum should react with vinegar while quartz will not. To test this, try putting a drop of white vinegar on the specimen. Watch to see if you can spot any bubbles forming as the mineral reacts with the vinegar. The fancy word for this property is "effervescence." It's best to just put a drop of vinegar on the specimen rather than dropping it into vinegar because you presumably do not want to destroy the specimen (although, to be fair, I am not sure if standard household white vinegar could fully dissolve a specimen or not).
 
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BrassEagle

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Look up Black mountain diamond mine and Quarry between Antioch and Concord I believe its was a diamond mine? coal, and sandstone. It has been a long time sense I was in that area in the 60's as a kid. Good luck and happy hunting Bill
 
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