I need help with identifying these rocks

Biosattva

Greenie
Sep 10, 2021
14
18
Turkey
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Few days ago I posted a question about some different looking rocks (http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/rocks-gems/661096-i-need-help-identifying-these-rocks.html), when you click on the link you'll see a yellow rock (I think it is yellow jasper).
And here is another rock I need to identify.
IMG_20210927_222721.jpg
IMG_20210927_222922.jpg
First I thought that they were yellow jaspers too, but I'm not sure about it. I need your help.
The rocks on the photo are really hard, they have some sharp edges and they spark when hit by steel.
 

Julieb

Jr. Member
Oct 3, 2021
33
32
Ohio fairfield county
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Few days ago I posted a question about some different looking rocks (http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/rocks-gems/661096-i-need-help-identifying-these-rocks.html), when you click on the link you'll see a yellow rock (I think it is yellow jasper).
And here is another rock I need to identify.
View attachment 1949195
View attachment 1949196
First I thought that they were yellow jaspers too, but I'm not sure about it. I need your help.
The rocks on the photo are really hard, they have some sharp edges and they spark when hit by steel.
Looks like flint which would explain the spark. I live in Ohio our state gem is flint blah lol Indians used to make all kinds of tools. Looks kinda like chert too but both belong to the quartz family. I joined this site for the same reason but no not much help so far. Sorry i wish i could have said its gold lol
 
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Biosattva

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Sep 10, 2021
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Looks like flint which would explain the spark. I live in Ohio our state gem is flint blah lol Indians used to make all kinds of tools. Looks kinda like chert too but both belong to the quartz family. I joined this site for the same reason but no not much help so far. Sorry i wish i could have said its gold lol
I don't think that those are flint, they are kind of transculent so I think they could be agate, but I am not sure.
 
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Julieb

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Oct 3, 2021
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Ohio fairfield county
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I don't think that those are flint, they are kind of transculent so I think they could be agate, but I am not sure.
I've never seen agate like that and agate would never produce a spark lol i def could be wrong too but this is yellow agate. I have some that is caramel colored in the middle of a stone.
 

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Biosattva

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Sep 10, 2021
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I've never seen agate like that and agate would never produce a spark lol i def could be wrong too but this is yellow agate. I have some that is caramel colored in the middle of a stone.
Maybe it's not agate but agate, quartz, chert, jasper, obsidian and flint all of them produce sparks, you can test it with a piece of high carbon steel.
 
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Julieb

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Oct 3, 2021
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Ohio fairfield county
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Maybe it's not agate but agate, quartz, chert, jasper, obsidian and flint all of them produce sparks, you can test it with a piece of high carbon steel.
That is how we generally test to know if its in the flint family. I know quartz is in most of what you mentored but I've never had a spark from Agate or quartz itself. Still learning been yrs and still learning lol still have many rocks i can't identify i believe they are in the quartz family but not exactly what they are. Now that you mention obsidian it kind of looks like it could be golden obsidian too. Location would be helpful
 
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Biosattva

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That is how we generally test to know if its in the flint family. I know quartz is in most of what you mentored but I've never had a spark from Agate or quartz itself. Still learning been yrs and still learning lol still have many rocks i can't identify i believe they are in the quartz family but not exactly what they are. Now that you mention obsidian it kind of looks like it could be golden obsidian too. Location would be helpful
They are from Black Sea Coast, Turkey. If you want the rocks to spark you have to hit a sharp edge, if you dont have a edge you have to brake it first. I think they're not obsidian.
 
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Clay Diggins

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Agate, chalcedony, chert, jasper, and flint are all just different names for microcrystalline quartz rock. Flint is just another name for agate, chert, chalcedony, jasper etc. Other than the names there is no effective difference.

Microcrystalline quartz rock will produce a spark when struck by iron metal. How well it does that has more to do with the iron used, how well consolidated the rock is and the electrical potential of the moment than it does with what name you like to call the microcrystalline quartz rock.
 
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Julieb

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Oct 3, 2021
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Ohio fairfield county
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Agate, chalcedony, chert, jasper, and flint are all just different names for microcrystalline quartz rock. Flint is just another name for agate, chert, chalcedony, jasper etc. Other than the names there is no effective difference.

Microcrystalline quartz rock will produce a spark when struck by iron metal. How well it does that has more to do with the iron used, how well consolidated the rock is and the electrical potential of the moment than it does with what name you like to call the microcrystalline quartz rock.
Then why not just call it all one thing would make it a helluva lot easier lol we've always used steel to spark the rocks but to each his own 😊
 
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Clay Diggins

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Then why not just call it all one thing would make it a helluva lot easier lol we've always used steel to spark the rocks but to each his own 😊
Professional mineralogists do refer to the whole group as chalcedony. There is no distinction but color.

On the other hand professional sellers often come up with different names for the same substance. In the commercial world it's all about the appeal.

There are many instances of commercial names becoming more well known than the proper name. For instance the mineral corundum is variously referred to as sapphire, ruby and alexandrite. The mineral Beryl is variously referred to as aquamarine, emerald, goshenite and helidor. All those names are based on color alone, the mineral is the same.

Iron sparks fine. Wrought iron is best but any iron or steel with a high carbon or manganese content will spark better than cast iron, stainless steel or mild steel. They all spark on chalcedony no matter what name you choose to call it.
 
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Moesia

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Then why not just call it all one thing would make it a helluva lot easier lol we've always used steel to spark the rocks but to each his own 😊
Different names reflect different environments of formation of microcrystalline quartz. That is why different names are used, to reflect that.
 
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