Identification help please. Found on the beach after a storm. Not magnetic.

mdoc7777

Tenderfoot
Jun 17, 2014
7
16
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
05D4003E-1EE1-4B25-9FEA-D25C8055DA3A_1_201_a.jpeg
 

Attachments

  • tempImageIWaZfk.jpg
    tempImageIWaZfk.jpg
    1.6 MB · Views: 151

vpnavy

Super Moderator
Staff member
Jun 15, 2008
34,143
17,861
York County, PA (USA)
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
tn_moved_over.gif
I moved ya from HELP! over to WHAT IS IT? for more exposure.

tn_notice.gif
NOTE: Forum HELP! Description: This section contains guides tutorials on how to use the new TreasureNet.com software.
 
Upvote 1

pepperj

Gold Member
Feb 3, 2009
28,721
95,794
Detector(s) used
Deus, Deus 2, Minelab 3030, E-Trac,
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much.
The second picture is out of focus a tad.
Also put a coin beside it to get a sense on size if you could.
Salt or fresh water
General area so folks get a sense where you are located.
(don't want to know the beach)
 
Upvote 0
OP
M

mdoc7777

Tenderfoot
Jun 17, 2014
7
16
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #5
The second picture is out of focus a tad.
Also put a coin beside it to get a sense on size if you could.
Salt or fresh water
General area so folks get a sense where you are located.
(don't want to know the beach)
It was found in salt water in the Gulf of Mexico, Pan handle, after a storm. Its a little bit larger than a quarter. I'll post a pic of it next to a coin shortly. Thank you for responding.
 
Upvote 2
OP
M

mdoc7777

Tenderfoot
Jun 17, 2014
7
16
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #6
The second picture is out of focus a tad.
Also put a coin beside it to get a sense on size if you could.
Salt or fresh water
General area so folks get a sense where you are located.
(don't want to know the beach)
It appears to have some sort of writing or stamping on it. Very difficult to see from the pictures though. Highly oxidized on one side and only oxidized on the perimeter of the object on the other side. Could this have been attached to something and broke off in a storm being that only one side is highly oxidized?
 

Attachments

  • EFEA9F82-D6F4-4413-AB0F-96D2AE18D1D9_1_201_a.jpeg
    EFEA9F82-D6F4-4413-AB0F-96D2AE18D1D9_1_201_a.jpeg
    95.9 KB · Views: 47
Upvote 1

cudamark

Gold Member
Mar 16, 2011
12,320
12,200
San Diego
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
XP Deus 2, Equinox 800, Fisher Impulse AQ, E-Trac, 3 Excal 1000's, White's TM808, VibraProbe, 15" NEL Attack, 5X10 Joey, Steath 920ix and 720i, TRX, etc....
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I'd gently tap on it to break that crust a bit. If it starts to look interesting, maybe a soak in Evaporust.
 
Upvote 2

UnderMiner

Silver Member
Jul 27, 2014
3,472
8,082
New York City
🥇 Banner finds
2
Detector(s) used
Minelab Excalibur II, Ace 250
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
It's probably a Spanish 1 or 2 Reale cob coin lost by the Spanish Plate Fleet. Those guys spilled countless tens of thousands of those coins over the centuries in the Gulf of Mexico. Part of my assumption is based on the the amount of iron oxide surrounding it which takes a long time to accumulate and would make more sense on an older coin such as a Spanish cob.

The fact that the coin's metal is still shiny is evidence it's likely silver, anything else wouldn't be shiny after all that iron oxide build up around it.

It also seems to have the look of a cross surounded by a border reminiscent of the sheild-type cobs produced in the Spanish Empire's mints, which were the most common silver coins in the new world at the time.

You should really just break the iron oxide off and expose more detail. A spanish cob isn't too valuable in such a corroded state so you shouldn't fear damaging it, the oxide should come off fairly easily with a few light taps of a rubber mallet with the coin wrapped in a few layers of paper towels.
 
Upvote 3
OP
M

mdoc7777

Tenderfoot
Jun 17, 2014
7
16
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #17
It's probably a Spanish 1 or 2 Reale cob coin lost by the Spanish Plate Fleet. Those guys spilled countless tens of thousands of those coins over the centuries in the Gulf of Mexico. Part of my assumption is based on the the amount of iron oxide surrounding it which takes a long time to accumulate and would make more sense on an older coin such as a Spanish cob.

The fact that the coin's metal is still shiny is evidence it's likely silver, anything else wouldn't be shiny after all that iron oxide build up around it.

It also seems to have the look of a cross surounded by a border reminiscent of the sheild-type cobs produced in the Spanish Empire's mints, which were the most common silver coins in the new world at the time.

You should really just break the iron oxide off and expose more detail. A spanish cob isn't too valuable in such a corroded state so you shouldn't fear damaging it, the oxide should come off fairly easily with a few light taps of a rubber mallet with the coin wrapped in a few layers of paper towels.
 
Upvote 1

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top