🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Is this a treasure site ? Is this tomb real ?

9AKA2

Greenie
Oct 12, 2021
12
16
0A98461C-E59B-4E34-8D16-DEF0B5620161.jpeg
 

GoldieLocks

Bronze Member
Dec 28, 2019
1,075
1,119
Nevada
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Yes, and you can possibly look up the name and maybe some bodies names contained within by joining and using findagrave.com Free. It has been a very useful site for me because I am very into genealogy.
 
Upvote 2

Red-Coat

Silver Member
Dec 23, 2019
3,787
11,976
Surrey, UK
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Why would you think it's not a "real tomb"? Whether or not any treasure has been buried within it (and the morality or legality of disturbing it) depends very much on where it is, how old it might be and whether burial with 'grave goods' was custom and practice for the culture it relates to. Folks seem to be assuming it's in America. Surely not, unless it relates to an immigrant culture. Looks more like something you would find in Turkey or the Middle-East, with Arabic-type inscriptions.

Where exactly is it?
 
Upvote 12

crashbandicoot

Gold Member
Sep 27, 2020
12,127
27,040
Dumas,AR
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Why would you think it's not a "real tomb"? Whether or not any treasure has been buried within it (and the morality or legality of disturbing it) depends very much on where it is, how old it might be and whether burial with 'grave goods' was custom and practice for the culture it relates to. Folks seem to be assuming it's in America. Surely not, unless it relates to an immigrant culture. Looks more like something you would find in Turkey or the Middle-East, with Arabic-type inscriptions.

Where exactly is it?
I did make that assumption.bad cess to me!:laughing7:
 
Upvote 1

Charlie P. (NY)

Gold Member
Feb 3, 2006
12,925
16,927
South Central Upstate NY in the foothills of the h
Detector(s) used
Minelab Musketeer Advantage Pro w/8" & 10" DD coils/Fisher F75se(Upgraded to LTD2) w/11" DD, 6.5" concentric & 9.5" NEL Sharpshooter DD coils/Sunray FX-1 Probe & F-Point/Black Widows/Rattler headphone
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
old-muslim-cemetery-in-turkey-graveyard-with-ruined-tombstones-at-islamic-cemetery-stock-image_csp90091268.jpg


Appears to be a Muslim grave. Likely real (hard to judge dimensions from the image you posted).

Muslims are a sensible folk and don't, as I understand it, generally believe you can "take it with you". I would doubt there is treasure of the monetary kind buried there.
 
Upvote 2

Red-Coat

Silver Member
Dec 23, 2019
3,787
11,976
Surrey, UK
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I would say old grave. We see them here near very old home sites.

I would also agree with Tony in SC

I agree that it looks like a early to mid nineteenth century stone walled gravesite.

I just checked 9AKA2's posting history. He was previously asking about carved symbols on a gravestone for which he again didn't give a location. It turned out to be in the village of Berashe in the Kurdistan region of Northern Iraq.

Until he gives us more information and close-ups of the inscriptions I'm keeping my powder dry.... but I think this will prove to have considerable age, and be located in an Arabic-speaking country, to the extent that resources like 'findagrave' and comparisons to 'old home sites' in America won't be of any help.

Over to you 9AKA2... please tell us more.
 
Last edited:
Upvote 7
OP
9AKA2

9AKA2

Greenie
Oct 12, 2021
12
16
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #12
I just checked 9AKA2's posting history. He was previously asking about carved symbols on a gravestone for which he again didn't give a location. It turned out to be in the village of Berashe in the Kurdistan region of Northern Iraq.

Until he gives us more information and close-ups of the inscriptions I'm keeping my powder dry.... but I think this will prove to have considerable age, and be located in an Arabic-speaking country, to the extent that resources like 'findagrave' and comparisons to 'old home sites' in America won't be of any help.

Over to you 9AKA2... please tell us more.
Sorry i just saw your messages, here are more pictures of the grave, and as you said its a village in the Kurdistan region in northern Iraq, the Cemetery is far from the old village located at a top of a hill, and this grave is amongst many other graves, and this grave is one of the oldest ones in this cemetery, i heard from some people in this village that this grave is (maybe) not a real grave but it contains some sort of treasure, and of course i cant destroy the grave its just morally wrong, so what do you guys thing ?is it possible that this is a treasure site ? Thanks.
 

Attachments

  • 1BC879A2-2CDD-4124-9802-8B8F6104D182.jpeg
    1BC879A2-2CDD-4124-9802-8B8F6104D182.jpeg
    307.7 KB · Views: 22
  • E038F9F9-2FD5-44AD-8C41-450BFBF46306.jpeg
    E038F9F9-2FD5-44AD-8C41-450BFBF46306.jpeg
    347.7 KB · Views: 26
Upvote 2

Red-Coat

Silver Member
Dec 23, 2019
3,787
11,976
Surrey, UK
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Thanks. I suspected it would be something of the sort. From a moral standpoint, it's your choice what you are comfortable with, but from a legal standpoint I think it would be wise to confine yourself to researching the history of the cemetery and the graves within and forget any notion of digging for treasure. Iraq has very strict laws concerning antiquities and cultural materials.

A retired British geologist named Jim Fritton and a German tourist were recently arrested at Baghdad airport and have been detained in Iraq since the end of March. They had both been on an organised archaeological tour of the country and have been charged with trafficking antiquities. Mr Fritton had a dozen small sherds of pottery and stone material in his luggage, described by his family as "no bigger than a fingernail and of no archaeological significance or value". Although he was trying to take the items out of the country, it’s also an offence to have removed them from the site where he found them… despite the tour guide having told him it was OK to take them

The British press have hyped up the story with a suggestion that he might face the death penalty but, although that’s pretty unlikely, he could still get a significant prison sentence when his case comes to court.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...ion-in-iraq-say-foreign-office-is-not-helping

https://www.artnews.com/art-news/ne...facts-in-iraq-faces-death-penalty-1234627261/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-61541375

This is paraphrased from the ‘Iraq Heritage’ website:

All ‘Antiquities’ (defined as "movable and immovable property which has been built, made, carved, produced, written or painted by man, those age of which is not less than 200 years, as well as human and animal skeletons and plant remains") plus all ‘Heritage Material’ (defined as "movable and immovable property, less than 200 years of age, possessing a historical, national, religious and artistic value") are protected by:

Iraq Law Number 55 and preceding legislation [Antiquities Law No. 59, enacted in 1936, as amended by amendments 120 (1974) and Amendment 164 (1975)]

Such materials are considered the property of the State. Discovering, taking, purchasing or receiving as a gift any antiquity or heritage material that originated in Iraq, without promptly notifying and registering the object with the State Board of Antiquities and Heritage, is a violation of the above law. No one is allowed to excavate, dig for, discover or take any antiquity or heritage material without a written permit from the Iraq State Board of Antiquities and Heritage. Likewise, no one is allowed to remove or transport any antiquity or heritage material from the territory of Iraq without a permit from the same body.

The penalties for violation may include incarceration of up to 10 years in prison and a fine of 100,000 Iraqi Dinars. Illegal excavation (looting) may result in imprisonment for a period of up to 15 years and a fine of two times the value of the damages sustained. Trafficking in antiquities is punishable with a term of imprisonment for a period not to exceed 10 years and a fine of up to 1,000,000 Iraqi Dinars.

U.S. service personnel or contactors are subject to Law Number 55 while on Iraqi soil and the law may also be invoked by a federal prosecutor in the United States in support of a charge under the National Stolen Property Act in the event that antiquities or heritage material of Iraqi origin are transported to the U.S.
 
Upvote 5
OP
9AKA2

9AKA2

Greenie
Oct 12, 2021
12
16
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #14
Thanks. I suspected it would be something of the sort. From a moral standpoint, it's your choice what you are comfortable with, but from a legal standpoint I think it would be wise to confine yourself to researching the history of the cemetery and the graves within and forget any notion of digging for treasure. Iraq has very strict laws concerning antiquities and cultural materials.

A retired British geologist named Jim Fritton and a German tourist were recently arrested at Baghdad airport and have been detained in Iraq since the end of March. They had both been on an organised archaeological tour of the country and have been charged with trafficking antiquities. Mr Fritton had a dozen small sherds of pottery and stone material in his luggage, described by his family as "no bigger than a fingernail and of no archaeological significance or value". Although he was trying to take the items out of the country, it’s also an offence to have removed them from the site where he found them… despite the tour guide having told him it was OK to take them

The British press have hyped up the story with a suggestion that he might face the death penalty but, although that’s pretty unlikely, he could still get a significant prison sentence when his case comes to court.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...ion-in-iraq-say-foreign-office-is-not-helping

https://www.artnews.com/art-news/ne...facts-in-iraq-faces-death-penalty-1234627261/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-somerset-61541375

This is paraphrased from the ‘Iraq Heritage’ website:

All ‘Antiquities’ (defined as "movable and immovable property which has been built, made, carved, produced, written or painted by man, those age of which is not less than 200 years, as well as human and animal skeletons and plant remains") plus all ‘Heritage Material’ (defined as "movable and immovable property, less than 200 years of age, possessing a historical, national, religious and artistic value") are protected by:

Iraq Law Number 55 and preceding legislation [Antiquities Law No. 59, enacted in 1936, as amended by amendments 120 (1974) and Amendment 164 (1975)]

Such materials are considered the property of the State. Discovering, taking, purchasing or receiving as a gift any antiquity or heritage material that originated in Iraq, without promptly notifying and registering the object with the State Board of Antiquities and Heritage, is a violation of the above law. No one is allowed to excavate, dig for, discover or take any antiquity or heritage material without a written permit from the Iraq State Board of Antiquities and Heritage. Likewise, no one is allowed to remove or transport any antiquity or heritage material from the territory of Iraq without a permit from the same body.

The penalties for violation may include incarceration of up to 10 years in prison and a fine of 100,000 Iraqi Dinars. Illegal excavation (looting) may result in imprisonment for a period of up to 15 years and a fine of two times the value of the damages sustained. Trafficking in antiquities is punishable with a term of imprisonment for a period not to exceed 10 years and a fine of up to 1,000,000 Iraqi Dinars.

U.S. service personnel or contactors are subject to Law Number 55 while on Iraqi soil and the law may also be invoked by a federal prosecutor in the United States in support of a charge under the National Stolen Property Act in the event that antiquities or heritage material of Iraqi origin are transported to the U.S.
Thanks for your concern and all the help that you gave me, i will surely not dig the grave and look more into the history of the village and the cemetery.
 
Upvote 4

Gare

Gold Member
Dec 30, 2012
5,179
9,953
Canton Ohio Area
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
2
Detector(s) used
Presently using Deus's have Minelabs, Nokta's Tesoro's Have them all . Have WAY to many need to get rid of some
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Another possibility is the Grave stone markers could have been found laying just about the place and someone stacked them there so they could clean the place up[
 
Upvote 2

Gare

Gold Member
Dec 30, 2012
5,179
9,953
Canton Ohio Area
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
2
Detector(s) used
Presently using Deus's have Minelabs, Nokta's Tesoro's Have them all . Have WAY to many need to get rid of some
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Some times i find the burial service in the area and also check the local news papers for deceased info and relations
 
Upvote 1

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top