✅ SOLVED Is this missouri obsidian?

lostandrare

Jr. Member
Sep 13, 2015
36
33
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I put this in a post on hard rock mining and it didn't get alot of love. I found this digging in a fossil bed in jackson county missouri. This was away from water near the top of a hill down an access originally cut for utilities. It has that shine and a smooth texture. I was thinking obsidian at first but that is so rare here. Anyone have an idea?
 

Attachments

  • 20220703_204121.jpg
    20220703_204121.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 85
  • 20220703_204107.jpg
    20220703_204107.jpg
    1.4 MB · Views: 37
  • 20220703_204038.jpg
    20220703_204038.jpg
    1.2 MB · Views: 39
  • 20220703_204031.jpg
    20220703_204031.jpg
    1.3 MB · Views: 39

unclemac

Gold Member
Oct 12, 2011
6,205
5,370
Primary Interest:
Beach & Shallow Water Hunting
is it at all translucent? Overall it looks like a black siliceous stone of which there are many. Think of it as "black jasper."
 
Upvote 2
OP
L

lostandrare

Jr. Member
Sep 13, 2015
36
33
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #5
Got to agree with smoke it looks like slag glass from a railroad or other industrial waste
I will have to Google some examples. just don't know how Slag glass get embedded under with bracheopod and bivalve fossils? The brownish material mixed in with the black is what had the fossils in it that made me want to poke around. When I break open rocks of that brownish type the interior is grey with small crystals (calcite?)
 

Attachments

  • 20220706_031813.jpg
    20220706_031813.jpg
    1.9 MB · Views: 16
  • 20220706_031345.jpg
    20220706_031345.jpg
    2.4 MB · Views: 17
  • 20220706_032158.jpg
    20220706_032158.jpg
    1.9 MB · Views: 18
Upvote 0
OP
L

lostandrare

Jr. Member
Sep 13, 2015
36
33
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #6
is it at all translucent? Overall it looks like a black siliceous stone of which there are many. Think of it as "black jasper"
I will put it under a bright light later and let you know. I did a quick Google of siliceous stone. It would be in keeping with the underwater creature fossils but that is also associated with volcanic activity in the article I read. I am inclined that way though.
 
Upvote 1
OP
L

lostandrare

Jr. Member
Sep 13, 2015
36
33
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #7
Theoretically Missouri should not have obsidian - no volcanos. It is probably glass slag.
I am inclined after doing some looking at pics and such using the search term "glassy slag" that you are probably right. Just a wierd place for a single piece of it to be found. Nothing similar around the fossil bed. No old railroads in the immediate vicinity.
 
Upvote 0
OP
L

lostandrare

Jr. Member
Sep 13, 2015
36
33
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #8
is it at all translucent? Overall it looks like a black siliceous stone of which there are many. Think of it as "black jasper."
When I back light it with a flashlight it is translucent on the edges and thinner side. Now I am second guessing my agreement on it being slag since what I am reading says slag is completely opaque.
 
Upvote 0

Older The Better

Bronze Member
Apr 24, 2017
2,282
4,078
south east kansas
Detector(s) used
Whites Eagle Spectrum
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Those little pock marks have me leaning slag but there is a black flint here in se ks that could easily be present in mo too. I just took this picture the other day of a frog on a flake of the material. Problem is I’ve never seen the raw material in that melted glassy form it usually comes in little arched pieces with ridges… kinda like fragments of smashed clay pipe.
94BCCEFD-2EB8-441F-B2A3-5256589EDBCB.jpeg
9DBFB49B-BF70-4B29-BCB6-E88C4A4353B3.jpeg
 
Upvote 1

Scrounge Wanderer

Hero Member
Jan 1, 2022
673
2,171
NOVA
Detector(s) used
Nokta Makro Anfibio Multi
Human Eyeball
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
Those little pock marks have me leaning slag but there is a black flint here in se ks that could easily be present in mo too. I just took this picture the other day of a frog on a flake of the material. Problem is I’ve never seen the raw material in that melted glassy form it usually comes in little arched pieces with ridges… kinda like fragments of smashed clay pipe. View attachment 2035325 View attachment 2035326
thats a right nice shot
 
Upvote 1

Scrounge Wanderer

Hero Member
Jan 1, 2022
673
2,171
NOVA
Detector(s) used
Nokta Makro Anfibio Multi
Human Eyeball
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
I will have to Google some examples. just don't know how Slag glass get embedded under with bracheopod and bivalve fossils? The brownish material mixed in with the black is what had the fossils in it that made me want to poke around. When I break open rocks of that brownish type the interior is grey with small crystals (calcite?)
I certainly maybe wrong just a gut reaction, good luck on the ID its an interesting piece
 
Upvote 0

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top