✅ SOLVED JAMES DIXON & SONS WARRANTED

antiquesglory

Tenderfoot
Dec 22, 2021
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Hello. I'm new to this forum and just joined. I need help identifying this JAMES DIXON & SONS WARRANTED item. I found metal detecting in Charleston SC on a property dating back to the 18th 19th century. there was a house site on the property dating back to the 1800s. I do not know what this is off of. I have seen JAMES DIXON & SONS. But I never seen WARRANTED can anybody tell me what warranted means on this? I want to know what age this dates to. If anybody knows I gladly appreciate it.
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Bramblefind

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What a neat find! It looks like it could be something like this this --



This is for an early, circa 1830, English Gibson medicine spoon, otherwise known as the castor oil spoon. It was first introduce in 1827 by Charles Gibson as an effective way of administering medicine to invalids and the sick. This early example is believed to be made of pewter but has not been tested. This spoon is 5.5" long. The hinge is tight and the flap closes securely. Opening the flap reveals the number 99 on the floor of the bowl. There are no dents, dings or repairs. There is staining of the surface and it deserves a proper polishing. The top of the spoon is engraved "James Dixon & Son, Warranted". Bennion on page 252 of her text noted that "The use of the Gibson spoon spread rapidly and was soon listed in no less than three sizes by J.S. Maw and Dixon of Sheffield. This is a prized addition to any medical antiques collection. See images for condition. Questions are welcome.
 

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Red-Coat

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What a neat find! It looks like it could be something like this this --


Neat find, and a good ID. That's what it is sure enough.

There’s more detailed information abut the how and the why of “Gibson’s Medicinal Spoon” at the link below, taken from contemporary documentation (but note that the Royal Society refers to Charles Gibson as ‘G. Gibson’ in error):

https://www.925-1000.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=40362

You haven’t said whether yours is silver or pewter, but I’m assuming not silver since you haven’t mentioned any hallmarks. The spoons were made by several manufacturers in silver from 1828, and then pewter versions began appearing around 1835.

The word "warranted" does not usually in itself give you much in the way of dating information. It has two potential meanings: either just as an indication that the quality or longevity of the piece is backed by a guarantee; or as an indication that a maker has been given permission for something. In this case, it might be an acknowledgement that Dixon was using Gibson's design by permission or under license.

Although the rest of the wording is a bit worn to the right hand side, it doesn't look as if there's a letter 'S' on the end of the word 'SON', and the symmetry of the spacing also suggests that it's 'SON' and not ‘SONS’. That would put it between c.1823-1835 from a company naming point of view, and further narrowed down since the spoon wasn’t invented until 1828.
 
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antiquesglory

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Dec 22, 2021
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Neat find, and a good ID. That's what it is sure enough.

There’s more detailed information abut the how and the why of “Gibson’s Medicinal Spoon” at the link below, taken from contemporary documentation (but note that the Royal Society refers to Charles Gibson as ‘G. Gibson’ in error):

(deleted by mod, rule infraction)

You haven’t said whether yours is silver or pewter, but I’m assuming not silver since you haven’t mentioned any hallmarks. The spoons were made by several manufacturers in silver from 1828, and then pewter versions began appearing around 1835.

The word "warranted" does not usually in itself give you much in the way of dating information. It has two potential meanings: either just as an indication that the quality or longevity of the piece is backed by a guarantee; or as an indication that a maker has been given permission for something. In this case, it might be an acknowledgement that Dixon was using Gibson's design by permission or under license.

Although the rest of the wording is a bit worn to the right hand side, it doesn't look as if there's a letter 'S' on the end of the word 'SON', and the symmetry of the spacing also suggests that it's 'SON' and not ‘SONS’. That would put it between c.1823-1835 from a company naming point of view, and further narrowed down since the spoon wasn’t invented until 1828.
Thank you Very much for your help. Solved.
 
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antiquesglory

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Dec 22, 2021
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Gare

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Let me welcome you to the forum. I have no idea as to what you have there sorry
 
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