Tonnes

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Dec 2, 2021
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What can you say about LiDAR 3D Scanner using Satellites and Drones?

Are there proven treasure finds using LiDAR technology that can scan more than 40 meters underground?

 

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Gare

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Thank you for posting this
 

Gare

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Presently using Deus's have Minelabs, Nokta's Tesoro's Have them all . Have WAY to many need to get rid of some
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What can you say about LiDAR 3D Scanner using Satellites and Drones?

Are there proven treasure finds using LiDAR technology that can scan more than 40 meters underground?

Tonnes let me ALSO WELCOME you to a VERY FINE FORUM!!!
 

Clay Diggins

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Nov 14, 2010
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LIDAR is short for "LIght Detection And Ranging".

Light does not penetrate the ground at all. That's how LIDAR works. You shoot a laser at the ground or a solid object and the laser light is reflected back to the LIDAR unit where the distance it traveled is calculated according to how long it took the light to return.

Neither LASERs (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) nor Lidar can penetrate the earth to any depth.

So no - LIDAR never found anything underground at any depth.
 

thormchammer

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Timbered regions of the PNW.
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LIDAR is short for "LIght Detection And Ranging".

Light does not penetrate the ground at all. That's how LIDAR works. You shoot a laser at the ground or a solid object and the laser light is reflected back to the LIDAR unit where the distance it traveled is calculated according to how long it took the light to return.

Neither LASERs (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) nor Lidar can penetrate the earth to any depth.

So no - LIDAR never found anything underground at any depth.
I have used LIDAR mapping in forestry. I can say, it penetrates vegetation EXTREMELY well. In Mendocino we used LIDAR mapping to identify 1800’s wagon trails in almost impenetrable tan oak. In widely wariable redwood stands (including true virgin old growth) we identified landslides. Across the whole ownership it showed house pits, old rail grades and a hole host of other things. I don’t know about penetrating the ground, but with what we were using, houses did not appear, but their foundation dugouts did.
 

thormchammer

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Timbered regions of the PNW.
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I have used LIDAR mapping in forestry. I can say, it penetrates vegetation EXTREMELY well. In Mendocino we used LIDAR mapping to identify 1800’s wagon trails in almost impenetrable tan oak. In widely wariable redwood stands (including true virgin old growth) we identified landslides. Across the whole ownership it showed house pits, old rail grades and a hole host of other things. I don’t know about penetrating the ground, but with what we were using, houses did not appear, but their foundation dugouts did.
This was a project for the state. This type of aerial photogrammetry is not common as it is extremely expensive. I wish there were public banks of these flights for research and what not, but there is very limited access to these maps. I would share them, but I do t work for that company anymore, and I don’t have access to those maps. Sorry fellas. You’ll just have to take my work.
 

thormchammer

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Timbered regions of the PNW.
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So I found an example of it DOGAMI Oregon Bare Earth LiDAR scans. This is in my town. Those dark shades are all buildings. The scan penetrates those buildings. You might look for stuff like this in your areas. Now that I found it, I’ll certainly be using it for my research.
 

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Clay Diggins

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The LIDAR actually "sees" the vegetation and everything. It's only in processing the LIDAR data after it's been recorded that those objects are removed through averaging. Averaging throws out most of the scan data so the resolution is quite a bit lower for bare ground LIDAR than the original scan.

LIDAR itself does not distinguish between vegetation, structures etc but with processing you can derive where "ground" will be if the ground cover isn't too thick and you scan a dense enough grid.

LIDAR isn't magic. it takes ground stations as well as aerial laser scanning to obtain any accuracy. The more ground stations you set up and the higher the scan density the better the resolution.

LIDAR of a relatively low resolution is publicly available for free from the government. Most LIDAR available is no better than the hand made DEMs (Digital Elevation Model) we have been using for the last 50 years. Generally that's 10 foot resolution so only objects larger than 30 - 50 feet across are reliably recognizable. Higher resolution is available near the coasts and around pet government projects.

If you want to try using LIDAR products check out the 3DEP map project at the USGS.
Or you can learn more about the governments ongoing 3DEP LIDAR project and get LIDAR downloads here:
 

Clay Diggins

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Nov 14, 2010
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I've done quite a bit of 3D mapping with LIDAR and aerial photos. Here's an example showing the Moki Dugway in Utah. It's one heck of a road - only about 32 miles long but it takes about 40 minutes to drive on average. A lot of people won't even try to drive it when they get there but with this 3D interactive map you can explore without vertigo.

http://www.mylandmatters.org/3D/Duck_Goose.html

This map is big and it's going to take a while to load in your web browser but when it does you can quickly move the 3D model around with your mouse (click and drag), zoom in and out (scroll) and there's a little "i" you can click on in the bottom left corner that will show you how to make it do tricks.

Oh... and if you miss the vertigo just type "r". :happy2:

Enjoy! :thumbsup:
 
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Tonnes

Tonnes

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Dec 2, 2021
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LIDAR is short for "LIght Detection And Ranging".

Light does not penetrate the ground at all. That's how LIDAR works. You shoot a laser at the ground or a solid object and the laser light is reflected back to the LIDAR unit where the distance it traveled is calculated according to how long it took the light to return.

Neither LASERs (Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) nor Lidar can penetrate the earth to any depth.

So no - LIDAR never found anything underground at any depth.
Yes you are right about LiDAR.

What I forgot to mention on the original post is the use of GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) combined with 3D Laser Scanning (LiDAR) which are both attached to a space satellite used on the images I attached (top view & side view).

GPR is used to penetrate water, trees and soil while LiDAR is for surface scanning only.

They are both used to confirm the location and depth of the hidden treasures.

See additional reference below.
 

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pepperj

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I've done quite a bit of 3D mapping with LIDAR and aerial photos. Here's an example showing the Moki Dugway in Utah. It's one heck of a road - only about 32 miles long but it takes about 40 minutes to drive on average. A lot of people won't even try to drive it when they get there but with this 3D interactive map you can explore without vertigo.

http://www.mylandmatters.org/3D/Duck_Goose.html

This map is big and it's going to take a while to load in your web browser but when it does you can quickly move the 3D model around with your mouse (click and drag), zoom in and out (scroll) and there's a little "i" you can click on in the bottom left corner that will show you how to make it do tricks.

Oh... and if you miss the vertigo just type "r". :happy2:

Enjoy! :thumbsup:
That's pretty good road then to do those speeds. Cool imaging of the area and the topography. Got to see hte elevation from one switchback to another to get a sense of how much there was.
Then again from growing up mountains and having traveling many a goat trails, one gets use to a few drop offs....
Should just say view points, higher the better, especially when we were kids=rocks being tossed over. :laughing7:

I wish the LIDAR was more readily available for my area-might be for a fee based, though in the public domain nothing yet has been done.
 
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Tonnes

Tonnes

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See what happens when LiDAR 3D Laser Scanning and High Density Array GPR were merged.

 

Gare

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Dec 30, 2012
3,206
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Canton Ohio Area
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Presently using Deus's have Minelabs, Nokta's Tesoro's Have them all . Have WAY to many need to get rid of some
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Does anyone else use Lidar on here ?
 

TriEye

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Jan 7, 2022
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The National Map https://apps.nationalmap.gov/viewer/

The National Map is my source for quick lidar images of anywhere in the U.S. The ability to view a free easily accessable Lidar image of the landscape through a thick canopy of trees really is a game changer for anyone exploring outdoors. I've used it to find house foundations, old wagon roads, mill sites, ancient mounds, even wells. It really is an amazing tool and I'm surprised I haven't seen it mentioned by anyone on these forums. When on the map viewer, zoom to your area of interest, then click the layers icon and scroll down the Layers List and select either
3DEP Elevation- Hillshade
3DEP Elevation- Multidirectional Hillshade
3DEP Elevation- Hillshade Streched
I've found that you can see some land features on one layer that are invisible on others. Check it out
 

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