Makita Rotary Hammers compared or what you think.

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Anyone use the following Makita Rotary hammers and what do you think?

Makita HR4510C 1-3/4" AVT1/2 Rotary Hammer; Accepts SDS-MAX Bits

https://www.toolnut.com/power-tools...vt1-2-rotary-hammer-accepts-sds-max-bits.html

· Powerful 13.5 AMP motor; 1,250-2,750 BPM to handle the most demanding jobs

· Anti-Vibration Technology is an internal counterbalance system that greatly reduces vibration and directs more impact energy to the work surface for increased user comfort and greater productivity

· Constant speed control automatically applies additional power to the motor to maintain speed under load to complete the most challenging jobs

· Soft start suppresses start-up reaction for more control and better accuracy

· Variable speed control dial enables user to match the speed to the application for greater versatility

DeWalt DW5830 1-3/4" x 18" x 22-1/2" 4 Cutter SDS MAX Rotary Hammer Bit​

https://www.toolnut.com/dewalt-dw5830-1-3-4-x-18-x-22-1-2-4-cutter-sds-max-rotary-hammer-bit.html



Makita GRH06PM 80V (40V X2) XGT Brushless 2-inch AVT SDS-MAX Rotary Hammer 4.0Ah Kit​

https://www.toolnut.com/makita-grh0...Pg_F0NgrobPm7CzuLKBIHCH77POmBLlBoCpUkQAvD_BwE

The 80V max (40V max X2) XGT Brushless 2 AVT Rotary Hammer Kit (GRH06PM) is a cordless concrete solution designed for heavy-load applications. It delivers the power, speed, and run-time for corded demands, without the cord.

The GRH06PM is powered by two 40V max lithium-ion batteries, with an 80V brushless motor that delivers up to 27% faster drilling performance than an equivalent corded model. This hard-hitting performance is combined with advanced comfort and convenience features including Active Feedback-Sensing Technology (AFT), which electronically turns off the motor if rotation of bit is suddenly forced to stop. It is also equipped with Anti-Vibration Technology (AVT) for reduced vibration. More than just a padded handle, AVT is an internal counterbalance that uses air pressure to move counterweight pistons in the opposite direction of the drive piston to actively reduce vibration. In addition, the vibration-absorbing back handle and side handle are engineered to further reduce vibration. For added durability in harsh job site conditions, Extreme Protection Technology (XPT) is engineered for improved dust and water resistance.

https://www.cpooutlets.com/makita-g...9q76n6VH78OfaePKi5J-0GeOdx7SxIAhoC-xQQAvD_BwE
 

BlasterJ

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How big are the holes you want to make and in what kind of rock? Do you need cordless or is 110V available? The big SDS MAX drills are kind of at the cutoff of when you should consider looking at a pneumatic drill.
 
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How big are the holes you want to make and in what kind of rock? Do you need cordless or is 110V available? The big SDS MAX drills are kind of at the cutoff of when you should consider looking at a pneumatic drill.
a pneumatic drill may require a frame to help steady and is not easy to use on steep slopes that you may need to stand on at least at first.

I'm thinking that 110v is the way to go unless there is a 80 - 90 vdc available or an adapter cable. Then the cordless can be used either way depending on fire season or very steep slope etc.

These electric drills are easier on a starting budget and can be thrown away if more production is needed later on.

The holes are for probing as well as light blasting etc.
 

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I worked maintenance in a steel mill for years. Drilled many holes in concrete for various reasons. Didn't think there was much difference in corded hammer drills until I used a Hilti hammer drill.
Wow, the difference was huge. Find a buddy that will let you test one. Not sure what the difference is, but the Hilti just walked on through concrete. Good luck!
Bob
 
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I worked maintenance in a steel mill for years. Drilled many holes in concrete for various reasons. Didn't think there was much difference in corded hammer drills until I used a Hilti hammer drill.
Wow, the difference was huge. Find a buddy that will let you test one. Not sure what the difference is, but the Hilti just walked on through concrete. Good luck!
Bob
I'm willing to take a look thanks.
 
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I worked maintenance in a steel mill for years. Drilled many holes in concrete for various reasons. Didn't think there was much difference in corded hammer drills until I used a Hilti hammer drill.
Wow, the difference was huge. Find a buddy that will let you test one. Not sure what the difference is, but the Hilti just walked on through concrete. Good luck!
Bob
Metabo HPT DH45MEYM 1-3/4-Inch SDS Max AC Brushless Rotary Hammer with AHB and UVP

https://www.toolnut.com/power-tools...ac-brushless-rotary-hammer-w-ahb-and-uvp.html

$719.97

  • Uses popular SDS max bits
The DH45MEYM 1-3/4 In. SDS max Brushless rotary hammer is the newest rotary hammer in the Hitachi lineup. With the highest drilling and demolition speed in it's class, this hammer is made for hard work. It is constructed with the new AHB (Aluminum housing body) construction that provides significant durability and extended tool life. (UVP) (User vibration protection) technology provides vibration protection by first utilizing a polymer coated vibration absorbing handle, then lessening vibration even more with the use of an internal counter balance. The Brushless motor provides a no-maintenance tool so you don't have to stop working to perform routine carbon brush changes. Brushless technology also allows you to run the tool on a portable generator and not worry about work being slowed by voltage drop under loads. The DH45MEYM should be the next tool in your jobsite arsenal.

Metabo HPT DH52MEYM 2-1/16-Inch SDS Max AC Brushless Rotary Hammer with AHB and UVP

https://www.toolnut.com/power-tools...ac-brushless-rotary-hammer-w-ahb-and-uvp.html


$829.97

 

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The most powerful electric rockdrill I was ever aware of was the Hilti TE MD 20. I believe Hilti may have given up on that idea as it really couldn't compete with the power of pneumatic drills, but it did have its perks over some issues that pneumatic drills experience in very deep mines or at least that's what the Hilti reps were telling me at a trade show some time ago.
 
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BlasterJ

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My experience is as follows:

1. For holes 3/4" or smaller, a smaller SDS+ rotary hammer is actually faster. It has less power, but more repetitions per minute. This is what you want on small holes for the Sierra Blaster/etc.

2. You can rent SDS Max tools from a lot of places such as United. I tested out the Hilti cordless SDS Max for a paper I wrote this year about underground rescue. I think they will all be somewhat similar. If you're going cordless, check into the battery situation. Some (like the Makita I think) let you strap on two smaller battery packs instead of buying a dedicated high voltage pack. Your existing tool collection might be more of a factor.

3. If it's surface blasting, you might consider a gasoline-powered Pionjar or Cobra-Combi. These can drill a 1.5" hole 4' deep in most rock and can be pushed to 6' by a skilled operator.

For blasting products, it's hard to find dynamite or emulsion under about 1.25" diameter. Although it theoretically exists in the catalog, most distributors only stock the larger sizes. Your best bet for small-scale blasting would probably be either the 1/3lb Kinepak cartridges (1 1/4x7") or one of the 20-32mm rock breaking cartridges from Royex, NXBurst or Autostem. It is feasible to drill holes for these products using an electric SDS MAX drill.

Kinepak:
NXBurst:
Royex:
Autostem:

I was able to get 1-2 18" deep holes per battery with the Hilti cordless and 1 1/4" diameter bits. Drilling gets exponentially slower and more power-intensive as the hole diameter goes up. Figure 18" deep holes as a minimum for any of these products to work well. You need 2-3 cartridge lenghts of good stemming for the rock breakers to work.

Electric is nice because it's low-profile and you don't need a compressor trailer. They make pneumatic rock drills as small as 9lbs. The SDS Max is more like a hand-held 15lb air drill in terms of power. You can handle a 30lb sinker drill on a steep incline if you're careful and it drills a LOT faster.
 
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The idea with a 1" or larger hole is the amount of surface area for any type of impact to work on. Think of the size of a piston with hydraulics when there is more surface area for a lower pressure to do the same amount of work as a deeper smaller hole. The use of a water mud pack is important.

Yep it is faster to drill a smaller hole. I'm thinking of the surface area of the hole.
 
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A larger bore is able to deliver more energy at the end of it as far as impact goes. A charge at the end of the hole is always going to be better then one at the other end however it will cost more as a general rule.

Anyone willing to hammer on 2" and wider steel pins at the top of each one of these holes. This is how it is done by hand.
 
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The rock needs to prove itself in order for a bigger budget to come in to play.

A somewhat inexpensive electric drill can be recovered in a fairly short time if the rock is worth working on. A lower grade of material can also be worked on before a better grade of material comes along.

This also can fit in better with most peoples starting budgets. If the electric drill lasts 1 - 4 years can be not that big of a deal if you like being out there with some hard work.
 
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Heck for starting out one can buy standard 2" wide steel wedges for around about $20.00 per hole at $10.00 each (2 wedges per hole) and a $25 -$35.00 sledge hammer and split a few boulder size rocks to get a real idea what is there in a ton to a few tons of rock.

The electric drill is fast enough in general to make 2" size holes even if it take a number of hours per hole. This is way faster then most people can do by hand.

Some of the slopes I'm thinking of are around 55 - 60 degrees.
 
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It looks like inflation has the price of steel wedges closer to $20.00 or more now each.

Looks like I will look for some used ones. I do have 7 right now. I may look for old mall heads as well.
 

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Just to put in some experience, we bought an SDS-Max Electric drill from Harbor Freight about 7 years ago. I know they have changed a little since then, but probably for the better. We bought a 1 1/2" x 6' Carbide-tipped drill out of Canada through eBay for about $120.00. We have drilled probably 50 holes with it since then, and both the drill motor and drill are still going. For the price, you can't beat it.

Not fancy names, but does the job. We also have been using the Harbor Freight demolition electric hammers, from the smallest to the largest, and have removed probably 100 tons of material over time. They are all still going strong, the best bang for the buck you could ask for.
 
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Just to put in some experience, we bought an SDS-Max Electric drill from Harbor Freight about 7 years ago. I know they have changed a little since then, but probably for the better. We bought a 1 1/2" x 6' Carbide-tipped drill out of Canada through eBay for about $120.00. We have drilled probably 50 holes with it since then, and both the drill motor and drill are still going. For the price, you can't beat it.

Not fancy names, but does the job. We also have been using the Harbor Freight demolition electric hammers, from the smallest to the largest, and have removed probably 100 tons of material over time. They are all still going strong, the best bang for the buck you could ask for.
I agree with your thoughts on the demolition electric hammer.

The drill does not compare thought it will be good for a smaller number of holes.
 

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$700-800 for an electric drill is within spitting distance of a used pneumatic unit that will handily outperform the electric. UR will rent you a 185 CFM compressor if you don't want to drop several thousand dollars on buying your own.

The last jackleg drill I bought was a Gardner Denver S83 with a muffler. Only ran me $1100, and jacklegs always go for more than sinkers.

I'm not saying to avoid electric hammer drills, but rather to not spend too much money on one.
 
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$700-800 for an electric drill is within spitting distance of a used pneumatic unit that will handily outperform the electric. UR will rent you a 185 CFM compressor if you don't want to drop several thousand dollars on buying your own.

The last jackleg drill I bought was a Gardner Denver S83 with a muffler. Only ran me $1100, and jacklegs always go for more than sinkers.

I'm not saying to avoid electric hammer drills, but rather to not spend too much money on one.
The area I'm thinking about the 185 CFM compressor is out of question. However if some of the rock is moved to a nearby road that would work out great.

Looks like I need to also shop for a used pneumatic unit of some kind. I will look into Gardner Denver units thank you.
 
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Maybe a small hydraulic drill would work due to the steep slope. If it breaks down to compact parts I could winch out there.
 
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I'm thinking the answer to your question is, No.8-)
Yep there may be few out there using a electric rotary hammer drills. The slope of the ground may be the real reason for one to even think about it. Under ground can bring in other types of equipment.
 

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