Makita Rotary Hammers compared or what you think.

BlasterJ

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Yep there may be few out there using a electric rotary hammer drills. The slope of the ground may be the real reason for one to even think about it. Under ground can bring in other types of equipment.
This little CP-15 drill is easy to use on steep slopes and can drill a 1" or 1.25" hole about 30" deep. It has roughly the power of the best electric, a lot more air flush and uses the same 7/8" hexagonal drill steels that my big drill does.
 

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BlasterJ

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If you want more power, the APT-137 and similar 30lb air drills are a LOT easier to manhandle than a 55lb sinker or an S83 and still have enough power to drill big holes up to 6' deep. If you're drilling on near-vertical rock, then the air-powered leg is really nice to have. People use those jackleg drills above ground too.
 

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If you want more power, the APT-137 and similar 30lb air drills are a LOT easier to manhandle than a 55lb sinker or an S83 and still have enough power to drill big holes up to 6' deep. If you're drilling on near-vertical rock, then the air-powered leg is really nice to have. People use those jackleg drills above ground too.
Small enough to fit in a tote box, nice. Even Harbor freight electric hammer does not do that.......lol.

I will start with what I can on the surface boulders then move to air tools for sure. Thanks for the tips BlasterJ.
 

BlasterJ

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The main disadvantage here is that even the "baby" air drills require more air than all but the biggest portable air compressors can keep up with. You pretty much always end up just renting the trailer-mounted units from a tool rental yard.
 
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The main disadvantage here is that even the "baby" air drills require more air than all but the biggest portable air compressors can keep up with. You pretty much always end up just renting the trailer-mounted units from a tool rental yard.
Yep that's right. The slope I'm looking at is near 60 degrees in spots so a large air compressor is not in the picture right now (a lot of the slope is near 50 degrees). I know the small electric drills are good for boulder type of rocks on this type of ground. I have not pinpointed very much of the rock out crops yet plus the fires around here have shut down a lot of roads with a $5,000.00 penalty if you are caught on these road with out a claim going on. Not like in California as far as a lot of roads shut down.

Yep I'm not all excited about looking at electric drills. I know air is a better way to go.
 
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I think I now know what I'm going to do for a drill. It is a 2 1/2 -3 HP 2cycle snowblower engine with pulley output shaft with a belt coupled to a 4 speed lawnmower very small gearbox.

Now I'm shopping for a SDS-max chuck on a pillow block shaft with a belt drive. This should give more driving power then a electric drill. I may have to make a simple frame for this.
 
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This setup will not have any hammering action however I think it will have some more actual power at the drill bit. Maybe some weight on the drill will help.
 
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I will most likely have to machine a shaft for the chuck. I'm even willing to weld on a chuck.
 
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Why weld the chuck on when your machining the shaft anyway . why not cut some threads on that shaft since your machining it anyway !
Don't know what is available yet chuck wise.
 
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A tapered shaft for your chuck may be stronger than a threaded shaft.... You may want to consider it as a option.........
Correct and if you can not thread the tapered shaft is easier to do.

This is also why I'm thinking of just welding the chuck on. I did see a few chucks that are on a adapter shaft. I'm still looking.
 

HardRockNM

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I think I now know what I'm going to do for a drill. It is a 2 1/2 -3 HP 2cycle snowblower engine with pulley output shaft with a belt coupled to a 4 speed lawnmower very small gearbox.

Now I'm shopping for a SDS-max chuck on a pillow block shaft with a belt drive. This should give more driving power then a electric drill. I may have to make a simple frame for this.
That sounds like a Pionjar with extra steps!
 
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That sounds like a Pionjar with extra steps!
The Pionjar I have looked at are hammers. What I'm thinking of making is only a drill. Plus I have the engine and the gear box. I should make a correction that the gearbox is really a 3 speed with a reverse gear. What I need to find is the right chuck on a shaft that can be turned into a jackshaft with likely a chain final drive.
 
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So far I'm not finding very good SDS - Max chucks to work with. I'm thinking of a coupler with the right key ways from drive shaft to drill bit. Maybe even a tapered shaft type of coupler with key ways.
 

BlasterJ

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The Pionjar works similar to a pneumatic rock drill - it hammers, then rotates, and makes compressed air to send down the center of the drill steel. It has a 185cc 2-stroke engine.
 
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The Pionjar works similar to a pneumatic rock drill - it hammers, then rotates, and makes compressed air to send down the center of the drill steel. It has a 185cc 2-stroke engine.
I may go get one. I still want to see if a gas drill can be made.
 

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I worked maintenance in a steel mill for years. Drilled many holes in concrete for various reasons. Didn't think there was much difference in corded hammer drills until I used a Hilti hammer drill.
Wow, the difference was huge. Find a buddy that will let you test one. Not sure what the difference is, but the Hilti just walked on through concrete. Good luck!
Bob

I worked maintenance in a steel mill for years. Drilled many holes in concrete for various reasons. Didn't think there was much difference in corded hammer drills until I used a Hilti hammer drill.
Wow, the difference was huge. Find a buddy that will let you test one. Not sure what the difference is, but the Hilti just walked on through concrete. Good luck!
Bob
Hard to beat those Hilti tools, if all you have is electric...
Gt.....
 

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