Oak Island Factual (proven/documented) Information

ECS

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As disorganized as the Welsh tribes were in 600 AD it does make you wonder who among them could have fielded 70,000 troops. Let alone floated then in stick and hide corracles. Or dared leave that much of a vacuum behind for the neighbors to take advantage of.

Truly the "cockleshell navy".

What is never taken into account is that the population in Wales was decimated in 535-536AD due to Extreme weather conditions which caused a great famine causing the deaths of a quarter of the population followed by a great plague in 549AD killing a third of the remaining Welsh population.
How many Welsh existed among the highly disorganized Welsh tribal kingdoms that 70,000 heading out to sea in those hide covered wicker baskets would not be a major concern.
 
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Singlestack Wonder

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2 days and counting since franklin stated he would release proof of the treasures he claims he’s found.

Nah.....don’t want to post this everyday as it would be a lifetime daily commitment....
 

ECS

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... Can't you understand I haven't the time to spare.
Franklin has plenty of time to spare posting fabricated pseudo-history fantasies as fact, insulting other members who post documented facts counter to his alternative histories while claiming them wrong.
It appears that the only time he can't spare is posting true facts that support his unproven fringe tales of make believe history.
 
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Singlestack Wonder

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824 posts and not one of the promoters of the hoax island treasure have provided any evidence to back up their claims.
 

ECS

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Most likely, as with Franklin, they don't have "time to spare" when its comes to producing actual hard documented facts. :wink:
 
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Singlestack Wonder

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826 posts and still no one has been able to provide a single piece of evidence from the past two hundred years that a money pit or treasure ever existed on hoax island…
 

gazzahk

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Now now.. What about their recent microscopic find of GOLD!!!!!

Not only that but it was ROSE GOLD..........

Therefore only one conclusion is possible. Ancient Inca or Aztec treasure MUST be (or have been) buried there... How else could this tiniest of microscopic traces have gotten into the pit... It is not like people have been dumping all types of rubbish into the pit area for hundreds of years or something...

madscientist.jpg
 
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Now now.. What about their recent microscopic find of GOLD!!!!!

Not only that but it was ROSE GOLD..........

Therefore only one conclusion is possible. Ancient Inca or Aztec treasure MUST be (or have been) buried there... How else could this tiniest of microscopic traces have gotten into the pit... It is not like people have been dumping all types of rubbish into the pit area for hundreds of years or something...

View attachment 1995808
LOL.....828 posts and still no evidence....
 
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#830 posts and still not one factual piece of evidence proving a money pit, treasure, or any of the other fictional tales about hoax island is true.

Particles of gold, rose gold, the lagina’s dump truck of silver, etc, prove nothing.

Ive found gold several times metal detecting but I was unable to locate a massive treasure hoard under it.
 

gazzahk

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#830 posts and still not one factual piece of evidence proving a money pit, treasure, or any of the other fictional tales about hoax island is true.

Particles of gold, rose gold, the lagina’s dump truck of silver, etc, prove nothing.

Ive found gold several times metal detecting but I was unable to locate a massive treasure hoard under it.
ha ha... You did not look hard enough... The treasure was a little bit deeper....


laugh.jpg
 

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gazzahk

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Yes, and their modern day composition is quite different than the Tumbaga gold which more closely resembles these samples.
lol.. Microscopic traces are not really samples my friend. They were so tiny they could of just been environmental contamination. These traces were magnified between 10,000 to 20,000 times.

You will not find any expert that would put any weighting on such microscopic traces as evidence of actual treasure being buried in the area.

An interesting anomaly at best I would think...
 

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I just dropped in to see what’s new and if things here have improved (they haven’t) and wondered what might constitute ‘proven / documented’ in this thread. I take it from the OP and recent posts that emphasis might be placed on the historical, so I thought I might throw into the mix something from one of my books that may be of historical interest (to some) in the context of Oak Island.

Of the original Acadian settlements the nearest to Oak Island, La Have, was founded in 1632. One contemporary author, Nicolas Denys, in his book Description of North America tells of a journey into Mahone Bay some time before 1635. He writes:

“Leaving La Haive, and having rounded Cape Doré about a league, one enters the bay of Mirlingaiche [Lunenburg] which is about three leagues in depth, and filled by many islands ... we went right to the head of this bay, where we found some ... fine islands filled in part with great oaks.”

Denys was heavily involved in the lumber trade, operating two timber yards. He observes that the red oak was of no value for shipbuilding. It was his business to know the suitability of different types of wood, what timber was available and where it might be found. The above account is uncompromising. It reports a number of islands part-filled with oak trees in Mahone Bay, not just one (plusieurs autres belles Isles remplies en partie de grands chesnes.)

Had there been more than one oak-bearing island in the bay at that time then the early settlers must have denuded all but Oak Island. Denys was writing some twenty-five years after the events described, and may have confused a number of islands with a number of sites. He notes that there were other locations on the mainland bearing red oaks at that time.

If there was only one such island then Denys may well be making the first recorded mention of Oak Island. Irrespective of how many oak-bearing islands there were, one may reasonably conclude that Oak Island, under whatever name, had been identified prior to 1635, the year in which the guest of honour on this journey, Isaac de Razilly, died.

The report by Nicolas Denys suggests that he may have had a timber yard, or a place where timber was prepared, at the head of the bay. The narrative provides a brief description of Mahone Bay as being full of islands, provides two anecdotes concerning a certain journey into the bay, and continues with a description of the coast to Halifax and beyond. Denys reports:

“Continuing our route we landed at the place where my people worked timber for carpentry and planking ... seeing so great a quantity of timber, and in such good condition.”

Here the group sat down to a hearty meal, the ever-practical Denys showing some concern about having his people hunting game rather than preparing timber. The next paragraph continues:

“Leaving the bay going along the coast, at three or four leagues from there one finds a river having two entrances formed by an island in the middle. On the shore of the first entrance there are ... big and beautiful trees.”

This location has been identified as the present-day site of Prospect. The anecdote interspersed in this narrative implies a voyage into Mahone Bay to a lumber camp in the vicinity of what is now Chester. Denys clearly states that the group went to the far ends of the bay (jusques au fonds), then continued their journey and subsequently ate at his timber yard (continuant nostre chemin nous abordâmes au lieu où mon monde travailloit....)

Denys seems to be saying, “We left La Have, rounded Cape Doré, entered Mahone Bay and journeyed to its end, finding islands with oak trees, continuing our journey to a place where we ate. We left the bay, and a few leagues from there reached Prospect.”

I feel that Denys’s account provides an indication that the early settlers were felling and preparing timber some way to the west of Prospect in the vicinity of Oak Island. Furthermore, there is a high probability that Denys could be referring to or including Oak Island when he mentions islands part-filled with oaks.

MahoneLeagues.jpg

Figure: A possible route followed by Nicolas Denys c. 1635. The numbers on the course plotted represent leagues of 4,000 toises (fathoms).

In any event, there was clearly some interest and activity at the north of Mahone Bay from the earliest days of settlement (some sources suggest that Lunenburg was first settled in the 1630s.) The oak trees would have been in great demand, more likely for construction than shipbuilding, and appear to have been more widespread in the bay at that time.

In the business of preparing timber, it is possible that Denys (or even the originator) helped denude other islands of oak trees. Denys or his crews, or later groups, may even have operated from Oak Island, and the skidways and jetty could, perhaps, be relics of that purpose.

Equally, the existence of an established base for the preparation of timber at the head of Mahone Bay, and possibly for its export, would have provided cover for an entirely different operation on Oak Island at any time.

Perhaps, the reason that nobody ever commented on activity on the island is that the ‘cover’ operation, the timber trade, was so commonplace as to be unworthy of mention. Such trade might even account for the link to the tropics - presumably, the West Indies. Acadia traded with the French Antilles at this time. Similar observations might apply also to the 18th century.

Admittedly, there’s some conjecture here, but it does seem that the island could have been noted and perhaps even visited from the early days of settlement with contemporary documentation pointing to this as a possibility.
 

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