Odd flaking

Older The Better

Bronze Member
Apr 24, 2017
2,131
3,766
south east kansas
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Whites Eagle Spectrum
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I may be diving too deep for information on this one but it just struck me as odd with the two different types and direction of flaking on the same piece, maybe there’s something to tease out on this, maybe it’s just a broke chunk. The side with the random flakes seems like your average woodland, but the other side seems like it could be a much older style. Anybody have any insight? Or am I trying too hard on this one?
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Upvote 2

uniface

Silver Member
Jun 4, 2009
3,172
2,809
Central Pennsylvania
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Notice that the little step fractures are on an edge opposite the side at a 90-degree angle to it. This identifies it as a specific tool form -- a piece esquille (splitting wedge, hammered by something soft enough [like wood] to drive it without fracturing it).

Your question concerning flake directions involves some complex considerations, but basically, it was once a larger biface that could have been a platter core (and fitting comfortably into the paleo reduction sequence, although there would have to be other artifacts nearby confirming this to make that temporal assignment more than speculative).

FWIW
 

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