Old Farm Hunt

ANTIQUARIAN

Gold Member
Apr 24, 2010
12,698
26,996
Upper Canada 🇨🇦
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
XP Deus, Lesche Piranha 35 Shovel & 'Garrett Carrot'
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
I got out for a few hours on Sunday morning before it got too humid. 🥵 I first detected this site in 2012, this property is now in the process of being developed for residential housing. The old barns will likely be coming down this week… I feel bad for all the birds that have used this barn as their home over the years. Detecting was a challenge here due to the amount of trash in the ground, as this house has been continuously occupied from 1850 until 2009. Nothing too exciting in the finds category, a suspender part, a flat button and a square silver-plated ‘what’s-it’. I thought the bricks looked old, so I brought a couple home and will re-purpose them in our back garden. :thumbsup:

Thanks very much for looking,
Dave

Ontario Paving Brick Company - Toronto

Original Location:
Part of the brick and tile industry located along Weston Road between St. Clair and Eglinton Avenues, which began in 1856 with the coming of the Grand Trunk Railway. The east side of Weston Road, south of Rogers Road, roughly opposite the block between Cayuga and Seneca Avenues. The CN rail line is behind it to the east. In Canada, brickmaking in an open yard was not a year-round activity. The season in Toronto usually opened in late April each year, once the local sand and heavy clay were workable and the days were dry and sunny enough for the bricks to air dry for several days before they were fired.

This company went into production in 1894 and in 1906 was still the only paving brick company in the province. The paving brick was used in the construction of the Union Stock Yards, which was entirely brick paved. It was used between the tracks of the Toronto Street Railway lines and for brick paving throughout the city. The company’s gray building brick was also used in stockyards construction. In 1902, William Pears, former Mayor of Toronto Junction (1894/95) was elected president of the company. He also became general manager. Mr. Pears lost all his property and business interests in the Depression of the 1930s. Although technically in York Township at the time, the company is described in directories and publications as being in Toronto Junction.

The first and only factory of its type in the province at the turn of the century gives it importance. In 1906, the company produced five million paving bricks and four million building bricks per year, along with an undisclosed number of sewer and sidewalk bricks.

Map Included: The 1899 Goad’s Atlas of Toronto shows the extensive brick fields of Carlton West and York Township. In 1906, the Might’s Directory of the Toronto Junction listed eight brick makers in the area. Richard Maxted worked for Titley & Frost, the brickmaker closest to McRoberts. It was just on the other side of the railroad tracks, at St. Clair, west of Campbell Avenue (now Prescott).


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Last edited:
Upvote 13
OP
ANTIQUARIAN

ANTIQUARIAN

Gold Member
Apr 24, 2010
12,698
26,996
Upper Canada 🇨🇦
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
XP Deus, Lesche Piranha 35 Shovel & 'Garrett Carrot'
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
Dave
Congratulations on your beautiful recoveries
Nice post with great detail
Thanks very much Bill, as always I appreciate your support! :occasion14:
Hope you were able to get out this weekend,
Dave
 

Digger RJ

Gold Member
Aug 24, 2017
15,812
27,567
SW Missouri/Oklahoma
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
2
Detector(s) used
Minelab CTX 3030; Minelab Equinox 800;
XP Deus 2
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I got out for a few hours on Sunday morning before it got too humid. 🥵 I first detected this site in 2012, this property is now in the process of being developed for residential housing. The old barns will likely be coming down this week… I feel bad for all the birds that have used this barn as their home over the years. Detecting was a challenge here due to the amount of trash in the ground, as this house has been continuously occupied from 1850 until 2009. Nothing too exciting in the finds category, a suspender part, a flat button and a square silver-plated ‘what’s-it’. I thought the bricks looked old, so I brought a couple home and will re-purpose them in our back garden. :thumbsup:

Thanks very much for looking,
Dave

Ontario Paving Brick Company - Toronto

Original Location:
Part of the brick and tile industry located along Weston Road between St. Clair and Eglinton Avenues, which began in 1856 with the coming of the Grand Trunk Railway. The east side of Weston Road, south of Rogers Road, roughly opposite the block between Cayuga and Seneca Avenues. The CN rail line is behind it to the east. In Canada, brickmaking in an open yard was not a year-round activity. The season in Toronto usually opened in late April each year, once the local sand and heavy clay were workable and the days were dry and sunny enough for the bricks to air dry for several days before they were fired.

This company went into production in 1894 and in 1906 was still the only paving brick company in the province. The paving brick was used in the construction of the Union Stock Yards, which was entirely brick paved. It was used between the tracks of the Toronto Street Railway lines and for brick paving throughout the city. The company’s gray building brick was also used in stockyards construction. In 1902, William Pears, former Mayor of Toronto Junction (1894/95) was elected president of the company. He also became general manager. Mr. Pears lost all his property and business interests in the Depression of the 1930s. Although technically in York Township at the time, the company is described in directories and publications as being in Toronto Junction.

The first and only factory of its type in the province at the turn of the century gives it importance. In 1906, the company produced five million paving bricks and four million building bricks per year, along with an undisclosed number of sewer and sidewalk bricks.

Map Included:

The 1899 Goad’s Atlas of Toronto shows the extensive brick fields of Carlton West and York Township. In 1906, the Might’s Directory of the Toronto Junction listed eight brick makers in the area. Richard Maxted worked for Titley & Frost, the brickmaker closest to McRoberts. It was just on the other side of the railroad tracks, at St. Clair, west of Campbell Avenue (now Prescott).


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Nice Hunt!!! Cool old place!! Congrats !!!
Great info too😁
 

Digger RJ

Gold Member
Aug 24, 2017
15,812
27,567
SW Missouri/Oklahoma
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
2
Detector(s) used
Minelab CTX 3030; Minelab Equinox 800;
XP Deus 2
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Thanks for your post Randy. :icon_thumright:
Hope things are starting to cool down in your area.
Dave
Back in the 90’s🙄 I was hopeful Fall temps were already here. Won’t stop Me though!
Headed out tomorrow 😁
 
OP
ANTIQUARIAN

ANTIQUARIAN

Gold Member
Apr 24, 2010
12,698
26,996
Upper Canada 🇨🇦
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
3
Detector(s) used
XP Deus, Lesche Piranha 35 Shovel & 'Garrett Carrot'
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #7
Thanks very much for your support here guys. :occasion14:

A large number of our mid-19thc houses are simply left to rot exposed to the elements here in Ontario by land developers. This is mainly due to my provinces extremely weak Ontario Heritage Act.

The biggest shortcoming of the Ontario Heritage Act is the lack of 'teeth'. From the start the Act was criticized as weak, giving Ontario municipalities the power to delay demolition of heritage buildings for 180 days but not to stop it. These standards and guidelines were prepared in consultation with ministries and affected public bodies. They set out the criteria and process for identifying provincial heritage properties and the standards for their protection, maintenance, use and disposal. The current standards and guidelines require all ministries and prescribed public bodies to identify, protect and care for provincial heritage properties they own or manage. Over the past 30 years, Canada has lost 23 percent of its historic building stock in urban areas and 21 percent in rural areas. This rate of destruction is disturbing both in terms of lost heritage and increased environmental waste.

For those who may be interested, here’s a link to a site that identifies Canada’s ‘Worst Losses Archive’ of buildings/sites that have been demolished in the name of progress.


I need to keep an eye on this site, so I'm going to drive by it again today on my way into Toronto. As we all know, once the big machinery moves onto these properties, the soil conditions change quickly. I may take another run at it again on Sunday before the history here is lost forever.
Dave
 

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