Old finds 2

sandchip

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Never really could come up with a classification for this whatzit. First thought was an adze, but that doesn't really fit, nor does anything in the conventional sense. From a south Georgia site that produced Paleo thru Archaic artifacts including numerous Clovis and Dalton points. Maybe one of you can figure it out.
 

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sandchip

sandchip

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More angles.
 

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ToddsPoint

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It looks like a large preform that failed because of the bad inclusions. Around here we call those spoiled knives. Gary
 

Quartzite Keith

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That looks very similar to an artifact commonly found at the Williamson Clovis site (et al) here in Virginia. Dr. McCoy, who did the excavation there, called them "chisel wedges". The key it that thick, flat, heavily battered end where (in theory any way) it was beat on to drive the blade end into wood or bone to split or chisel it.
 
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sandchip

sandchip

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That looks very similar to an artifact commonly found at the Williamson Clovis site (et al) here in Virginia. Dr. McCoy, who did the excavation there, called them "chisel wedges". The key it that thick, flat, heavily battered end where (in theory any way) it was beat on to drive the blade end into wood or bone to split or chisel it.

That's what caught my eye, as if a maul or mallet was used to drive it into wood, but once again, I dunno.

Thanks, everybody for your thoughts and input.
 

uniface

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Chisel Wedges: AKA pieces esquilles.

If so, absence of step fracturing @ working edge would indicate use on something soft, like wood.

FWIW
 
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sandchip

sandchip

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I apologize for not showing better pictures of the working edge. Maybe these will help.
 

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sandchip

sandchip

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And one more at home with my favorite adze.
 

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