🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Old Rusty Hand Forged Blade. Non Symmetrical Axe Head.

USNFLYR

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I found a contorted blade in shallow water where a wharf use to be. The site was once used to get quarried rocks and salmon down river. At first it looked like this was an axe head that was severely mangled. But after cleaning it up, it now appears that it was forged and used as a "wedge"? One side (the upper) appears to sloop upwards. The backside looks to have been hammered upon. Complicating my theories is the fact that while cleaning, I found remnants of wood from where a handle was inserted. I have a hard time imagining a wooden handle being used in "tree chopping" or timber clearing. Either way, I will apply a layer of Gempler's and save it….. (I may be wrong on wedge vs blade ….. and maybe the "eye" and back side hammer surface was merely bent through usage)….. I guess I’m reaching out for a sanity check. Do axes fail? Can they become this mangled?



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not symmetric in design?
 
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Tesorodeoro

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I found a contorted blade in shallow water where a wharf use to be. The site was once used to get quarried rocks and salmon down river. At first it looked like this was an axe head that was severely mangled. But after cleaning it up, it now appears that it was forged and used as a "wedge"? One side (the upper) appears to sloop upwards. The backside looks to have been hammered upon. Complicating my theories is the fact that while cleaning, I found remnants of wood from where a handle was inserted. I have a hard time imagining a wooden handle being used in "tree chopping" or timber clearing. Either way, I will apply a layer of Gempler's and save it….. (I may be wrong on wedge vs blade ….. and maybe the "eye" and back side hammer surface was merely bent through usage)….. I guess I’m reaching out for a sanity check. Do axes fail? Can they become this mangled?



View attachment 2048228 View attachment 2048229 View attachment 2048230 View attachment 2048231 View attachment 2048232 View attachment 2048233 not symmetric in design?
Thats not by design. That’s the result of tool abuse. Someone used an axe head as a splitting wedge (minus the handle) until it failed as you see it now.
 
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USNFLYR

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Thats not by design. That’s the result of tool abuse. Someone used an axe head as a splitting wedge (minus the handle) until it failed as you see it now.
Thanks... it definitely got abused!
 
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releventchair

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Thanks... it definitely got abused!
Them old iron head are malleable.
Yours like many looks to have an intact bit /blade edge due to containing harder steel.
Steel being more precious , it was used sparingly.

It was wailed on for sure. But once damaged , why stop now if it still splits wood when held by the handle and struck again on the poll? L.o.l.. Use it up and get your moneys worth.
 
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USNFLYR

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I'm probably wrong, but with the hole for the handle at a right angle to the bit, it looks like a froe.
Interesting. I never knew what a froe was. Looked up antique froes. That theory remains viable too. Thanks
 
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eyemustdigtreasure

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I found a contorted blade in shallow water where a wharf use to be. The site was once used to get quarried rocks and salmon down river. At first it looked like this was an axe head that was severely mangled. But after cleaning it up, it now appears that it was forged and used as a "wedge"? One side (the upper) appears to sloop upwards. The backside looks to have been hammered upon. Complicating my theories is the fact that while cleaning, I found remnants of wood from where a handle was inserted. I have a hard time imagining a wooden handle being used in "tree chopping" or timber clearing. Either way, I will apply a layer of Gempler's and save it….. (I may be wrong on wedge vs blade ….. and maybe the "eye" and back side hammer surface was merely bent through usage)….. I guess I’m reaching out for a sanity check. Do axes fail? Can they become this mangled?



View attachment 2048228 View attachment 2048229 View attachment 2048230 View attachment 2048231 View attachment 2048232 View attachment 2048233 not symmetric in design?
Hand-forged modified for chopping/shaping wooden beams - you stood on opposite side of your work...
Better quality job, plus safer for the worker.... Real "Home-made" structures...
 
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Tesorodeoro

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Hand-forged modified for chopping/shaping wooden beams - you stood on opposite side of your work...
Better quality job, plus safer for the worker.... Real "Home-made" structures...
Take a look at the oblong handle hole and envision how you would hold it in you hand and swing. Seems the cutting edge is the wrong angle..and it’s a very heavy maul. Be pretty difficult to use the maul end the way it’s on the side. What do you think? I’ve seen a bend put in axe handles for offset work, but never for a heavy maul. Usually the bit is parallel to the wide axis of the handle.
 
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USNFLYR

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Hand-forged modified for chopping/shaping wooden beams - you stood on opposite side of your work...
Better quality job, plus safer for the worker.... Real "Home-made" structures...
Wow. Thanks for weighing in. I think the shape would not be so parallel after bending the eye through "abuse". Plus wood filament is still in the eye. It does look like it was forged that way….
 
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Tony in SC

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Thats not by design. That’s the result of tool abuse. Someone used an axe head as a splitting wedge (minus the handle) until it failed as you see it now.
It has been used as a wedge causing the eye to bend. I have done that myself.
 
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releventchair

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Froe blade?
You all are confusing froes with broad axes/ broad hatches. Froes have long thin blades used to split shingles, the blade is not offset with the eye. Broad axes/ hatchets have an offset blade from the eye.
Might as well toss adzes into the mix for a different angle on the blade too.
For finish work after a broad axe (some with curved handles to avoid bonking the timber with knuckles) was used to hew to the line creating a squared edge.
That edge being vulnerable to the proposed offset tool created by abuse ( and or desperate necessity) to work offside of timber from users position. Excepting perhaps a pole sized timber. Which other tools could reduce. But for what?
 
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Tesorodeoro

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Can you provide a picture of another example that’s in better shape? I’m confused with the bit being perpendicular to the strong axis of the handle.
 

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