Place Names in and around the USGS Leadville Map

BuffaloBob

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Leadville has a long history of mining and populations. There are still places to search around there if you know where to start. This is long list but may be helpful to some T-Netters.
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~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Place Place Names in the Leadville Quadrangle

(Because of the scale of the main map and figure 2, not all of the nearly 600 place names listed below could be shown. Approximate date of founding is shown for some place names. Some place names have older alternate names shown in parentheses. P.O. = Post Office; year following "P.O." indicates date of establishment of Post Office.)
Adelaide, P.O., 1878, formerly Park City, SE 1/4 sec.19, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., on Stray Horse Gulch, had a smelter. Lake County
Agassiz, a name given to a site where there was only 1 house, location in the SE 1/4 sec. 24, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., later to be the site of Leadville. Agassiz was first proposed as the future site of the St. Louis Smelting and Refining Company; a corporation was formed, called "Agassiz Town Company," in the spring of 1877. They applied for a Post Office, but after some discussion the name Leadville was adopted for that area, rather than Agassiz (Griswold and Griswold, 1996, p. 148). Lake County
Alexander, NW 1/4 SE 1/4 sec. 13, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., on Little Evans Gulch. Lake County
Alexander, 1878–1884, SE 1/4 sec. 13, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., along the East Fork of the Arkansas River on U.S. Highway 24 northwest of Leadville near the Red Cliff Wagon Road. Lake County
Alicante (Summit), P.O., 1881, SE 1/4 sec. 11, T. 8 S., R. 79 W. The John Reed mine near Alicante was noted for fine rhodochrosite crystals (Eberhart, 1959, p. 205–206). The D. & R.G. R.R. station was called Summit because it was high on Fremont Pass and near Climax. Had a 2,000–foot tramway and a 20–foot stamp mill, abandoned by 1888. Lake County
Allen, 1881, center sec. 15, T. 5 S., R. 87 W., a siding on the D. & R.G. R.R., near Spruce Creek and French Gulch. Garfield County
Allens, 1881, probably in the east 1/2 of sec. 27, T. 7 S., R. 80 W., a station along the D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Allenton, SE 1/4 sec. 36, T. 4 S., R. 83 W., D. & R.G. R.R. name for Edwards on the Berry's Ranch, formerly Wilmore, used Post Office at Edwards. Eagle County
Alma, settled 1872, P.O., 1873, NW 1/4 sec. 12, T. 9 S., R. 78 W., a mining camp with a smelter. Park County
Alma Junction, NW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 9 S., R. 77 W. Park County
Alma Smelter, NW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 9 S., R. 78 W. Park County
Alma Station (London Junction, London), on D.S.P & P. R.R. in the NW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 9 S., R. 77 W. Park County
Amity, NE 1/4 sec. 1, T. 9 S., R. 81 W., a mining camp near St. Kevin's. Lake County
Antlers, P.O., 1891, NE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 6 S., R. 93 W., on D. & R.G. R.R. near Ives Station west of Silt on Colorado River. Garfield County
Anvil Points, NE 1/4 sec. 19, T. 6 S., R. 94 W., a U.S. Bureau of Mines oil shale research plant. Garfield County
Apex, in Leadville area, later in St. Kevins Mining District, NW 1/4 sec. 10, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Arbany Spur, NE 1/4 sec. 18, T. 8 S., R. 86 W., on a tributary of Roaring Fork. Pitkin County
Argentine (formerly Conger), P.O., 1881, NE 1/4 sec. 17, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., a railroad stop near Bacon on the D.S.P. & P. Ry. Summit County
Arkansas Junction, P.O., 1890, SE 1/4 sec. 20, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., a railroad junction due west of Leadville. Lake County
Ashcroft (Castle Forks City), P.O., 1880, NW 1/4 sec. 32, T. 11 S., R. 84 W., a silver and lead mining place, Horace A.W. Tabor lived here temporarily, a busy mining town. It was once a stop for three stage lines. Originally it was accessible only by way of Taylor Pass, which was closed in the winter and always difficult to cross. To go over the pass, stages and wagons had to disassemble their vehicles and bring them down or up across cliffs as high as 40 feet. Before Independence Pass was opened, stage and wagon traffic went across Cottonwood Pass west of Buena Vista, but two stage lines still went over Taylor Pass and a third over Pearl Pass. When the D. & R.G. R.R. finally reached Aspen, access from the north was gained to Ashcroft. Also, Independence Pass was opened and improved access from Leadville with a shorter trip than thru Aspen. Because of the richer mines in Aspen and the arrival of the D. & R.G. R.R. in Aspen, after 1887 Ashcroft began to die out. In later years, Ashcroft had begun a comeback as a tourist attraction and now is a resort. Pitkin County
Aspen (Roaring Fork City, Ute City), 1879, P.O., 1880, sec. 7, T. 10 S., R. 84 W. During the early years, housing was hard to come by and conditions were somewhat primitive. In Frank Wentworth's book, "Aspen on the Roaring Fork" (1950), is the following quote: "The Clergymen, March 21, 1885. Aspen now has four clergymen, Catholic, Congregational, Episcopal and Methodist. A Baptist should also come. He would do an immense amount of good if he could succeed in converting many owing to the fact there are hundreds of people here who have not taken a bath in four years." In 1893, Aspen was considered to be the richest silver–producing community in the world. In 1894, the Smuggler mine produced the then largest silver nugget in the world that weighed 2,054 pounds, and it was more than 93 percent silver. Aspen was settled later than many other areas primarily because of the hazard from Indians. By 1880, the fear of Indians decreased, more miners arrived, and more mines were opened. In 1881, three stage lines came from Crested Butte; two over Taylor Pass and one over Pearl Pass. Aspen really grew when the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad arrived in 1887. In February 1888, the Colorado Midland Railway came into town, and in that year Aspen became the first city in Colorado to have electric lights. The cost of shipping ore fell from $50 to $100 per ton by wagon to $10 to $15 per ton by railroad. The railroads were the most important influence in the growth of Aspen. Aspen rose rapidly in importance until the drastic collapse of silver prices in 1893. Then, as in all the big silver mining towns, business went into a serious slump. However, in addition to being one of the world's greatest metal mining towns, Aspen also was a fertile farming and ranching area. In later years, it has become one of Colorado's major ski areas and a popular cultural and recreational center. Pitkin County
Aspen Junction, P.O., 1890, SE 1/4 sec. 7, T. 8 S., R. 86 W. (See Basalt). Eagle County
Astor City (Blaine), 1880s, NW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., a temporary camp 6 miles north of Red Cliff on Kelly's Toll Road, on western slope of Battle Mountain, formerly the site of the trading post of the Astor Fur Trading Company (Eberhart, 1959, p. 180). Eagle County
Avalanche (Hot Springs), SW 1/4 sec. 33, T. 9 S., R. 88 W., a small community south of Janeway on the Crystal River Railway. Pitkin County
Avon Siding, P.O., 1900, SE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 5 S., R. 82 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Azure, NW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 1 S., R. 81 W., a stop on the Denver & Salt Lake Railroad before 1923. Grand County
Bacon Station, SE 1/4 sec. 8, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., on the D.S.P. & P. Railway on Boreas Pass route, station below Bakers Tank. Summit County
Bakers Tank, NW 1/4 sec. 16, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., an important stop on Boreas Pass line. Has a long–standing water tank. Summit County
Balltown, center SE 1/4 sec. 24, T. 11 S., R. 80 W. (on Twin Lakes Spur of Colorado Midland Railway), mail was sent to Granite. Lake County
Balzac, P.O., 1891, SW 1/4 sec. 31, T. 6 S., R. 94 W., 1 mile southeast of Rulison. Garfield County
Bar H Park, NE 1/4 sec. 18, T. 3 S., R. 92 W. Garfield County
Barlow, P.O., 1883, NE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 89 W. Garfield County
Bartholomew, NW 1/4 sec. 30, T. 6 S., R. 77 W., railroad station on the D.S.P & P. R.R. Summit County
Basalt (Frying Pan City, Aspen Junction), P.O., 1895, SE 1/4 sec. 7, T. 8 S., R. 86 W. Eagle County
Bates, NW corner sec. 15, T. 9 S., R. 85 W., D. & R.G. R.R. station. Pitkin County
Battle Mountain Park, SW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 6 S., R. 80 W., one–third mile north of Redcliff near Rex; named for a historic battle in 1849 between the Ute and Arapaho Tribes. Eagle County
Beaver City, 1880, SW 1/4 sec. 9, T. 12 S., R. 80 W., on Clear Creek. Chaffee County
Beckers, SW 1/4 sec. 3, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., on Cardiff Gulch Branch of Colorado Midland Railway. Garfield County
Belden, 1879, NW 1/4 sec. 13, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., D. & R.G. R.R. station. Eagle County
Bells Camp (Cleveland), 1880, P.O., 1883, NE 1/4 sec. 24, T. 6 S., R. 81 W. Eagle County
Bensons, NW 1/4 sec. 5, T. 7 S., R. 78 W., D. & R.G. station south of Wheeler. Summit County
Bernard, P.O., 1896, SW 1/4 sec. 22, T. 10 S., R. 95 W., a small settlement on Grand Mesa in Mesa County
Berrys Ranch (see Edwards), SE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 5 S., R. 82 W. Eagle County
Bighorn, SE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 5 S., R. 80 W. Eagle County
Biglow (Quinns Spur), NE 1/4 sec. 21, T. 8 S., R. 83 W., Quinns spur was a railroad spur 1 mile northwest of Norrie, later Biglow, a loading spur for lumber near Massive City. Pitkin County
Birdseye, 1879, SW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., named for the local porphyritic rock at junction of Birdseye Gulch and East Fork of Arkansas River, on the D. & R.G. Ry. and D.S.P. & P. Ry. southwest of Wortman; the Birdseye site is now on the L.C. & S. Lake County
Birdseye Station, on L.C. & S. R.R., northwest corner sec. 4, T. 9 S., R. 79 W. Lake County
Black Iron Station, NE 1/4 sec. 24, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., D. & R.G. R.R. station just north of Red Cliff. Eagle County
Blaine, P.O., 1884, NE 1/4 sec. 2, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., formerly Astor City in the SW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., 3.5 miles from Red Cliff where road from Cleveland crosses Rock Creek. Eagle County
Blake City, NE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., 2 miles downstream from mouth of Eagle River, had a ferry. Eagle County
Blue Hill, NW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 5 S., R. 86 W. Eagle County
Blue River, 1964, NW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., 3.5 miles south of Breckenridge. Summit County
Boiling Springs (see Glenwood Springs). Garfield County
Bond, P.O., 1935, SE 1/4 sec. 16, or NE 1/4 sec. 21, T. 2 S., R. 83 W., D. & S.L. Ry. station (see Orestod), 1860–1870(?). Eagle County
Bond, P.O., 1886, SE 1/4 sec. 14, T. 9 S., R. 81 W. Lake County
Boston, middle sec. 30, T. 7 S., R. 78 W., in Mayflower Gulch off Upper Ten Mile Canyon. Summit County
Boughtown, 1860–1872, NW corner sec. 25, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., the unofficial name of the overall settlement scattered in a most disorderly manner for about 6 miles up and down both sides of California Gulch. Also a short–lived camp near the SE corner of future site of Leadville, in the NW 1/4 sec. 25, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., named for the boughs of all the trees that formerly grew there and for the small miner's brush shelters that were constructed of four poles covered on the tops and sides by evergreen boughs. Later called Oro City. The last miners there tore down a gambling house and panned two thousand dollars in gold dust from beneath its floor. Lake County
Braddock, P.O., 1884, (Broncho Dave Braddock's ranch), SW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 6 S., R. 77 W. (see Broncho Station), formerly Preston, 1878, on Leadville Line of D.L. & G. Ry. (C. & S. Ry), 3 miles north of Breckenridge; somehow Braddock managed to grow vegetables in the Blue River's cool alpine soil (average growing season is 12 days). Summit County
Breckenridge, 1859, P.O., 1860, SW 1/4 sec. 31, T. 6 S., R. 77 W. The first prospectors in the Blue River valley built a fort (Fort Meribeh or Fort Mary B.) as protection from the Ute Indians; the area of the fort later became a part of Breckenridge. The first stagecoach entered the town in 1860. Breckenridge was one of the richest gold mining areas in Colorado. In the early years it was a gold placer mining camp. By 1863, miners had worked most of the shallow gravel deposits in the valleys, removing the placer gold using sluice boxes, rockers, and gold pans. Eventually, hard–rock lode mines were located and worked. For example, rich gold veins were discovered on Farncomb Hill. In 1907, giant dredges started operating in most of the valleys, earning as much as $20,000 worth of gold per week. The dredges could work large areas of gravel that were too deep or unprofitable to work by other methods. After the dredging was stopped, the dredges were salvaged for the World War II scrap iron drive. In the early years of the United States during the purchase of land in the western United States, a 1,300–square–mile area from Breckenridge north to Grand Lake was not officially entered as a part of the U.S.A. The omission was discovered in 1936 by a Breckenridge women's club member and was corrected by Colorado Governor Ed Johnson. Summit County
Breen, NW 1/4 sec. 24, T. 7 S., R. 79 W. Summit County
Brickyard Spur, SE 1/4 sec. 27, T. 7 S., R. 88 W. Garfield County
Broncho Station, 1885, SW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 6 S., R. 77 W., same as Braddock and same as Sultana(?). Summit County
Brooklyn Heights, just south of Leadville, probably on the rise in the NE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Brumley (Bromley) (Wolle, 1977), SW 1/4 sec. 15, T. 11 S., R. 82 W., an important stage stop on North Fork Lake Creek and Hunter Pass Road and on Lake Creek southeast of Independence Pass. Had a 3–mile–long aerial tram to take the ore for treatment. Lake County
Bryant Station (Sands), pre–1923, Colorado Midland station in the NE 1/4 sec. 29, T. 7 S., R. 88 W. Garfield County
Buckskin, 1860, P.O., 1866, earlier called Laurette P.O. in 1865, SE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 9 S., R. 78 W., in 1863 named Buckskin Joe. H.A.W. Tabor moved there, started a grocery store, and also worked a claim. The Phillips Lode was the most productive mine, yielding $500,000 in 1861 and 1862. An old Spanish arrastra (a circular stone mill for grinding gold–bearing rock) is nearby along Buckskin Creek. Park County
Buckskin Joe, County Seat 1863–1866, SE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 9 S., R. 78 W., station of the Dan McLaughlin Stage Line that took passengers and freight to Denver. Park County
Bucktown, 1879, on line between NW 1/4, sec. 34 and SW 1/4 sec. 27, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., mining camp close to Stringtown, but east of Malta. Lake County
Buffers Spur, 1917, NW 1/4 sec. 2, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., name of railroad station was Buffehr, 1 mile north of Robinson and 4 miles south of Kokomo. Summit County
Buford, P.O., 1890, NW 1/4 sec. 9, T. 1 S., R. 91 W., on White River. Rio Blanco County
Burns Hole, P.O., 1895(?), SW 1/4 sec. 9, T. 2 S., R. 85 W., on Cabin Creek a little more than 2 miles northwest of the Colorado River. Eagle County
Burns Station, P.O., 1895, NW 1/4 sec. 23, T. 2 S., R. 85 W., station at Sunnyside Creek along the Colorado River on the D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Busk, P.O., 1890, SW 1/4 sec. 20, T. 9 S., R. 81 W., a settlement at the southeast mouth of Busk–Ivanhoe Tunnel, a station on the Colorado Midland Railway, near Crawford Log Spur (figure 3). Lake County
Busk–Ivanhoe Tunnel, sec. 19, T. 9 S., R. 81 W., a 2–mile–long tunnel completed December 1893 about 500 feet below the Hagerman Pass Tunnel. After 1921 a toll gate ($1.00 fare) was built for autos to go through the tunnel, which was then called the Carlton Tunnel for the man who bought it from the railroad. Lake County
Cache Creek, 1860, P.O., 1862, SW 1/4 sec. 2, T. 12 S., R. 80 W., mining camp in 1860 that was 3 miles north of the 39th parallel. Other camps near Cache Creek were Bertschey's Gulch, Gibson Gulch, Gold Run, Lake Creek, Oregon Creek, and Ritchies Patch. Chaffee County
Cactus Valley, T. 6 S., R. 92 and 93 W., along the Colorado River. Garfield County
Calcium, P.O., 1888, SE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 8 S., R. 84 W., a limestone quarry area renamed Thomasville. Pitkin County
California Gulch (Carson), sec. 25 and 26, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., and sec. 30, T. 9 S., R. 79 W. The first gold placer strikes in the Leadville area were made along California Gulch. Emmons and others (1927) said that the gulch was almost abandoned in 1865; however, some activity continued through 1875 on both placers and lodes. California Gulch was divided into three districts (see Leadville and vicinity map, figure 4): (1) Arkansas Independent District at west end of the valley, 82 claims, 8,200 feet of valley bottom, (2) Sacramento District in the middle, 190 claims, 19,000 feet of valley bottom, and (3) California District, the east end of the valley, 67 claims, 6,700 feet of valley bottom; the three equaled a total of 33,900 feet of placer–rich available valley bottom. Average width of the gulch was 100 feet. In January 1867, the three parts were consolidated into the "California Mining District." Bank claims (placer pits in sloping banks) were situated along the sides of California Gulch—some claims yielded gold, others did not. Because the amount of flowing water became inadequate to extract gold after the 1860s, a large flume 12 miles long was constructed from 1870 to 1875. The gulch during that time was characterized by a row of dismantled miner's hamlets. Lake County
Camp Bryan, 1920(?), center sec. 30, T. 7 S., R. 80 W. Eagle County
Camp Fancy, 1880, SW 1/4 sec. 30, T. 7 S., R. 81 W., settlement on Fancy Creek. Apparently more money was spent on mining than was recovered from the minerals mined. Eagle County
Camp Fulford, 1887, NE 1/4 sec. 23 or NW 1/4 sec. 24, T. 6 S., R. 83 W., a gold camp, earlier known as Nolan's Creek Mining Camp. Eagle County
Camp Hale Military Reservation, sections 15, 22, and 23, T. 7 S., R. 80 W. (Active from 1942 to 1965.) In March 1942, Leadville was informed by the U.S. Army that a major military camp was going to be built along the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad at Pando, about 7 miles north of Tennessee Pass. The camp was planned to house and train more than 15,000 soldiers and support personnel of a newly established Tenth Mountain Division. They were to be trained in mountain and winter warfare. Construction of Camp Hale was completed in November 1942, and the soldiers began to move there before Christmas 1942. The camp lay at 9,300 feet altitude and was a cold place all winter. The valley trapped cold air and smog which caused a cold–air and smoke–induced cough among all residents. During WWII, German Prisoners of War were housed at the camp for some time. The Division soldiers spent most of three winters in the camp, then were shipped to Camp Swift in Texas in July 1944 for flat–land training. They were shipped to Italy in early 1945. Their bravery, their combat record in their winter warfare specialty, and their devotion to duty reveal a tradition that Colorado and all of America is proud of. During the Korean War, the camp was again used to train soldiers for duty in Korea. In the early 1960s, the CIA used the camp to train Tibetan guerillas. As a result of all the military maneuvers and the use of munitions, the camp still contains scattered shrapnel, spent shells, and undetonated explosive devices. Camp Hale was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 10, 1992. Eagle County
Camp Harrington, 1900(?), NE 1/4 sec. 15, T. 8 S., R. 80 W., near Tennessee Pass. Miners camp, earlier called Tennessee Pass or Cooper, now is site of Cooper Hill Ski Area. Lake County
Camp McIntire, NE 1/4 sec. 23, T. 9 S., R. 80 W.(?), a temporary camp just west of Harrison Avenue and north of 13th Street in the north end of Leadville established by the National Guard soldiers during the 1896–1897 miner's strike (Blair, 1980). Lake County
Carbonate, 1878, P.O., 1883, the first Post Office in Garfield County, middle of south 1/2 section 35, T. 3 S., R. 89 W., called Carbonate City, up on the Flat Tops at 11,313 feet altitude, about 13 miles north of Glenwood Springs, a camp with low–grade silver ore, the only mining camp known in the Flat Tops (see post road number 30). A stage from Red Cliff arrived 3 times a week by way of Dotsero on the Coffee Pot Road to Carbonate and Gresham (Murray and Lee, 1978, p. 72). Garfield County Seat for four months in 1883, but became a ghost town at end of 1883 (Urquhart, 1967, p. 12). Garfield County
Carbonate Camp, a popular name for Leadville in the 1870s. Lake County
Carbonateville, 1878, P.O., 1879, a mining camp south of Robinson at the mouth of McNulty Gulch and north of Fremont Pass in the NE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., near Climax, abandoned by 1881. Just east was McNulty Gulch, a rich placer mining camp; the name had earlier been proposed but rejected as a name for Leadville. Summit County
Carbondale, 1883, P.O., 1887, SW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 7 S., R. 88 W., a Colorado Midland Railway or D. & R.G. station along the Crystal River. Garfield County
Cardiff, P.O., 1889, SW 1/4 sec. 22, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., a coal and coke camp and a station of the Colorado Midland Railway. Garfield County
Careys Camp, 1882, P.O., 1883, SW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 11 S., R. 85 W., a settlement along Conundrum Creek 7 miles south of Highland, avalanche–prone area, located at Conundrum Hot Springs. Pitkin County
Castle, P.O., 1885, NW 1/4 sec. 6, T. 5 S., R. 84 W., name changed to Eagle in 1891, a tent city south of Eagle River in Eagle County
Castle Forks (Chloride, P.O., 1881), SE 1/4 sec. 7, T. 12 S., R. 84 W., an isolated mining camp 8 miles south of Highland City that later changed its name to Ashcroft. Pitkin County
Castles Station, NE 1/4 sec. 11, T. 8 S., R. 86 W., on the route of the Colorado Midland along the Frying Pan River. Eagle County
Castner, 1928, T. 8 S., R. 86 W.(?), east of Basalt on the Frying Pan River. Eagle County
Catherine, P.O., 1892, SE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 7 S., R. 88 W., a D. & R.G. R.R. station east of Carbondale. Garfield County
Cattle Creek Station, SW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 7 S., R. 88 W., about 9 miles southeast of Glenwood Springs. Garfield County
Cerussite (a mineral name), an early proposed name for the Leadville City area; however, it was vetoed. Lake County
Chacra, center sec. 34, T. 5 S., R. 90 W., along the Colorado River. Garfield County
Chacra Siding, NE 1/4 sec. 35, T. 5 S., R. 90 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. Garfield County
Chalk Creek Ranch, 1879(?), T. 8 S., R. 79 W., a ranching area near Tabor City, Halfway House, and Taylor City. Lake County
Chalk Ranch, SE 1/4 sec. 16, T. 8 S., R. 79 W. Lake County
Chapman, P.O., 1884, SW 1/4 sec. 6, T. 6 S., R. 91 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. Garfield County
Charcoal, 1879(?), NE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 6 S., R. 78 W., a station on the C. & S. Ry. between Frisco and Dickey. Summit County
Chicken Hill, near California Gulch. A southwestern spur of Carbonate Hill was named for Chicken Bill (William H. Lovell). Location uncertain. Lake County
Chipeta (Chepeta), SE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 11 S., R. 83 W., an alternate name of Independence, which had a Post Office. According to Wolle (1974), Chipeta also was called Mammoth City, Monmouth, Mount Hope, and Farwell. On the Roaring Fork River. Pitkin County
Chloride, P.O., 1881, SE 1/4 sec. 7, T. 12 S., R. 84 W. (see Coopers Camp and Castle Forks). Pitkin County
Chloride, 1860, SW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., a mining camp just south of Conger. Summit County
Cleator Moor, an early name for Finntown, on Cleator Moor Gulch in the SW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 9 S., R. 79 W. Lake County
Cleveland (Bells Camp), 1880, P.O., 1883, NE 1/4 sec. 24, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., a mining and lumber camp on Eagle River 2 miles northwest of Redcliff. Eagle County
Clifton (1880), SE 1/4 sec. 23, T. 9 S., R. 81 W., a mining camp on Sugar Loaf Mountain 2.5 miles northwest of Soda Springs. Lake County
Climax, P.O., 1887, NE 1/4 sec. 11, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., on summit of Fremont Pass, at one time the highest railroad station and Post Office in the United States. The valuable element molybdenum was identified here in 1900, and during WWI and WWII the mine became one of the greatest producers of molybdenum in the United States. Lake County
Cloud City, an early popular name for Leadville
Clover, 1897, NW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 9 S., R. 94 W. Mesa County
Coal Basin, 1881–1882, P.O., 1901, NE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 10 S., R. 89 W., Colorado Fuel & Iron Company operated coal mines in the area; a company town on the Crystal River Railroad spur built 1900; mines closed 1909. Pitkin County
Coalridge, P.O., 1889, SE 1/4 sec. 35, T. 5 S., R. 90 W. Garfield County
Coffee Pot Springs NE 1/4 sec. 25, T. 4 S., R. 88 W., near French Creek, a stop on wagon road from Carbonate to Dotsero. Garfield County
Collbran, P.O., 1892, NE 1/4 sec. 35, T. 9 S., R. 95 W., along Plateau Creek. Mesa County
Colorado, NW 1/4 sec. 14, T. 8 S., R. 84 W. Pitkin County
Colorow, P.O., 1882, NW 1/4 sec. 16, T. 1 S., R. 80 W., about 7 miles southeast of Kremmling, named for White River Ute Indian Chief Colorow. Grand County
Concentrator Station, SE 1/4 sec. 35, T. 9 S., R. 85 W., railroad stop about 4 miles northwest of Aspen. Pitkin County
Conger, 1879, P.O., 1880 (later Argentine), NE 1/4 sec. 17, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., a short–lived mining and lumbering camp along Hoosier Pass road and along the Blue River 3 miles south of Breckenridge. Summit County
Cooper, P.O., 1891, NE 1/4 sec. 10, T. 8 S., R. 80 W., a mining camp (Tennessee Pass), now Cooper Hill ski area. Eagle County
Coopers Camp, 1880s (Wolle, 1977, p. 186), SE 1/4 sec. 7, T. 12 S., R. 84 W., an area of iron mines near Ashcroft, sold to the C.F. & I. in 1886. The ore was shipped to Aspen, but the mining died out about 1887 (see Highland). Pitkin County
Copper Spur, P.O., 1929, SE 1/4 sec. 4, T. 2 S., R. 83 W. Eagle County
Corkscrew District, placer prospect near Breckenridge, Township 6 or 7 South, Range 77 or 78 West. Summit County
Coronado, 1880s, NW 1/4 sec. 12, T. 6 S., R. 81 W. (location?). Silver camp near Battle Mountain along the Eagle River. Eagle County
Coryell Coal Spur, NW 1/4 sec. 2, T. 6 S., R. 91 W. Garfield County
Crane Park, NW 1/4 sec. 22, T. 8 S., R. 80 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. Lake County
Crater Station (Pershing), NW 1/4 sec. 16, T. 1 S., R. 83 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. Routt County
Cravens, SW l/4 sec. 2, T. 8 S., R. 79 W. Summit County
Crawford Log Spur, NW 1/4 sec. 21, T. 9 S., R. 81 W. Lake County
Cruperton, NW1/4 sec. 19, T. 7 S., R. 87 W. Eagle County
Crystal City (Rock Creek District), P.O., 1882, NW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 11 S., R. 87 W., a big silver camp, now accessible by four–wheel drive in the summer. On the road from Marble to Crystal City the Sheep Mountain tunnel mill west of Crystal City is a most photographic sight. Gunnison County
Crystal Lake, SE 1/4 sec. 9, T. 10 S., R. 80 W., a small resort along the railroad and the Arkansas River. Lake County
Crystal Ranch, NW 1/4 sec. 29, T. 10 S., R. 88 W., halfway between Placita and Redstone along the Crystal River. Pitkin County
Crystal River Ranch, SE 1/4 sec. 31, T. 7 S., R. 88 W., south of Sopris. Garfield County
Cunningham, NW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 5 S., R. 78 W. Summit County
Curtin, NW 1/4 sec. 8, T. 6 S., R. 78 W., a stop on the D.S.P. & P. R.R. south of Frisco. Summit County
Dana (see Hayden and Kobe), NE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., at Granite along the Arkansas River. Lake County
Davies, P.O., 1894, sec. 27, T. 8 S., R. 86 W. Pitkin County
Dayton, early 1860s, P.O., 1866, NW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., at northwest edge of a small mining camp, near Twin Lakes, county seat from 1866 to 1868, at southeastern foot of Mount Elbert. There was a 16–mile–long toll road from Dayton to Oro City near Leadville. The Chaffee County Seat later was moved to Granite. Lake County
Deen Station, 1860, NW corner sec. 22, T. 7 S., R. 80 W., along the D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Defiance, 1879, secs. 9 and 10, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., early name of Glenwood Springs. Garfield County
Defiance City, SE 1/4 sec. 25, T. 5 S., R. 88 W. Garfield County
Defiance Mineral Claim, SE 1/4 sec. 23, T. 5 S., R. 88 W. Garfield County
Delaware Flats Community, 1859, P.O., 1861 (Delaware City), NW 1/4 sec. 17, T. 6 S., R 77 W., where Gold Run Gulch joins the Swan River, now partly dredged. Summit County
Dell, sec. 18, T. 2 S., R. 84 W., a station on the Dotsero Cut–off. Eagle County
Derby Junction, middle sec. 22, T. 2 S., R. 85 W. Eagle County
Devereaux, P.O., 1883, NE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 89 W. Garfield County
Devils Punchbowl, SE 1/4 sec. 1, T. 11 S., R. 84 W. Pitkin County
Dickey, P.O., 1892, formerly Placer Junction, NE 1/4 sec. 31, T. 5 S., R. 77 W., at the junction of the Breckenridge, Leadville, and Keystone branches of the D.S.P. & P. R.R.; had a three–stall roundhouse and a coaling station (Gilliland, 1987, p. 212), a 47,500 gallon water tank, a pump house, and a large wye with 47,383 feet of side track, now covered by Dillon Reservoir. Summit County
Dickey Station, P.O., 1892, center north 1/2 sec. 31, T. 5 S., R. 77 W., a railroad coaling and switching station on the Colorado and Southern Railway. Summit County
Dillon (Junction City), P.O., 1879, SW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 5 S., R. 77 W., originally called Bonte's Hole for a French Canadian trapper. Dillon was founded in 1873 by four men at the foot of a small mesa where later stood a cemetery. Site of the New Dillon Placer. The most permanent site was established in 1879 (Junction City) on Keystone branch of D.S.P & P. R.R., and in 1882 became site of the D. & R.G. R.R. station. There was a wye on the track near the site of the original Dillon. Summit County
Dillon, 1970, SE 1/4 sec. 7, T. 5 S., R. 77 W., new site of Dillon after it was moved away from the waters of Dillon Reservoir. Summit County
Dinero, NW 1/4 sec. 13, T. 9 S., R. 81 W., a station on the Colorado Midland Railway. Lake County
Dinner Station, SW corner, sec. 10, T. 4 S., R. 94 W., on the Rifle to Meeker Road 2 miles south of Rio Blanco. Garfield County
Doran, P.O., 1901 or 1902 (also called Horseshoe), NW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 10 S., R. 78 W. Park County
Dos Siding, SW 1/4 sec. 35, T. 6 S., R. 95 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. Garfield County
Dotsero (Sulphur Spring), 1880, P.O., 1883, NE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 5 S., R. 86 W., at junction of the Eagle and Grand (Colorado) Rivers. The stage from Red Cliff stopped here three times a week. Two miles east of Dotsero is the 4,150–year–old Dotsero crater and its associated flow, the youngest volcanic flow in Colorado (Giegengack, 1962; Tweto and others, 1978). Eagle County
Dotsero Station, NW 1/4 sec. 9, T. 5 S., R. 86 W. Eagle County
Douglass City (Tunneltown), center sec. 19, T. 9 S., R. 81 W. Under the trestle approach to the Hagerman Tunnel was the short–lived construction camp of the Colorado Midland Railway, southeast of the east portal of the Hagerman Tunnel. Lake County
Dowds Spur, 1870, NW 1/4 sec. 22, T. 5 S., R. 81 W., spur along the D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Dudley (Dudleyville), P.O., 1872, NW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 9 S., R. 78 W., camp and a smelter for the miners at the Moose mine, about 2 miles north of Alma and 3 miles south of Quartzville, on Hoosier Pass wagon road from Fairplay to Breckenridge. The Moose mine is still active and produces large beautiful crystals of rhodochrosite, now the official Colorado State mineral. Park County
Eagalite (Eaglite), P.O., 1885, SW 1/4 sec. 3, T. 10 S., R. 95 W., 2 miles south of Plateau City. Mesa County
Eagle (Castle, Rio Aquilla, McDonald), NW 1/4 sec. 4, T. 5 S., R. 84 W., a ranching and agricultural town and county seat on the D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Eagle City (Mitchell, Roudebush), 1878, P.O., 1880, SW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 7 S, R. 80 W., a mining camp in 1879. Summit County
Eagle County Airport, SW 1/4 sec. 3, T. 5 S., R. 85 W., just east of Gypsum. Eagle County
Eagle Park, 1887, SE 1/4 sec. 4, T. 7 S., R. 80 W., wood–burning kilns on Eagle River branch of D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
East Leadville, SW 1/4 sec. 3, T. 10 S., R. 78 W., a town on the D. & R.G. R.R. Park County
East Mitchell, SE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 8 S., R. 80 W. Eagle County
Edsum, SW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 5 S., R. 85 W., a railroad town along the Eagle River. Eagle County
Edwards (Berry's Ranch), P.O., 1883, SE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 5 S., R. 82 W., 21 miles northwest from Redcliff. Eagle County
Edwards Siding, P.O., 1883, NW 1/4 sec. 4, T. 5 S., R. 82 W. Eagle County
Eilers, NE 1/4 sec. 28, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Eldorado West, NW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 6 S., R. 77 W. Eagle County
El Jebel (see Sherman), P.O., 1923, NE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 8 S., R. 87 W. Eagle County
Elk Mountain, SE 1/4 sec. 32, T. 9 S., R. 88 W., on the C.R. & S.J. Ry. Pitkin County
Emma, P.O., 1881, NW 1/4 sec. 13, T. 8 S., R. 87 W., a station on the D. & R.G. R.R. and on the C.M. Ry. in Pitkin County
English Gulch, SE 1/4 sec. 28, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., on the northern slope of Mt. Tweto, named for Dr. Ogden Tweto, U.S. Geological Survey, one of Colorado's preeminent geologists and an expert on the geology of the Leadville area and Colorado. Lake County
Evans (Lida Junction), NW 1/4 sec. 21, T. 9 S., R 79 W., on railroad line. Lake County
Evansville (Henry, Big Evans), 1879, NW 1/4 sec. 20, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., a mining community 3 miles east of Leadville near the head of Big Evans Gulch. Lake County
Everett (Halfway House, Seiden's Ranch, Lorimer), P.O., 1881, NE 1/4 sec. 25, T. 11 S., R. 82 W., a mining camp that had a two–story stage station on the Independence Pass stage toll road between Leadville and Aspen. Along the Everett road passed strings of burros a quarter–mile long carrying supplies from Leadville. When the railroads reached Aspen, the town of Everett went out of business. Lake County
Evergreen Lakes, 1889, SE 1/4 sec. 36, T. 9 S., R. 81 W., a resort near small lakes southwest of Leadville. Had lodgings and was near a large fish hatchery. Lake County
Excelsior, 1899, SE 1/4 sec. 33, T. 5 S., R. 78 W., same location as Hathaway, a town on the C. & S. Ry. Summit County
Fairplay, 1859, P.O., 1861 (Fairplay Diggings, 1860–1861, Platte City, 1861), NE 1/4 sec. 33, T. 9 S., R. 77 W. In Fairplay is the museum of "South Park City," which is a new town composed mostly of restored old buildings moved from Buckskin Joe, Leavick, Horseshoe, and other sites. The buildings have been authentically refurnished (Eberhart, 1959). The Middle Fork South Platte River runs through the town, and the ice–age gravel deposited by the river was excavated by a giant dredge to recover gold. On the D.S.P. & P. R.R. Park County
Fairview, SE 1/4 sec. 14, T. 7 S., R. 92 W. Garfield County
Farwell, P.O., 1881, Farwell City, SE 1/4 sec. 13, T. 10 S., R. 82 W., a mine name. Also used as an alternate name of Independence, near border of Pitkin County, but in Lake County
Farwell, SE 1/4 sec. 4, T. 4 S., R. 94 W., at south edge of Book Cliffs. Garfield County
Ferguson, P.O., 1883, NW 1/4 sec. 10, T. 6 S., R. 92 W., a town just east of Silt on the D. & R.G. R.R. on the Colorado River. Garfield County
Finntown, NW 1/4 SW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., originally named Cleator Moor Gulch from a mining district near Cumberland, England. On Stray Horse Gulch, had a sauna (a steam bath and a dunk in an icy snowbank). Lake County
Flour Mill, NE 1/4 sec. 16, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., just south of Glenwood Springs on the Roaring Fork River. Garfield County
Ford Spur, SW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 8 S., R. 84 W., a spur on the Colorado Midland Railway, just west of Ruedi. Eagle County
Fort Defiance, 1879, SE 1/4 sec. 25, T. 5 S., R. 88 W., or in the middle of sec. 15, T. 5 S., R. 88 W., a settler post. This was a log stockade built by prospectors for protection from Ute Indians; on the north rim of Glenwood Canyon at head of Wagon Gulch, 6 miles northeast of Glenwood Springs and 13 miles southeast of Carbonate (Roberts, 1988; Spurr and Spurr, 1994). There also was a Defiance Mineral Claim in the SE 1/4 sec. 23, T. 5 S., R. 88 W. Garfield County
Fort Mary B. or Fort Meribeh, one mile north of Breckenridge in the NW 1/4 sec. 31, T. 6 S., R. 77 W. Summit County
Fort McHenry, sec. 13, T. 5 S., R. 78 W., shown just north of Dillon on maps dated 1879–1885. Summit County. See information about Fort McHenry under military camps
Four Mile Park, SE 1/4 sec. 17, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., on north shore of Twin Lakes Reservoir, a roadhouse on the Twin Lakes toll road. Lake County
4–Mile Spur, SW 1/4 sec. 26, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., 4 miles south of Cardiff where the railroad branches west to Sunlight and south to Marion railroad station, on the Colorado Midland Railway. Garfield County
Frawley, P.O., 1916, (near Robinson), SE 1/4 sec. 27, T. 7 S., R. 79 W., along Ten Mile Creek on the D.S.P. & P. R.R. Summit County
French Gulch, in 1880–1881, occupied by miners waiting for warm weather before moving north to the mining prospect at Carbonate, NE 1/4 sec. 15, T. 5 S., R. 87 W., near Allen and Spruce Creek. Garfield County
French Gulch, SE 1/4 sec. 21, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., site of a water tank on the D.S.P. & P. R.R. Lake County
Frisco, P.O., 1879. NW 1/4 sec. 35, T. 5 S., R. 78 W. Both the D. & R.G. R.R. and the D. & S.P. & P. R.R. had stations in Frisco. An old mining camp, now a tourist stop on highway I–70. Summit County
Frying Pan City, SE 1/4 sec. 7, T. 8 S., R. 86 W., at the junction of the Frying Pan Creek and the Roaring Fork River, was renamed Basalt in 1895. Eagle County
Frying Pan Gulch (now Rock Creek Gulch), on eastern flank of Mt. Massive, SW 1/4 sec. 36, T. 9 S., R. 81 W. Named because prospectors panned gold with a frying pan. Lake County
Fulford, 1887 (Nolan Camp), a silver mining camp for about 30 years, NW 1/4 sec. 24, T. 6 S., R. 83 W. Eagle County
Funston, NW 1/4 sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., a D. & R.G. R.R. station. Garfield County
Garfield County Airport, SW 1/4 sec. 13, T. 6 S., R. 93 W., an airport south of Cactus Valley, 4 miles southwest of Silt. Garfield County
Georgia Bar, 1860, SW corner sec. 5, T. 12 S., R. 79 W., at the mouth of Clear Creek near U.S. Highway 24. Chaffee County
Gerbazdale, P.O., 1918 (see Watson), NW 1/4 sec. 6, T. 9 S., R 85 W., northwest of Rathbone. Pitkin County
Gilman (Clinton, Battle Mountain, Rex, Rock Creek), 1879, P.O., 1886, NE 1/4 sec. 13, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., a very successful silver mining town perched on the steep sides of the cliffs of Battle Mountain. The mill is far below beside the Eagle River along the D. & R.G. R.R. tracks. Eagle County
Gleason Gulch, NE 1/4 sec. 6, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., a silver camp; a large mill was built in 1895, but burned down the same year. Lake County
Glen, SW 1/4 sec. 2, T. 2 S., R. 84 W., a D. & R.G. station along the Colorado River. Eagle County
Glenwood Springs (Boiling Springs, Fort Defiance, Defiance, Grand Springs, Grand River Hot Springs), 1883, P.O., 1884, secs. 9 and 10, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., became county seat (formerly Barlow was the county seat), reached by stage from Leadville or from Crested Butte via Aspen or by D. & R.G. R.R.; an early settlement in Ute Territory; a famous resort, the chief attraction is its wonderful hot springs. Before a bridge was built across the Colorado River, there was a ferry. Before the railroad arrived, Glenwood Springs was reached by stage from Leadville and Aspen. Garfield County
Gold Basin, NE 1/4 sec., 14, T. 10 S., R. 79 W., at head of Big Union Creek. Lake County
Gold Pan Station, center of north 1/2 sec. 6, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., on D.S.P. & P. R.R. Summit County
Gold Park, 1880, P.O., 1881, SE 1/4 sec. 27, T. 7 S., R. 81 W., larger than Holy Cross City, but a short–lived mining camp with two mills. Eagle County
Gold Run Gulch, near Breckenridge, NE 1/4 sec. 29, T. 6 S., R. 77 W. Summit County
Goldstone Camp, NW 1/4 sec. 29, T. 4 S., R. 90 W., on East Fork Elk Creek. Garfield County
Gordon, SE 1/4 sec. 16, T. 10 S., R. 80 W., about 4 miles south of Malta on the D. & R.G. R.R. Lake County
Governor, SW 1/4 sec. 31, T. 7 S., R. 78 W. Summit County
Graham Park, in the SW1/4 sec. 19 and the NW 1/4 sec. 30, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., east of Leadville between Carbonate Hill and Iron Hill. Had hotels, saloons, and a school. Buildings were still occupied in the 1920s. Lake County
Graham Station, in the SW 1/4 sec. 19 and NW 1/4 sec. 30, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R., 1.5 miles northeast of Leadville between Big and Little Evans Gulches. Lake County
Gramid, NE 1/4 sec. 4, T. 6 S., R. 91 W., a D. & R.G. R.R. station. Garfield County
Grand Mesa, P.O., 1927, NE 1/4 sec. 1, T. 12 S., R. 95 W., a community on Grand Mesa. Delta County
Grand River Hot Springs (Grand Springs, 1883), name later changed to Glenwood Springs. Garfield County
Granite, P.O., 1868, SW 1/4 sec. 11, T. 12 S., R. 79 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R., formerly county seat of Lake County, a placer mining camp that extracted gold from the gravel terraces bordering the Arkansas River, now in Chaffee County
Grass Mesa, in south 1/2 T. 6 S., T. 93 W. Garfield County
Graveline, NW 1/4 sec. 8, T. 7 S., R. 78 W., a stop on the D.S.P. & P. R.R. Summit County
Green Mountain, SE 1/4 sec. 11, T. 2 S., R. 80 W. Summit County
Green Mountain Camp, SW 1/4 sec. 13, T. 2 S., R. 80 W., on shore of Green Mountain Reservoir. Summit County
Greens Spur, SW 1/4 sec. 35, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., a stop on Colorado Midland Railway. Garfield County
Gresham (location?), P.O., 1883, probably about 1.5 miles south of Carbonate between SW 1/4 sec. 3 and SW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 4 S., R. 89 W., at head of Grizzly Creek and near Canyon Creek. Garfield County
Grizzly Station, NE 1/4 sec. 6, T. 6 S., R. 88 W., on the D. & R.G. 4 miles east of Glenwood Springs. Garfield County
Grubbs, NE 1/4 sec. 10, T. 8 S., R. 88 W., a station on the Crystal River and San Juan Railroad, where potatoes were grown. Garfield County
Gulch (earlier Spring Gulch, later named Jerome Park), P.O., 1895, SE 1/4 sec. 22, T. 8 S., R. 89 W., Spring Gulch Station on Colorado Midland Railway, along Thompson Creek. Pitkin County
Gutchell's, 1881, a small railroad station in the NE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 8 S., R. 80 W. Eagle County
Gypsum, P.O., 1883, SW 1/4 sec. 5, T. 5 S., R. 85 W., a major station on the D. & R.G. R.R. along the Eagle River. Eagle County
Hagerman, NW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 9 S., R. 81 W., at the Hagerman Tunnel and the Hagerman Trestle on the C.M. Ry. (see figure 3). Pitkin County
Halfway House (see Tabor City), SE 1/4 sec.16, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., a rest station for travelers on their journey over Fremont Pass. Lake County
Hanging Lake, sec. 19, T. 5 S., R. 87 W. Garfield County
Hangtown, near Leadville, 1860s. This town was mentioned in two reports. In Blair (1980, p. 61): "Different sections of the city have picturesque names—Tin Town in Poverty Flats and Hangtown." The report of Boyd and Carson (1985) on page 4 states that Hangtown is a "Section of Leadville," but then their map shows Hangtown grouped with Shanty Town, Chicken Hill, and Ten–Mile Gulch about 3 miles east of Leadville. I can't believe that Hangtown would have been far from Leadville. Therefore, with no better information than is available in those two references, the location of Hangtown remains unknown. In fact, Sam McGeorge (written communication, 2003) of the Natonal Mining Hall of Fame and Museum said that a network of his older friends, history buffs, and lifelong residents never had heard of Hangtown. Consequently, they also did not know where it had been. Lake County
Harrison, a name proposed but vetoed as a name for Leadville area; named for Edwin Harrison, an early settler. Lake County
Harris Spur, NE 1/4 sec. 33, T. 7 S., R. 87 W., a station on the C.M. Ry. Eagle County
Harvard, SW 1/4 sec. 24, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., a station on the D. & R.G. R.R. at the mouth of Lake Creek. Lake County
Hathaway, SE 1/4 sec. 33, T. 5 S., R. 78 W., on D.S.P. & P. R.R., same location as Excelsior. Summit County
Hawxhurst, P.O., 1882, NW 1/4 sec. 27, T. 9 S., R. 94 W. (see post road 107), a stock–raising community south of Plateau Creek near its junction with Park Creek. Mesa County
Hayden, 1875 (Dana, Kobe), NE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., a station on D. & R.G. R.R. Lake County
Hayden Ranch, NW 1/4 sec. 3, T. 11 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Heeney, P.O., 1939, NE 1/4 sec. 23, T. 2 S., R. 80 W. Summit County
Heiberger, P.O., 1908, middle of south edge, sec. 18, T. 9 S., R. 93 W., on Buzzard Creek. Mesa County
Hell Gate, SW 1/4 sec. 3, T. 9 S., R. 82 W., a lookout point above Nast on the Colorado Midland Railway. Pitkin County
Henry, 1880, 3.5 miles northeast of Leadville, probably in the center sec. 6, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., along the East Fork, Arkansas River (Eberhart, 1959, p. 210; Kernochan, 1956, p. 196). Lake County
Higby, SW 1/4 sec. 35, T. 5 S., R. 88 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. just southwest of old Fort Defiance. Garfield County
Highland, now Aspen Highlands, 1879, SE 1/4 sec. 35, T. 10 S., R. 85 W., mining camp and later ski area at the confluence of Castle Creek and Conundrum Creek. Pitkin County
Holden Works, SW 1/4 sec. 12, T. 10 S., R. 85 W., in Aspen. Pitkin County
Holland, P.O., 1874, SW 1/4 sec. 23, T. 9 S., R. 78 W., on L.S.P. & L.S.L. R.R., site of Holland Reduction Works (1874–1875?). Park County
Holy Cross City, 1880, P.O., 1882, NW 1/4 sec. 29, T. 7 S., R. 81 W., mining camp, nearby Mount of the Holy Cross was made a U.S. National Monument in 1929; the arms of the cross are 450 feet across and the cross is 1,400 feet long. Eagle County
Homer, 1881, probably in sec. 29, T. 6 S., R. 80 W., a small station on the D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Homestake, 1871, a mining camp in the center W 1/2 sec. 12, T. 8 S., R. 81 W. Garfield County
Homestake, 1882, SW 1/4 sec. 13, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., a small station on the D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Hooks, NE 1/4 sec. 15, T. 8 S., R. 88 W., approximately located. Garfield County
Hopkins Spur, SW 1/4 sec. 11, T. 8 S., R. 85 W. Eagle County
Horseshoe, P.O., 1880, SW 1/4 sec. 2, T. 10 S., R. 78 W., a mining and lumbering center on D.S.P. & P. R.R., first silver strike in valley before 1879, had a smelter, abandoned in 1893, name also was used at Doran. Horseshoe also was called East Leadville (Eberhart, 1959, p. 133). Park County
Hot Springs, NW 1/4 sec. 4, T. 10 S., R. 88 W., stage and postal(?) station 1877–1895, on Crystal River, south of Avalanche Creek. Pitkin County
Howland, P.O., 1879, center sec. 32, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., named for Colonel Henry Howland, manager of the Birdseye Lumber Co. The town was north of Birdseye on Blue River Branch of D. & R.G. R.R., and in 2001 it was on the L.C. & S. Ry. Lake County
Humphrey, NW 1/4 sec. 31, T. 8 S., R. 82 W., a stop on the C.M. Ry. about 2 miles northwest of Mallon Tunnel. Pitkin County
Ibex, P.O., 1896, NE 1/4 sec. 21, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., between Breece Hill and south Evans Gulch; the principal mine was the Little Jonny (later the Ibex). It produced 13 million dollars worth of gold from 1893 to 1923. By 1897 the output was as much as $250,000 per month (Eberhart, 1959). Lake County
Independence, P.O., 1882 (Chipeta, Mammoth City, Mount Hope, and Farwell), SE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 11 S., R. 83 W., one of the first camps near Aspen. Its most productive period was in the 1880s, but activity continued beyond 1900. Vestiges of the camp are a short distance west of and below Independence Pass. Travelers over the pass, which opened in 1881, can view several 14,000–foot peaks, including Mount Elbert at 14,431 feet, Colorado's highest. Independence pass also is one of the highest passes in Colorado at an altitude of 12,095 feet. Access to the pass was on a toll road. One community on the road to Aspen was Everett, which had a two story stage station (Halfway house or Seiden's Ranch) in 1881. The pass was first called Hunters Pass and was used as an extension of the old Lake Creek Trail or Twin Lake and Roaring Fork Toll Road. Despite its ruggedness, it was traveled by a steady stream of wagons and stagecoaches during the mining boom at Aspen and was a station on the Twin Lakes toll road. Independence Pass now is paved but is closed from November through May because of the certainty of deep snow. Pitkin County
Interlaken, P.O., 1887, SW 1/4 sec. 21, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., between the two Twin Lakes, called the Lake Side Resort in 1880. Lake County
Iron Hill, P.O., 1883, SW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 9 S., R. 79 W. Lake County
Irwins Brick Yard Spur, NE 1/4 sec. 20, T. 8 S., R. 86 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. line. Pitkin County
Ivanhoe, P.O., 1888, SE 1/4 sec. 13, T. 9 S., R. 82 W., at northwest end of Busk–Ivanhoe Tunnel. Ivanhoe was a railroad stop and a residence of construction workers during construction of the tunnel (figure 3). Pitkin County
Ives Station (Nada), NE 1/4 sec. 11, T. 6 S., R. 93 W. Garfield County
Jacktown, 1880, NE 1/4 sec. 27, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., southwest of Leadville on the D. & R.G. Ry. line to Malta in "Smelter Valley." Lake County
Janeway, 1880 (Mobleys Camp), P.O., 1887, SE 1/4 sec. 20 or NE 1/4 sec. 29, T. 9 S., R. 88 W., near mouth of Avalanche Creek. A gold camp and a railroad station town were re–established in 1890 at the mouth of Avalanche Creek. Pitkin County
Jerome Park (Spring Gulch), 1888(?), SE 1/4 sec. 22, T. 8 S., R. 89 W., coal town operated by C.F. & I. until about 1914. Pitkin County
Josie, P.O., 1882, also shown on maps of 1884, 1885, and 1889, NW 1/4 sec. 15, T. 4 S., R. 78 W. Summit County
Junction Cabin, early 1880s, NE 1/4 sec. 33, T. 10 S., R. 84 W., at the confluence of Independence (Roaring Fork) and Difficult Creeks. Pitkin County
Junction City, 1879, SW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 5 S., R. 77 W., on Keystone branch of the D.S.P. & P. R.R.; the original name for Dillon. Summit County
Junction City, 1879, NE 1/4 sec. 23, T. 7 S., R. 79 W., a tent city that became a northern part of Kokomo, on flat just north of Kokomo, absorbed by Kokomo. Summit County
Junction City, early 1880s, NE 1/4 sec. 6, T. 10 S., R. 80 W., at junction of Lake Fork and Rock Creek (Rock Creek formerly called Frying Pan Gulch?). Lake County
Junction House, SE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 11 S., R. 83 W., a stage station stop where road turns south along Lincoln Creek to Ruby. Pitkin County
Keay, SE 1/4 sec, 18, T. 4 S., R. 83 W. Eagle County
Keck, SE 1/4 sec. 28, T. 7 S., R. 88 W. Garfield County
Keefer Spur, SW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 9 S., R. 81 W., (see figure 3) on the Colorado Midland Railway. Pitkin County
Keeldar Station, NE 1/4 sec. 33, T. 8 S., R. 80 W., mining and lumbering center south of Crane Park, 3 miles north of Leadville Junction. Lake County
Kelleys Diggings (Kelleys Bar), SE 1/4 sec. 6, T. 12 S., R. 79 W., A.G. Kelley in the fall of 1859 discovered a promising placer gold deposit on the Arkansas River near junction with Pine Creek just south of Granite. Chaffee County
Kellogg, T. 12 S., R. 84 or 85 W. Pitkin County
Keystone, NW 1/4 sec. 4, T. 6 S., R. 91 W. Garfield County
Kiggin, NW 1/4 sec. 29, T. 7 S., R. 88 W. Garfield County
Kile, NE 1/4 sec. 28, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Knights Station, NW 1/4 sec. 24, T. 6 S., R. 81 W. Eagle County
Kobe, NE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., 3 miles north of Balltown on the D. & R.G. R.R. Lake County
Kokomo, P.O., 1879, NW 1/4 sec. 23, T. 7 S., R. 79 W., 2 miles north of Robinson, on the eastern slope of Sheep Mountain just south of Kokomo Gulch. The Leadville line of the D.S.P. & P. R.R. actually skirted Kokomo because of the problem of avoiding the Stettaur Placer and the Fort Kruger problem (see Fort Kruger in the list of military posts). The Blue River Branch of the D. & R.G. R.R. ran through Kokomo. Kokomo is now threatened from tailings of the Climax settling pond. Post Office closed 1965. Summit County
LaBontes Hole, 1847(?), center S 1/2 sec. 18, T. 5 S., R. 77 W., at confluence of Snake River, Tenmile Creek, and the Blue River, an old rendezvous site (the site of early Dillon). LaBonte was a French Canadian trapper. Summit County
Lacy, center east edge of sec. 22, T. 6 S., R. 94 W. Garfield County
Lake City, SE 1/4 sec. 14, T. 8 S., R. 81 W., on West Tennessee Creek above 11,000 feet in a hazardous snow–slide area below a major glacial cirque. Lake County
Lake County Airport, E 1/2 sec. 34, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Lakeside, P.O., 1882, NE 1/4 sec. 19, T. 2 S., R. 79 W., at or near Plain at south end of Green Mountain Reservoir, stock–raising community. Summit County
Laurette, founded 1859, P.O. in 1861, SE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 9 S., R. 78 W., called Buckskin in 1860, Buckskin Joe in 1862, SE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 9 S., R. 78 W. The Phillips Lode was discovered in 1861, a gold–bearing vein 25–60 feet wide that produced $500,000 worth of ore in two years. Park County
Lead City, name proposed, but vetoed as one of the names for Leadville. Lake County
Leadville, P.O., 1877, secs. 23, 24, 25, 26, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. (Other associated towns were Agassiz, Boughtown, California Gulch, Carbonate Camp, Cleator Moor, Finntown, Graham Park, new and old Oro Cities, Poverty Flat, Sacramento City, Slabtown, Tintown, and others. See figure 4.) Leadville had several successful boom times over the years. The first was in 1860 with the discovery and exploitation of very rich placer–gold deposits along California Gulch just southwest and southeast of the present Leadville. About 10,000 prospectors and others arrived in the gulch and recovered a great amount of gold. Within about two years the recovery rate decreased markedly partly because of a heavy black sand that made it hard to recover the gold particles and partly because there was too little water flowing in California Gulch to do the panning. Tests in about 1875 of the black sand showed that it was carbonate of lead that contained about 40 ounces of silver per ton. In 1878, the word spread about the high concentration of silver, and prospectors flooded into the Leadville area. The silver was coming from veins that contained lead and silver, but most veins were covered by surficial deposits and were not visible at the ground surface. Excavation was necessary. Successful miners found rich silver claims in the hilly areas north of California Gulch and east of Leadville. Millions of dollars were made from many of the claims (Eberhart, 1959; Dorset, 1970). However, Leadville soon became overcrowded. Exorbitant prices were charged for sleeping places. Many people died of exposure and starvation. Crime became very common, and lawmen were unable to cope with the problems. The occupied area grew and many small communities were started, including Oro City, Poverty Flats, Agassiz, Slabtown, and Boughtown. The name Boughtown referred to the dense grove of coniferous trees that were growing in the Leadville area when miners first arrived. The name Boughtown also referred to the summer lodgings composed of four posts and a covering of evergreen boughs that were used to thatch the outsides of the structure. However, very soon most of the trees were cut for buildings and mine timbers. The name Leadville probably was chosen for the town because lead was the major mineral in both the placers and in the lode mines. In the late 1880s, the population rose to 25,000–30,000. In Colorado in the 1880s, Leadville was second only to Denver in population. Many kinds of businesses lined the streets. One street had banks, hotels, and restaurants, and another street had saloons, gambling halls, and parlor houses. Leadville is the highest incorporated city in the world (10,000 feet, Eberhart, 1959), and so high that the ground is frozen most of the year. In 1893, the repeal of the Sherman Silver Purchase Act caused a panic in Leadville and in all of Colorado's silver camps. The price of silver fell rapidly and eventually many of the silver mines closed. Lake County.
The Sherman Silver Purchase Act will be explained here, including why it was needed and why it was discontinued. In 1885, Colorado Congressmen championed a return to a silver coinage. Congressmen of other States and also mining men encouraged the support of silver. On July 14, 1890, during President Benjamin Harrison's administration, the Sherman Silver Purchase Act was passed. It nearly doubled the amount of silver that would be purchased by the United States Treasury, an amount that had been guaranteed by the earlier Bland–Allison legislation, which was 4,500,000 ounces of silver a month, apparently enough to absorb most of the then current silver production in the United States. Because of increased buying of silver by the government, the silver price began to rise. However after reaching $1.00 per ounce in 1890, it began to fall and by 1894 it fell to 63 cents per ounce. Because of the continued decline in the price of silver and because of a sharp decrease in the nation's stock of gold, the Sherman Silver act was repealed. As a means of improving the financial condition of the country, the repeal really was an anticlimax, because Colorado and the country already were in a serious depression caused partly by the sudden drop in value of silver, but mostly as a result of world–wide economic problems. The drop in the price of silver and the country's serious economic depression was disastrous for the owners of silver mines and for those whose assets were based on the value of silver.
The miners in Leadville went on strike for better working conditions and for a raise in pay on two different occasions. On May 26, 1880 the first general strike was called by the Leadville miners. Martial law was declared and on June 13, 1880, the Colorado National Guard was brought in and served until June 22, 1880. The use of the soldiers during this short strike cost Colorado tax payers more than $24,000.
Information about the election of October 7, 1879, in Lake County, Colorado—The votes cast in each of Leadville's 12 precincts were tabulated by the October 13, 1879, issue of the Chronicle Newspaper. The information showed the population of each precinct and also of the existing communities in Lake County in and near Leadville (Griswold and Griswold, 1996, p. 378).
Precinct 1, Oro City and upper California Gulch, 216
Precinct 2, Adelaide and Stray Horse Gulch, 99
Precinct 3, Evansville, Big, Little, and South Evans Gulches, 140
Precinct 4, northeast section of Leadville, 814
Precinct 5, southeast section of Leadville, 752
Precinct 6, southwest section of Leadville, 813
Precinct 7, northwest section of Leadville, 866
Precinct 8, Malta and the upper part of the Arkansas Valley, 169
Precinct 9, Tabor City, East Arkansas and Birdseye Gulches, 50
Precinct 10, Lake Creek and area near its junction with the Arkansas River, 14
Precinct 11, Twin Lakes and upper parts of Lake Creek, 25
Precinct 12, Colorado Gulch and Soda Springs, 50
In June 1896, the miners in the Leadville mines were receiving wages of only $3.00 per day or even as low as $2.50 per day. The miners held that they could not support their families or buy food on only $2.50 per day, and that even $3.00 was too meager to be a living wage. Many of the miners then joined the Cloud City Miners Union. A union request to the mine owners for a uniform $3.00 wage was refused because the owners said that they were already losing money on the mines in Leadville. During a union meeting on June 19, 1896, by an almost unanimous vote the miners chose to stop the work of all employees receiving less than $3.00 per day. Negotiations became impossible and by June 23 almost 2,300 miners were unemployed. The second general strike started on the 26th of June, when 968 miners went on strike. Pumpmen, firemen, and engineers were hired and became the only ones working in some mines. However, despite the strike, the mine owners decided to reopen the mines. First to open were the mines paying less than $3 a day, followed by those paying $3. The miners objected to the reopening of the mines. To counteract this, the mine owners called in non–union strikebreakers. Trouble erupted, so the mine owners asked the Colorado Governor to intervene.
The Colorado State militia was alerted to the tension, and on September 21, 1896, soldiers of the militia from the Denver area began to arrive by train in Leadville. There was no place available to lodge the soldiers, so they began to set up a tent camp on a baseball field on the north side of Leadville, then called Camp McIntire. The soldiers in the militia had come to town without adequate clothing or tents, and it took quite a while to get them clothing and tents to survive in snowy Leadville. On September 25, 1896, 65 nonmilitary miners arrived from Missouri to become strike breakers. They were marched toward the Emmet and Coronado mines surrounded by the militia, who were protectors of the mines and the miners. The arrival of the Missouri miners made the operation of some mines possible and partly negated the effect of the strike on the mine owners. The strike continued until the first week of March 1897. A meeting of the union was then held where the miners discussed the strike, and 900 miners voted to end it. The militia campaign had lasted 172 days; the number of militia in camp ranged from 827 to only 57 at the end of the encampment. The strike cost the Colorado taxpayers a total of $194,010.43. The flooding of the mines was so bad that some mines took two years to reopen; however, some mines never reopened. The striking miners never did receive a uniform wage of $3.00 a day. The cost of the strike in lives, property, and human suffering could never be measured.
Leadville Junction, NW 1/4 sec. 21, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., a major railroad junction of the D. & R.G. R.R. 2 miles northwest of Leadville. Lake County
Leadville Landing Field, secs. 9 and 10, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Leal, P.O., 1914, NW 1/4 sec. 8, T. 3 S., R. 77 W., on the Williams Fork River. Grand County
Leavick, 1873, P.O., 1896, SW 1/4 sec. 8, T. 10 S., R. 78 W., mining camp; ore was carried down from the Hilltop mine at an altitude of 13,150 feet on a long aerial cable to the mills. The mine closed in 1893; however, it was re–opened in 1901 and continued to operate until 1930 to mine zinc carbonate (Wolle, 1974, p. 98). Later, the buildings at the mine were taken to the South Park City ghost town at Fairplay. Park County
Lenado, P.O., 1891 (Woody), NW 1/4 sec. 27, T. 9 S., R. 84 W., a busy lead–zinc camp and sawmill. Pitkin County
Leon, P.O., 1883, SE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 11 S., R. 94 W., plotted from maps by Adams and Son (1884) and Kistler (1881); at Leon Park 3.5 miles south of Plateau Creek. Mesa County
Leon, SW 1/4 sec. 11, T. 8 S., R. 87 W. Eagle County
Lida Junction (see Evans), NW 1/4 sec. 21, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., just east of Leadville, on Chrysolite Extension of D. & R.G. R.R. about 3.5 miles east of east edge of Leadville. Lake County
Lime Creek, SE 1/4 sec. 18, T. 8 S., R. 83 W. Pitkin County
Linderman, NW 1/4 sec. 27, T. 8 S., R. 79 W. Lake County
Little Chicago, NE 1/4 SW 1/4 sec. 27, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., just north of Stringtown, workers at the Arkansas Valley Smelter lived there. Lake County
Little Giant (Bennet's Mill), 1881, about in the NE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 8 S., R. 80 W., a small station on the D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Log Spur, SW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 8 S., R. 84 W., on the Colorado Midland Railway. Eagle County
London, 1884, NE 1/4 sec. 7, T. 9 S., R. 77 W., mining and stock–raising community. Park County
London, P.O., 1883 (Alma Station, Alma Junction, London Junction), NW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 9 S., R. 77 W., terminal for the London, South Park, & Leadville Railroad, a 6–mile–long spur up to the London mines. These mines were in operation for more than 50 years (Boyd and Carson, 1985). Park County
London Mill, SW 1/4 sec. 6, T. 9 S., R. 78 W. Park County
Maid of Erin mine, sec. 24, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Mallon Tunnel, NE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 9 S., R. 82 W., station on the Colorado Midland Railway. Pitkin County
Malta (Swilltown), P.O., 1875, NE 1/4 sec. 32, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., on D. & R.G. R.R. This was the first smelter near Leadville. Lake County. (See figure 4.)
Mammoth City, alternate name of Independence. Pitkin County
Marble City (Clarence, Yule Creek), P.O., 1890, NE 1/4 sec. 27, T. 11 S., R. 88 W. Marble City had a railroad station and was the terminus of the Crystal River and San Juan Railroad. Marble, the building material, was discovered here in 1882, and quarries were opened in 1890. The Treasury Mountain Railroad started from the city in 1907 (see figure 5). Several companies developed the quarries. The first two camps were Clarence and Yule Creek. Later they were combined to form the present town of Marble. In 1926, fire destroyed the marble cutting–shed and the finishing mill and damaged part of the town. The marble quarries closed in November 1941, and the railroad into the town and into the quarries was removed. Since then, the marble quarry has been reopened to extract more marble. The marble is now transported by truck and is finished elsewhere. Marble from the quarries has been used extensively in Colorado, Washington, D.C., and elsewhere in the Nation. Muddy landslides and debris flows have periodically swept across and destroyed houses and buried roads in the northern part of Marble. Gunnison County
Marion, P.O., 1889, NE 1/4 sec. 15, T. 8 S., R. 89 W., C.F. & I. coal camp in 1887 southwest of Cardiff on the C.M. Ry., camp was active until about 1918(?). Garfield County
Markell, location(?), on the stage line from Leadville(?), county unknown
Maroon, NE 1/4 sec. 11, T. 10 S., R. 85 W., on the C.M. Ry. near Aspen. Pitkin County
Maroon Bells, secs. 15 and 22, T. 11 S., R. 86 W., a group of very scenic peaks. Pitkin County
Masontown (see Mt. Royal), SE 1/4 sec. 34, T. 5 S., R. 78 W., on the D.S.P. & P. R.R. Summit County
Massive City, SW 1/4 sec. 36, T. 8 S., R. 83 W., a carbonate camp that boomed in 1874, on the C.M. Ry. near Frying Pan Creek. Pitkin County
Mayo Station (or Mayo Gulch or Mayo Spur Station), SE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., on C. & S. Ry. 2 miles east of Breckenridge and 1 mile southeast of Puzzle on Illinois Gulch. Summit County
McAllisters Station, SW 1/4 sec. 4, T. 7 S., R. 80 W., station on D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
McClure House (McClure Pass), SW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 11 S., R. 89 W., a stage stop. Pitkin County
McCoy, P.O., 1891, NE 1/4 sec. 6, T. 2 S., R. 83 W., on D. & S.L. Ry. Eagle County
McCoy Stage Station, 1891, SE 1/4 sec. 32, T. 1 S., R. 83 W. Routt County
Meadows (Sellar), P.O., 1888, SE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 8 S., R. 83 W., on C.M. Ry. Pitkin County
Medio, SW 1/4 sec. 11, T. 10 S., R. 89 W., a railroad and coal village halfway between Redstone and Coal Basin. Pitkin County
Meilly, P.O., 1882, NE 1/4 sec. 35, T. 11 S., R. 82 W., a small mining camp east of the Continental Divide on South Fork Lake Creek southwest of Everett. Chaffee County
Mellor, NW corner sec. 15, T. 9 S., R. 85 W., location uncertain. Pitkin County
Meredith, P.O., 1893, NW 1/4 sec. 14, T. 8 S., R. 84 W., Colorado Midland Railway station, 1889. A limestone quarry and lumber camp, now a resort area. Pitkin County
Meyer, this name of a Swiss educator was proposed in 1877 but vetoed as a name for the town of Leadville. Lake County
Miller Creek Station, NW 1/4 sec. 14, T. 8 S., R. 84 W., railroad station. Pitkin County
Mineral Park, SW 1/4 sec. 26, T. 8 S., R. 78 W. Park County
Minturn, P.O., 1889, SW 1/4 sec. 26, T. 5 S., R. 81 W., D. & R.G. R.R. station, a railroad and lumber town. Eagle County
Missouri Camp, 1880, SE 1/4 sec. 32, T. 7 S., R. 81 W., 2 miles southeast of Holy Cross City and 1.5 miles southeast of Camp Fancy. Eagle County
Mitchell, P.O., 1883, SE 1/4 sec. 34, T. 7 S., R. 80 W., formerly Roudebush, D. & R.G. R.R. station in 1878, renamed Mitchell, placers nearby called Eagle City. Eagle County
Mitchell Station, 1878, NE 1/4 sec. 34 , T. 7 S., R. 80 W., on D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Monte, SE 1/4 sec. 21, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., railroad station, on East Fork Arkansas River. Lake County
Monte Cristo (Quandary City), SE 1/4 sec. 2, T. 8 S., R. 78 W., north of Hoosier Pass. Summit County
Montezuma, SE 1/4 sec. 11, T. 12 S., R. 85 W., camp at Montezuma mine. Pitkin County
Montgomery, 1859, P.O., 1862, NE 1/4 sec. 14, T. 8 S., R. 78 W., a fast–growing mining camp until 1870, when it had a couple of revivals, now covered by Montgomery Reservoir, Post Office moved to Dudley before reservoir was built. Park County
Morris, P.O., 1902, NE 1/4 sec. 29, T. 6 S., R. 94 W., D. & R.G. R.R. station. Garfield County
Mosquito (Sterling City), 1861, center E 1/2, sec. 6, T. 9 S., R. 78 W., located 3.3 miles west of Buckskin Joe, first a placer camp, later became a stage and wagon stop soon after Mosquito Pass was opened. Father Dyer, a Methodist preacher used the pass during the winter of 1864 (Murray and Lee, 1978, p. 39). Before the pass was improved, some people died during attempts to cross this dangerous pass in the winter. The toll station was on the east side of the pass. A hotel, eating places, saloons, and stores were open for travelers. Mosquito camp was closed by 1910 (Boyd and Carson, 1985). The annual burro race now crosses this pass. Park County
Mount Hope, SE 1/4, sec. 12, T. 11 S., R. 82 W., an alternate name of Independence. Pitkin County
Mount Royal (see Masontown), SE 1/4 sec. 34, T. 5 S., R. 78 W., just southwest of Frisco. Summit County
Moyer (Oro Junction), 1862, NE 1/4 sec. 27, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., less than 1 mile west of Leadville. Lake County
Moyer, 1880s, SW 1/4 sec. 29, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., a mining community just north of new Oro City (Rogers, 1967). Lake County
Muckawanago (Muckawango), SW 1/4 sec. 17, T. 8 S., R. 83 W., Indian word meaning place where bear walks, first a timber loading spur, then a resort 2 miles southeast of Thomasville. Pitkin County
Mudsill, NE 1/4 sec. 22, T. 8 S., R. 88 W., station on Hilltop Junction and Leavick Branch of the D.S.P. & P. R.R., a small short–lived mining camp during the 1870s. Park County
Mulford, SW 1/4 sec. 31, T. 7 S., R. 87 W., approximately located. Garfield County
Mullenville, P.O., 1880, SE 1/4 sec. 13, T. 10 S., R. 78 W., a ranching community west of Pearts on Fourmile Creek. Park County
Myers Camp, SW corner sec. 23, T. 11 S., R. 82 W., a station and road house on the Twin Lakes Toll Road. Lake County
Nada (see Ives Station and Antlers) NE 1/4 sec. 11, T. 6 S., R. 93 W., D. & R.G. R.R. station. Garfield County
Naomi, P.O., 1883–1907, NE 1/4 sec. 9, T. 4 S., R. 78 W., stock–raising community, on the Blue River 10 miles northwest of Dillon. Summit County
Nast, 1900, P.O., 1909–1963, NW 1/4 sec. 6, T. 9 S., R. 82 W., resort on Colorado Midland Railway. Pitkin County
Nast Loop, 1893, NW 1/4 sec. 5, and center north half sec. 6, T. 9 S., R. 82 W. Pitkin County
Negro Gulch (Barney Ford Gulch) 1859, in French Gulch, NE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., placer mining area. Summit County
New Castle, P.O., 1888 (Chapman, 1867, 1884; Grand Butte, 1886; New Castle, 1888; and Elk Creek), NE 1/4 sec. 31, T. 5 S., R. 90 W., coal mining center along D. & R.G. R.R. and the Colorado Midland Railway. Garfield County
New Leavick, SW 1/4 sec. 5, T. 10 S., R. 78 W., about 1 mile above Leavick, some newer buildings, mining of lead and zinc ores. Park County
New York Cabins, SE 1/4 sec. 17, T. 6 S., R. 82 W., mining camp northeast of New York Mountains. Eagle County
Niche Station, SW corner sec. 20, T. 4 S., R. 86 W., D. & R.G. R.R., 2–3 miles north of Dotsero. Eagle County
Nichols Spur (Oro Grande), SE 1/4 sec, 18, T. 5 S., R. 77 W., just east of Dillon. Summit County
Nine Mile House, NW 1/4, sec. 22, T. 10 S., R. 80 W., on the Arkansas River at the west end of the Weston Pass road, on D. & R.G. R.R. Lake County
Norrie, P.O., 1894, SE 1/4 sec. 28, T. 8 S., R 83 W., lumber camp, Colorado Midland Railway. Station on Frying Pan Creek. Pitkin County
North Fork, NE 1/4 sec. 20, T. 8 S., R. 83 W., on Colorado Midland Railway southeast of Muckawanago. Pitkin County
Nugget Gulch, NE 1/4 sec. 19, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., between Evans Gulch and Little Evans Gulch. Lake County
Officers, SW 1/4 sec. 8, T. 6 S., R. 78 W., on D.S.P. & P. Ry. along Tenmile Creek. Summit County
Old Danford Indian Agency (see White River Agency), T. 1 S., R. 93 W. Rio Blanco County
Orestod, NW 1/4 sec. 21, T. 2 S., R. 83 W., across from Bond on D. & S.L. Ry. along the Colorado River. Eagle County
Oro City (old), 1859, P.O., 1861, at southern edge of Leadville (see Slabtown), NE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., placer miners in California Gulch said that they were living in Oro City regardless of the locations of their placer claims. One author said that Oro City had one long main street that ran the length of California Gulch. An unofficial post office also moved around within the gulch, but probably finally was at the south–central edge of present Leadville in the NE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. In 1861, Augusta Tabor wrote that William Van Brooklyn brought the mail from Fairplay to her unofficial post office and that she paid him 75 cents for each letter. The post office then was in the Tabor's house in California Gulch at the southwest corner of Harrison Avenue and Chestnut Street. Streets and houses lined California Gulch, which was a placer gold camp (along with Oro City) that lasted only about 4 years. Thousands of prospectors crowded in to share in the abundant placer gold. In 1869, an estimated $5,412,000 in gold had been panned. According to Emmons and others (1927, p. 135) old Oro City was abandoned in 1864. Lake County
Oro City (new) had a Post Office in 1868–1870, SW 1/4 sec. 29, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., in California Gulch above the mouth of Whites Gulch 3 miles southeast of Leadville. The mining community of Moyer was just north of new Oro City (Rogers, 1967). [New] Oro City survived until 1895, then became part of Leadville. Lake County
Oro Grande, SE 1/4 sec. 18, T. 5 S., R. 77 W., southeast of Dillon. Summit County
Oro Junction (same as Moyer), NE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Ortega, sec. 24, T. 4 S., R. 84 W., a community along the Eagle River on the D. & R.G. R.R. Eagle County
Overland, NW 1/4 sec. 9, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., just west of Fourmile Creek. Garfield County
Pacific Spur, SW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 6 S., R. 80 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. along Eagle River. Eagle County
Pando, P.O., 1891, NE 1/4 sec. 9, T. 7 S., R. 80 W., along the D. & R.G. R.R., first a mining town, but then became a construction camp during the building of Camp Hale; later it served as a railroad station for Camp Hale, home of 10th Mountain Division, U.S. Army. Eagle County
Park City, P.O., 1879, SE 1/4 sec. 10, T. 9 S., R. 78 W., a mining camp about 2 miles west of Alma on the wagon road to Leadville and along the London South Park & Leadville Shortline Railroad, along Mosquito Creek. Park County
Pat, SW 1/4 sec. 13, T. 9 S., R. 78 W., 0.5 mile southwest of Alma. Park County
Peachblow, P.O., 1890, NW 1/4 sec. 8, T. 8 S., R. 85 W., at red sandstone quarries of the C.M. Ry along Frying Pan Creek. Eagle County
Pearts, SW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 10 S., R. 77 W., on the D.S.P. & P. Ry. on Fourmile Creek near Horseshoe Mountain. Park County
Penn Junction, SW 1/4 sec. 17, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., along the East Fork Arkansas River and on the D.S.P. & P. R.R. Lake County
Pershing, P.O., 1918, NW 1/4 sec. 16, T. 1 S., R. 83 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. along Rock Creek, 4 miles north of McCoy. Routt County
Pigtail Gulch, SE 1/4 sec. 29, T. 9 S., R. 79 W. Lake County
Pine Creek, SE 1/4 sec. 8, T. 12 S., R. 79 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. along the Arkansas River. Chaffee County
Placer (later Dickey), 7 miles north of Breckenridge. Summit County
Placita, P.O., 1899, SE 1/4 sec. 6, T. 11 S., R. 88 W., a railroad center and a C.F. & I. coal mine along the Crystal River and on the Crystal River & San Juan Railroad and the Crystal River Railroad. For some time, it was a shipping place for the marble quarries. At first, the access to Placita was from the south through the Gunnison country and over Schofield Pass. Later the Crystal River & San Juan Railroad and the Elk Mountain Railroad provided access along the Crystal River valley with service to Marble. The Crystal River valley finally was connected to a road from Carbondale to Marble. Divides in the terrain at the southern edge of the quadrangle near Marble were traveled over by thousands of wagons, coaches, and prospectors on their way into the Crystal River country. Now the divide area offers only some poorly maintained rough roads and many hiker trails. The segment of the Crystal River & San Juan Railroad from Placita to Marble was abandoned in 1941. Also in 1941 the Crystal River Railroad was abandoned from Carbondale to Placita. Pitkin County
Plain, P.O., 1898, SW 1/4 sec. 21, T. 2 S., R. 79 W., on the road from Dillon to Kremmling. Summit County
Plateau, P.O., 1883, middle of sec. 20, T. 10 S., R. 94 W., on the slope north of Grand Mesa. Mesa County
Plateau City, P.O., 1901, NW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 9 S., R. 95 W., along Buzzard Creek and Plateau Valley. Mesa County
Platte Station, P.O., 1878, SW 1/4 sec. 22, T. 11 S., R. 78 W., stock–raising area and a stage station on Weston Pass road along the South Fork South Platte River. Park County
Pocahontas Spur, SE 1/4 sec. 22, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., on the C.M. Ry. along Four Mile Creek. Garfield County
Poverty Flat, SE 1/4 sec. 14, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., just northeast of Leadville on the D.S.P. & P. R.R. south of Evans Gulch. Tintown is in Poverty Flat. Lake County
Powder Station, NW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 10 S., R. 85 W., on the C.M. Ry. along the Roaring Fork River. Pitkin County
Preston, 1875, NW 1/4 sec. 29, T. 6 S., R. 77 W., gold camp 0.5 mile west of Gold Run Gulch. The occupants of the camp mined placers and lodes rich in gold, silver, copper, and lead. Summit County
Prospect, P.O., 1886, SE 1/4 sec. 18, T. 11 S., R. 88 W., coal camp. Gunnison County
Pullman Camp, SE 1/4 sec. 4, T. 10 S., R. 81 W., on northeast side of Mount Massive. Lake County
Puzzle Station, SE 1/4 sec. 6, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., 1 mile southeast of Breckenridge on the D.S.P. & P. R.R. Summit County
Quandary City (Monte Cristo), SE 1/4 sec. 2, T. 8 S., R. 78 W. Summit County
Quartzville, 1871, NE 1/4 sec. 23, T. 8 S., R. 78 W., on Quartzville Creek in a "cup" in the mountains at timberline. Eberhart (1959, p. 127) said that the site had an informal Post Office. Nearby Sweet Home mine is a source of large beautiful rhodochrosite crystals. Park County
Quinns Spur (see Biglow). Pitkin County
Radium, P.O., 1906, NW 1/4 sec. 27, T. 1 S., R. 82 W., formerly on the D. & S.L. Ry., later in 1947 on the D. & R.G. R.R, along the Colorado River. Grand County
Ragged Mountain, P.O., 1919, NW 1/4 sec. 12, T. 11 S., R. 90 W., 0.5 mile east of Muddy Creek. Gunnison County
Range Station, SE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 3 S., R. 86 W. Eagle County
Rathbone, P.O., 1891, NE 1/4 sec. 21, T. 9 S., R. 85 W., on the C.M. Ry. near Woody Creek along the Roaring Fork River. Pitkin County
Raven, P.O., 1898, middle sec. 24, T. 7 S., R. 92 W., on West Divide Creek. Garfield County
Recen (Kokomo, P.O., 1879), NE 1/4 sec. 23, T. 7 S., R. 79 W., on D. & R.G. R.R. along Tenmile Creek. An important placer mining and lumber camp that adjoined Kokomo. Summit County
Red Canon, before 1964, NW 1/4 sec. 26, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., about 5 miles southeast of Glenwood Springs along the D. & R.G. R.R. Garfield County
Red Cliff, 1870, P.O., 1880, SE 1/4 sec. 19, T. 6 S., R. 80 W., a regal settlement with silver miners, had an opera house and a brass band, at the junction of Turkey Creek and the Eagle River. First county seat of Eagle County; later on, the D. & R.G. R.R. built along Eagle River. In 1893, because of the fall in silver prices, Red Cliff had a serious slump in business. In September 1879, when news of the Meeker Massacre reached Red Cliff, the miners built a log fort for protection from any harassment by the Ute Indians. A scouting party found no Indians, so the camp resumed normal activities. Eagle County
Red Mountain Inn, NW 1/4 sec. 30, T. 11 S., R. 81 W., near Everett on the stage road over Independence Pass, a road house on the Twin Lakes toll road. Lake County
Redstone, P.O., 1898, NE 1/4 sec. 20, T. 10 S., R. 88 W., on the Crystal River Railway along the Crystal River. Redstone was where coke was made from the coal that was mined at Coal basin. The town was started by J.G. Osgood, who was the organizer of the Colorado Fuel Company, later the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company. Osgood built Cleveholm, a 42–room manor house, a 40–room inn, and a model village for his coke workers. Pitkin County
Resurrection mines, NE 1/4 sec. 21, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., in Evans Gulch at the ends of D. & R.G. rail lines as shown on 1913 USGS topographic map, a few miles east of Leadville in the California Gulch Mining District. Lake County
Resurrection Town, sec. 21, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., railroad station on the Leadville to Ibex Line. Lake County
Rex, 1886, SW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., just north of Gilman; the town was built on and in a cliff along the Eagle River. Eagle County
Rex Station, SW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., a D. & R.G.W. R.R. station in the Eagle Valley, connected to Gilman by an aerial tram and stairs. Eagle County
Rifle, P.O., 1884, secs. 9 and 16, T. 6 S., R. 93 W., a stock–raising area along D. & R.G. R.R. along the Colorado River. Garfield County
Rifle Cow Camp, NE 1/4 sec. 36, T. 3 S., R. 93 W., on Butler Creek. Garfield County
Rifle Falls State Recreation Area, SE l/4 sec. 27, T. 4 S., R. 92 W., 9 miles north of the Colorado River. Garfield County
Riland, P.O., 1913, NE 1/4 sec. 16, T. 3 S., R. 87 W., 10 miles northeast of Carbonate City on Sweetwater Creek. There were several locations of the P.O. along Sweetwater Creek for about 2.5 miles northwest of the Garfield and Eagle Counties line. Garfield County
Rio Blanco, P.O., 1950, NE 1/4 sec. 4, T. 4 S., R. 94 W., just north of Piceance Creek, Rio Blanco is on the west flank of the Grand Hogback monocline. Rio Blanco County
Riverside, 1881, NW 1/4 sec. 21, T. 6 S., R. 93 W., just south of Rifle, now has an airport. Garfield County
Roaring Fork City, 1879, P.O., 1889, center of sec. 12, T. 10 S., R. 85 W., one cabin was used as the Post Office (Wentworth, 1950, p. 26), one mile west of Aspen, a building promotion, but no city was built. Pitkin County
Robinson (Ten Mile, Ten Mile City, Robinson's Camp, Summit City), 1880, P.O., 1887, SE 1/4 sec. 27 or NW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 7 S., R. 79 W., a tent and cabin settlement that became Robinson's Camp, served by D. & R.G. and D.S.P. & P. railroads by 1881, a flourishing silver mining camp in the 1880s but faded by 1890, the town is now buried under the tailings from the Climax Molybdenum mine. Summit County
Rock, 1883–1884, SE 1/4 sec. 9, T. 4 S., R. 78 W., on the Blue River south of Naomi. Summit County
Rock Creek Station, NW 1/4 sec. 13, T. 6 S., R. 81 W., across the Eagle River from Gilman. Eagle County
Rocky Point, NW 1/4 sec. 8, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., on D.S.P. & P. R.R. Summit County
Rogers Spur, NW 1/4 sec. 20, T. 9 S, R. 81 W., the Colorado Midland Railway, near crossing of the Continental Divide (see figure 3). Lake County
Rose Spur, NW 1/4 sec. 25, T. 8 S., R. 86 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. Pitkin County
Roudebush, P.O., 1880, SE 1/4 sec. 34, T. 7 S., R. 80 W., a gold camp during the early 1880s. Eagle County
Ruby (pre–1880 to 1890s), NE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 12 S., R. 83 W., a ruby silver and gold camp in Lincoln Gulch with somewhat difficult access to a railroad or to a smelter. Pitkin County
Ruedi, P.O., 1889, SW 1/4 sec. 8, T. 8 S., R. 84 W., on the C.M. Ry. along Frying Pan Creek. Eagle County
Rulison, SE 1/4 sec. 25, T. 6 S., R. 95 W., on D. & R.G. R.R. along the Colorado River. Garfield County
Russell, SW 1/4 sec. 14, T. 4 S., R. 83 W., on D. & R.G. R.R. along the Eagle River. Eagle County
Ryan, SE 1/4 NE 1/4 sec. 29, T. 9 S., R. 80 W, a small station on the Eagle River Branch of the D. & R.G. R.R. almost 1 mile north of Malta. Lake County
Ryan Station, NW 1/4 sec. 10, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., nearly same locality as St. Kevins on the D. & R.G. R.R. along the Arkansas River. Lake County
Saco Ranch, NW 1/4 sec. 24, T. 8 S., R. 87 W., on East Sopris Creek. Pitkin County
Sacramento, NW 1/4 sec. 4, T. 10 S., R. 78 W., on Sacramento Gulch west of Fairplay. Park County
Sacramento City, one of the first settlements in the middle part of California Gulch, about 3 miles from the Arkansas River. Sacramento City later was consolidated with Oro City. Correct location probably was in the NE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., on the south side of Front Street between Spruce and Pine. Lake County
St. Kevin, P.O., 1886, SW 1/4 sec. 6, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., north of Turquoise Lake near Amity, originally Sowbelly Gulch (Blair, 1980, p. 63). Lake County
St. Kevins, NW 1/4 sec. 10, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., miners camp 2 miles northeast of Turquoise Lake, same location as Ryans Station. Lake County
Satank, P.O., 1882, SE 1/4 sec. 29, T. 7 S., R. 88 W., along C.M. Ry. on Crystal River. Garfield County
Sayres Gulch, 1865, NE 1/4 sec. 10, T. 12 S., R. 82 W., a rich placer strike. Chaffee County
Schofield, 1879, P.O., 1880, SW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 12 S., R. 86 W., a mining camp in an area with poor access and low–grade ore. Gunnison County
Scholl, P.O., 1901, SE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 1 S., R. 79 W., on the east flank of the Williams Fork Mountains on Battle Creek. Grand County
Seaton's Ranch, on east side of Independence Pass, location unknown. Lake(?) County
Sellar (Meadows), P.O., 1888, a station and logging camp, SE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 8 S., R. 83 W., on C.M. Ry. Pitkin County
Seven Castles, P.O., 1913, NE 1/4 sec. 11, T. 8 S., R. 86 W., on C.M. Ry. at Castles Station on Frying Pan Creek. Eagle County
Sewell (Cervera, Manalta, Thompson), NW 1/4 sec. 27, T. 8 S., R. 88 W., a railroad town on Crystal River & San Juan Railroad, along the Crystal River. Pitkin County
Shanty Town. According to Sam McGeorge of the Railroad Museum in Leadville, this place was in California Gulch, just west of McWethy Drive in the SW1/4 NW1/4 sec. 26, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Sheephorn, P.O., 1895, NW 1/4 sec. 6, T. 2 S., R. 81 W., east of State Bridge on Sheephorn Creek. Sheephorn Post Office had several locations in the same township. Eagle County
Sheephorn, P.O., 1916, SW 1/4 NW 1/4 sec. 16, T. 2 S., R. 81 W., on Sheephorn Creek. Eagle County
Sherman, P.O., 1890, NW 1/4 sec. 26, T. 4 S., R. 84 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R., on the Eagle River. Eagle County
Sherman (see El Jebel), NE 1/4 sec. 3, T. 8 S., R. 87 W., on C.M. Ry. along Roaring Fork River. Eagle County
Sherwood, SE 1/4 sec. 8, T. 4 S., R. 83 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R at the confluence of the Eagle River and Milk Creek. Eagle County
Shoshone Station, P.O., 1907, NW 1/4 sec. 30, T. 5 S., R. 87 W., on D. & R.G. R.R. in Glenwood Canyon along Colorado River. Garfield County
Siloam Springs, 1889(?), SW 1/4 sec. 12, T. 5 S., R. 87 W., consisted of a bath house, log hotel with dining room, a D. & R.G. R.R. depot, and some log dwellings (Urquhart, 1967, p. 16), at east end of Glenwood Canyon. Eagle County
Silt, P.O., 1898 (originally Ferguson, 1887), NW 1/4 sec. 10, T. 6 S., R. 92 W., a cattle and potato shipping station on the D. & R.G. R.R. along the Colorado River. Garfield County
Silverthorne, P.O., 1962, NE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 5 S., R. 78 W., on the Blue River. Summit County
Silverthorne Flats, SW 1/4 sec. 12, T. 5 S., R. 78 W., this place and the town of Silverthorne both were on the Blue River Extension that extended north from Dillon down the Blue River about 6 miles to the end of track (Denver & Rio Grande Railroad). The track was removed in 1923. Summit County
Sixty One Camp, probably a mining camp during the 1870s(?), location unknown, but probably near Leadville
Slabtown, probably 1860(?), NE 1/4 NE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. (was part of early Leadville's Carbonate Camp). Apparently Slabtown was at essentially the same place as old Oro City and Sacramento City, just north of California Gulch, apparently a short distance west of Harrison Avenue and just east of Spruce Street where the C.M. Ry. entered the south edge of Leadville. Griswold and Griswold (1996, p. 214) stated that "Slabtown was the future Babylon, founded by Major James, situated about 3/4 mile west of Harrison Avenue, was the city in 1877, and old Oro was the Pilgrim's Mecca." Slabtown probably was named for shacks built of wooden slabs. A mercantile house was started there by Charles Mater in 1877. "The site later became part of Chestnut Street, the first and busiest street in Leadville" (Griswold and Griswold, 1996). Lake County
Slate Creek, SE 1/4 sec. 18, T. 3 S., R. 78 W., on Slate Creek west of the junction with Blue River. Summit County
Sloane (Sloss), NW 1/4 sec. 9, T. 8 S., R. 85 W., on C.M. Ry. along Frying Pan Creek. Eagle County
Sloss (Sloane), P.O., 1909, NE 1/4 sec. 9, T. 8 S., R. 85 W., a cattle camp. Eagle County
Smith Spur, center sec. 6, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., on D.S.P. & P. Ry. along Illinois Gulch. Summit County
Snider Quarry Spur, NW 1/4 sec. 13, T. 8 S., R. 85 W., on the C.M. Ry. along the Frying Pan Creek. Pitkin County
Snowden, P.O., 1890, NE 1/4 sec. 21, T. 10 S., R. 80 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. along the Arkansas River. Lake County
Snowmass, 1889, P.O., 1901, NW 1/4 sec. 27, T. 8 S., R. 86 W., on the C.M. Ry. where Snowmass Creek joins the Roaring Fork River. Pitkin County
Snowmass, SE 1/4 sec. 9, T. 9 S., R. 86 W. Pitkin County
Snowmass Village, pre–1983, SW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 10 S., R. 86 W., along Brush Creek. Pitkin County
Soda Springs, 1876, SW 1/4 sec. 25, T. 3 S., R. 81 W., on a southeast tributary of Soda Creek. Eagle County
Soda Springs, P.O., 1879, NE 1/4 sec. 25, T. 9 S., R. 81 W., was the most popular resort near Leadville. (Popular for sulfur, iron, and soda springs.) A horse railroad was chartered in 1881 to run from Leadville to the Soda Springs (Crofutt, 1885, p. 143). Mount Massive Hotel provided comfortable accommodations and diversions for the guests. Lake County
Solitude, SE 1/4 sec. 19, T. 6 S., R. 78 W., at D.S.P. & P. R.R. station at old Wheeler. Summit County
Sopris, NW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 7 S., R. 88 W., on C.M. Ry. west of the Roaring Fork River. Garfield County
South Canon Coal Company, P.O., 1905, SW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 6 S., R. 90 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. along the Colorado River. Garfield County
South Evans (Tollhouse), SE 1/4 sec. 15, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., a community 6 miles east of Leadville in Evans Gulch south of Mosquito Pass in the Mosquito Range. Lake County
Sowbelly Gulch (Sowbelly or St. Kevin Mining District), on east flank of Mt. Massive. Lake County
Sparkhill, P.O., Feb. 18, 1882, NE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 11 S., R. 83 W., on the Roaring Fork River. Rogers (1967) recorded "Sparkill" (Sparkhill) as 2 miles east of Independence mining camp at Independence Pass on the Roaring Fork River. Pitkin County
Spring Gulch (Jerome Park), P.O., 1891, SE 1/4 sec. 22, T. 8 S., R. 89 W., at south end of Colorado Midland Railway line. Pitkin County
Spruce Creek, SE 1/4 sec. 15, T. 5 S., R. 87 W., on the D. & R.G.W. R.R. along the Colorado River. Garfield County
Squaw Creek, P.O., 1884, SE 1/4 sec. 36, T. 4 S., R. 83 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. along the Eagle River near Allen and French Gulch. Eagle County
Stapleton Spur, NW 1/4 sec. 2, T. 10 S., R. 85 W., on C.M. Ry. Pitkin County
Starr Placer, NW corner sec. 25, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., in California Gulch near Boughtown, operated during the 1860s and 1870s by Tom Starr. Lake County
State Bridge, P.O., 1909, NW corner sec. 25, T. 2 S., R. 83 W., at a large three–span bridge across the Colorado River, an important stage stop on the D. & S.L. Ry., mail went to the town of Bond. Eagle County
Sterling City (see Mosquito). Sterling applied unsuccessfully in 1862 for a permit for a Post Office. Park County
Stiles, SW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 11 S., R. 78 W., on east side of Weston Pass. Park County
St. Kevin, P.O., 1886, SW 1/4 sec. 6, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., north of Turquoise Lake near Amity, originally Sowbelly Gulch (Blair, 1980, p. 63). Lake County
St. Kevins, NW 1/4 sec. 10, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., miners camp 2 miles northeast of Turquoise Lake, same location as Ryans Station. Lake County
Strauss quarry, center sec. 36, T. 11 S., R. 88 W., slightly northeast of Yule quarry. Gunnison County
Stringtown, SE 1/4 sec. 27, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., in California Gulch between Shantytown and Bucktown near the giant Arkansas Valley plant and the Great Northern Hotel. Lake County
Stumptown (Stumpftown), 1879, NW 1/4 sec. 21, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., 0.5 mile east of Evansville along Big Evans Gulch. Lake County
Sulphur Spring (see Dotsero), 1880, NE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 5 S., R. 86 W., or NE 1/4 sec. 18, T. 5 S., R. 86 W., at junction of the Colorado and Eagle Rivers. Eagle County
Sulphur Springs, NW 1/4 sec. 2, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., on the D. & R.G.W. R.R. along the Colorado River. Garfield County
Sultana, SW 1/4 sec. 30, T. 6 S., R. 77 W., 1 mile north of Breckenridge (Cram, 1909). Summit County
Summit, 1880s, a D. & R.G. R.R. station near Alicante just south of Fremont Pass. Park County
Sunlight, 1887, P.O., 1897, center sec. 33, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., a former large coal town. Garfield County
Sunlight Junction and Sunlight Coal mine, P.O., 1897, NW 1/4 sec. 26, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., along Fourmile Creek on the C.M. Ry. Garfield County
Swansons, SW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 6 S., R. 77 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. along the Blue River. Summit County
Swedes Gulch mining camp, 1890s (location?), NE 1/4 sec. 7, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., 2 miles north of Colorado Gulch and west of Tennessee Park. Lake County
Sweets Spur, NE 1/4 sec. 30, T. 7 S., R. 88 W., on the C.M. Ry. and along the Roaring Fork River. Garfield County
Swilltown (Schwilltown), P.O., 1875, NE 1/4 sec. 32, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., an early name for Malta, nickname for Ferdinand A. Schwill, the first Leadville postmaster. Lake County
Sylvan Station, SW 1/4 sec. 32, T. 2 S., R. 85 W., on the D. & S.L.W. R.R. along the Colorado River. Eagle County
Tabor City (Taylor City, Halfway House, or Chalk Creek Ranch), P.O., 1879, SE 1/4 sec. 16, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., named for Lieutenant Governor H.A.W. Tabor, a mining camp on Chalk Creek at the base of Buckskin Mountain, 8 miles northeast of Leadville. Lake County
Tacoma, P.O., 1883, NE 1/4 sec. 23, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., 10 miles south of Malta. Lake County
Taylor, P.O., 1882, SW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 7 S., R. 81 W., on Homestake Creek west of Mitchell (Boyd and Carson, 1985). Eagle County
Taylor Creek (Cooper), NW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 8 S., R. 85 W. Eagle County
Tender–Foot Town, probably in the SW 1/4 NE 1/4 sec. 25, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., at Chicken Hill on the southwest slope of Carbonate Hill. Lake County
Ten Mile (Ten Mile City, Robinson, Robinson's Camp, Summit City), P.O., 1879, NW 1/4 sec. 34, T. 7 S., R. 79 W. Summit County
Ten Mile City (Ten Mile Gulch), 1879, SE 1/4 sec. 27, T. 7 S., R. 79 W., a mining and sawmill camp with a smelter, just north of Robinson, along Denver & Rio Grande Railroad, probably was absorbed by Robinson (see previous entry and Robinson). Summit County
Ten Mile Railroad Station, P.O., 1880, possibly same location as either of the previous two entries. Summit County
Tennessee Park, secs. 4 and 5, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., a small mining camp on southern side of Tennessee Pass. Lake County
Tennessee Pass, P.O., 1912, NE 1/4 sec. 15, T. 8 S., R. 80 W., 11 miles south of Red Cliff, a mining camp, south of present–day Cooper Hill ski area. Lake and Eagle Counties
Theisen, P.O., 1909, SE 1/4 sec. 8, T. 1 S., R. 83 W., on Rock Creek along the D. & S.L. Ry. Routt County
Thomas, NE 1/4 sec. 9, T. 9 S., R. 88 W., along the Crystal River north of Janeway. Pitkin County
Thomasville, P.O., 1890, NW 1/4 sec. 18, T. 8 S., R. 83 W., a mine and smelter, now a farming community on C.M. Ry. along Frying Pan Creek. Pitkin County
Thompson (see Sewell), NW 1/4 sec. 27, T. 8 S., R. 88 W., on C.R. & S.J. R.R. along the Crystal River. Garfield County
Three Mile Tank, SE 1/4 sec. 6, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., on the D.S.P. & P. Ry. and L.C. & S. Ry., along East Fork Arkansas River. Lake County
Tigiwon, P.O., 1929, SW 1/4 sec. 22, T. 6 S., R. 81 W. Eagle County
Timberline Town, NE 1/4 sec. 32, T. 8 S., R. 78 W., along Buckskin Creek. Park County
Tintown, 1878, NE 1/4 sec. 23, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., in the north edge of Leadville, had several mills and a large railroad yard. According to Sam McGeorge of the Leadville Railroad Museum, a second community of Tintown was in the eastern part of Poverty Flat in the NE1/4 NW1/4 sec. 24, T. 9 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
Toll Bridges, NW 1/4 sec. 2, T. 11 S., R. 84 W., along Roaring Fork River. Pitkin County
Tollhouse, P.O., 1893, SE 1/4 sec. 15, T. 9 S., R. 79 W., on north side of Bald Mountain, same site as South Evans. Lake County
Tourtelotte, P.O., 1899, NE 1/4 sec. 25, T. 10 S., R. 85 W. Pitkin County
Tourtelotte Park, 1889, SW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 10 S., R. 84 W., a mining camp south of Aspen, reached by an electric tramway, now on a ski run. Pitkin County
Town Pass Siding, SE 1/4 sec. 15, T. 8 S., R. 80 W., on Tennessee Creek south of Tennessee Pass. Lake County
Trappers Lake, pre–1900, secs. 11 and 12, T. 1 S., R. 88 W., a summer resort and sportsman's rendezvous on the shore of the large lake of the same name. Garfield County
Troutville, P.O., 1909, SW 1/4 sec. 23, T. 7 S., R. 83 W., in the headwaters of Lime Creek. Eagle County
Twin Lakes (Dayton), P.O., 1879, NW 1/4 sec. 19, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., a famous resort and summer vacation destination, a major stage and freighter station and mining center. In 1873, Professor John J. Stephenson of the Wheeler military mapping expedition visited here (Kernochan, 1956, p. 183). The town is on the Independence Pass Road, and many other trails led from Twin Lakes into the Sawatch Range. Lake County
Twin Lakes Ranch, NE 1/4 sec. 16, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., on the north side of Twin Lakes. Lake County
Twin Lakes Spur (Twin Lakes Station), Post Office(?), center south 1/2 sec. 24, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., station on C.M. Ry. along the Arkansas River at Waco or Harvard, now Balltown. Lake County
Uneva Lake, NW 1/4 sec. 8, T. 6 S., R. 78 W., along Ten Mile Creek and the D.S.P. & P. R.R. Summit County
Union , SE 1/4 sec. 15, T. 8 S., R. 89 W., on C.M. Ry. along Fourmile Creek. Pitkin County
Ute City, 1879, NE 1/4 sec. 12, T. 10 S., R. 85 W., later called Aspen. Pitkin County
Vail Village, P.O., 1962, SW 1/4 sec. 5, T. 5 S., R. 80 W., named for Vail Pass on highway I–70 along Gore Creek. Now a major ski area and year–round recreational community. Eagle County
Valdoro, SE 1/4 sec. 7, T. 6 S., R. 77 W. (Valdoro is Spanish for valley of gold), along the Swan River north of Breckenridge, Valdoro had a 13–car railroad spur. Summit County
Valdoro Station, NW 1/4 sec. 7, T. 6 S., R. 77 W., a D.S.P. & P. R.R. narrow gauge railroad town on the Blue River. Summit County
Valley Spur, NW 1/4 sec. 26, T. 7 S., R. 88 W., on the C.M. Ry. along the Roaring Fork River. Garfield County
Vega, P.O., 1891, NW 1/4 sec. 6, T. 10 S., R. 93 W., on The Meadows near junction of Park Creek and Plateau Creek. Mesa County
Vicksburg, P.O., 1881, SE 1/4 sec. 18, T. 12 S., R. 80 W., formerly a mining camp, but now a summer resort. Chaffee County
Volcano Station, SW 1/4 sec. 5, T. 1 S., R. 83 W., stop on the D. & S.L. Ry. along Egeria Creek about 2 miles north of Pershing. Routt County
Vulcan Coal Spur, P.O., 1892, NW 1/4 sec. 1, T. 6 S., R. 91 W., on the C.M. Ry. along the Colorado River. Garfield County
Waco, SE 1/4 sec. 24, T. 11 S., R. 80 W., formerly Twin Lakes Station on the Arkansas River. Lake County
Walkers Spur, NW 1/4 sec. 32, T. 9 S., R. 80 W., on the C.M. Ry. along the Arkansas River. Lake County
Washington Spur, NE 1/4 sec. 6, T. 7 S., R. 77 W., on the D.S.P. & P. R.R. near Illinois Gulch. Summit County
Watson, P.O., 1889, NW 1/4 sec. 6, T. 9 S., R. 85 W., on the C.M. Ry. along Roaring Fork River, called Gerbazdale in 1918. Pitkin County
Watts Station, SE 1/4 sec. 16, T. 5 S., R. 81 W., on D. & R.G. line along Eagle River. Eagle County
Weller, NW 1/4 sec. 2, T. 11 S., R. 83 W., on the Roaring Fork River. Pitkin County
West, SW 1/4 sec. 5, T. 5 S., R. 84 W., on D. & R.G. line and highway I–70. Eagle County
West Glenwood, NE 1/4 sec. 5, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., on D. & R.G. line along the Colorado River. Garfield County
Westons Ranch, 1878, NW 1/4 sec. 15, T. 10 S., R. 80 W. Lake County
West Vail, SE 1/4 sec. 11, T. 5 S., R. 81 W., on U.S. Highway 6 along Gore Creek. Eagle County
Wheeler (Solitude), pre–1885, P.O., 1880, SE 1/4 sec. 19, T. 6 S., R. 78 W., a farm, lumber, and ranch center on D.S.P. & P. R.R. at mouth of West Ten Mile Creek. Summit County
Wheeler, SE 1/4 sec. 30, T. 7 S., R. 87 W., on C.M. Ry. along Roaring Fork River. Garfield County
Wheeler Ranger Station, SE 1/4 sec. 19, T. 6 S., R. 78 W., on C. & S. Ry. just north of Copper Mountain. Eagle County
Whiskey Springs, center sec. 1, T. 3 S., R. 83 W., about 9 miles north of Wolcott, stage station and hunters camp. Eagle County
White River Agency, P.O., 1888, NE 1/4 sec. 14, T. 1 S., R. 93 W., this is a few miles southeast of the Old Danford Indian Agency (see main trail map). On White River south of Veatch Gulch. Rio Blanco County
Wilders, NE 1/4 sec. 13, T. 7 S., R. 79 W., on the D. & R.G. line along Tenmile Creek. Summit County
Wilfley Mill, NE 1/4 sec. 26, T. 7 S., R. 79 W., near old Kokomo. Summit County
Willow, SW 1/4 sec. 2, T. 9 S., R. 89 W., on the Aspen & Western Railway on Middle Thompson Creek. Pitkin County
Willowpark, 1913, SW 1/4 sec. 10, T. 11 S., R. 86 W., on the headwaters of Willow Creek, northeast of Maroon Bells. Pitkin County
Winchester, SE 1/4 sec. 19, T. 9 S., R. 77 W., on S.P. & L.S.L. R.R. along Middle Fork South Platte River. Park County
Windy Point, NW 1/4 sec. 15, T. 9 S., R. 81 W., on C.M. Ry. along Lake Fork Creek. Lake County
Wingo, NW 1/4 sec. 21, T. 8 S., R. 86 W., on D. & R.G. R.R. along Roaring Fork River. Pitkin County
Wolcott, P.O., 1889, SW 1/4 sec. 15, T. 4 S., R. 83 W., on the D. & R.G. R.R. along Eagle River. Eagle County
Woody Creek Station, 1890, P.O., 1920, NW 1/4 sec. 9, T. 9 S., R. 85 W., on D. & R.G. R.R. along Roaring Fork River. Pitkin County
Wortman, P.O., 1900, NE 1/4 sec. 14, T. 8 S., R. 79 W., mining camp near Alicante, Post Office was 55 feet north of the railroad tracks. Lake County

Yale Station, 1868, SW 1/4 sec. 31, T. 11 S., R. 79 W. Chaffee County
Yarmony, P.O., 1908, NE 1/4 sec. 18, T. 2 S., R. 82 W., on D. & S.L. Ry. along the Colorado River. Eagle County
Yeoman Park, NW 1/4 sec. 35, T. 6 S., R. 83 W., in headwaters of East Brush Creek. Eagle County
Yule Quarry, SW 1/4 sec. 36, T. 11 S., R. 88 W., on Colorado–Yule Marble Company Electric Line along Yule Creek. Gunnison County
 

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