Possible Chondrodite Found in Ohio?

Sep 17, 2021
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Hey Guys,

First post here. I was digging in my yard about 1 foot down and I found a couple rocks that looks like this. Some are just crystals that look like glass and come attached to a rock. Is this possibly chondrodite? Any help IDing would be awesome! Would be willing to send a small one for free to the one who IDs this rock.

Thanks 6AE69EB2-F97D-4A50-A8DF-ACD8604B4BDA.jpeg
 

invent4hir

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Hi and welcome to TNet. Not sure what you have. I recommend taking/posting some additional photos with a size reference. Also, where in Ohio was it found? This info may help someone ID. Finally if no one IDs, consider posting on Rocks/Gems sub-forum at Rocks/Gems.
 
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Terry Soloman

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Hey Guys,

First post here. I was digging in my yard about 1 foot down and I found a couple rocks that looks like this. Some are just crystals that look like glass and come attached to a rock. Is this possibly chondrodite? Any help IDing would be awesome! Would be willing to send a small one for free to the one who IDs this rock.

Thanks
attachment.php

Most likely your finds are not meteorites. I would contact the geologist at your local college and ask if they would look at your samples. Here are some chondrites from Gold Basin, AZ.
 

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Red-Coat

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Amber maybe?

That was my first thought.

There's nothing about it which suggests it's a chondrite, or any other kind of meteorite.

Ohio's surface geology and exposures are all sedimentary (apart from glacial erratics), so it's not likely to be an igneous rock.

I would suggest vigorously rubbing it to and fro' on something wool or silk. Amber should pick up enough static charge to attract hairs, dust etc. To be sure, get a safety pin (bobby pin), open it up, hold it with a gloved hand and the pin part in a flame until the tip begins to glow, and then press it into an inconspicuous part of the glassy area. Amber will melt and give off a burnt aroma that has an unmistakable tinge of pine trees.

If you don't get a positive on either of those tests, I would think it may be glass and slag-related. It looks to have a conchoidal fracture, which amber has to some extent, but slag glass even more so.

PS: welcome to Tnet
 
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galenrog

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While slag glass is likely based on the images, I have seen many very unusual agatized masses. Collected some petrified wood several years ago that had a similar appearance, so I would not exclude the possibility without closer examination. Still, the simplest answer is usually the correct answer.

Time for more coffee.
 
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