Rechargeable batteries

mindcrime1988

Bronze Member
Apr 17, 2011
1,117
1,432
Wyoming
Detector(s) used
Garrett AT Pro, XP Deus, DetectorPro Headhunter & BlissTool
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
I have used the Energizer Recharge batteries in my AT Pro for many years now and they work excellent. No issues whatsoever and I can get roughly 3 full days of detecting in before I have to recharge them.
 

Attachments

  • Energizer.jpg
    Energizer.jpg
    611 KB · Views: 80

fortaleza

Jr. Member
Jun 15, 2013
78
75
Northern Illinois, Fortaleza Brazil
Detector(s) used
Garrett AT Pro, Tesoro Mojave, Garrett Ace 250, 2 Garrett Pro Pointers gotta have a backup
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I have an AT Pro and I use recharge batteries all the time here in Brazil. I have the eneloop/sanyo charger which is 110/220 volts. I get about 12 to 15 outings at 1 1/2 to 2 hours at a time before they go to 1 bar on battery indicator. No problems with the pro or battery performance. I got the eneloop charging system from Costco about 6 years ago . So I hope this helps your choice.
 
OP
S

SeekerProB

Sr. Member
Nov 16, 2018
315
1,256
South East Alabama
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
Began with Bounty Hunter, Now have AT Pro and AT Max.
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #4
Thank you I appreciate the input. I have realized that I am going through way to many batteries and want to do something better.
 

Charlie P. (NY)

Gold Member
Feb 3, 2006
12,874
16,748
South Central Upstate NY in the foothills of the h
Detector(s) used
Minelab Musketeer Advantage Pro w/8" & 10" DD coils/Fisher F75se(Upgraded to LTD2) w/11" DD, 6.5" concentric & 9.5" NEL Sharpshooter DD coils/Sunray FX-1 Probe & F-Point/Black Widows/Rattler headphone
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
I don't know with an AT Pro, but with some detectors the 1.5v of an Alkaline cell doesn't like to be substituted with the 1.2v of a rechargeable. An Alkaline cell is considered "dead" when it gets below 1.3 volts.

Your detector may always show no "bars" of voltage left even with newly charged rechargeables.

Some are designed from the get-go to use rechargeables and will do fine.
 

Tom Slick

Sr. Member
Jul 21, 2012
427
333
Mesa AZ
Detector(s) used
Minelab Equinox 800, XP Deus & ORX, Makro Multi Kruzer, White's DFX w/BigFoot coil, Tesoro Tiger Shark, Mojave, Fisher F5
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Get the eneloop batteries and don't look back.
 

erte

Full Member
Mar 19, 2017
113
68
Croatia
Detector(s) used
gpx 4800, tdi pro, sov gt/xs, sand shark 10.5'', vaquero
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
eneloop or fujitsu, some say there are fake eneloops being sold on amazon, so get batteries from good source
 

Toecutter

Bronze Member
Nov 30, 2018
2,397
7,285
1880s Michigan
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
XP Deus 2
NOX 800
Garrett at pro
whites id5
radio shack
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
rechargable AA bats are 1.2 or 1.3 volts standerd AA batts are 1.5v, might wanna check recomended voltage
 
Last edited:

Tom Slick

Sr. Member
Jul 21, 2012
427
333
Mesa AZ
Detector(s) used
Minelab Equinox 800, XP Deus & ORX, Makro Multi Kruzer, White's DFX w/BigFoot coil, Tesoro Tiger Shark, Mojave, Fisher F5
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Most all modern detectors have voltage regulators and run on a lower voltage than the combined voltage of the batteries installed. Otherwise, as soon as the batteries lost a little voltage they would quit working or working properly. Your AT Pro will run fine with rechargeable batteries.
 
Oct 5, 2014
31,851
35,381
Massachusetts
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
Garrett: AT Pro, AT Gold & Infinium; Minelab: Explorer SE, II; Simplex; Tesoro: Tejon & Outlaw; White's: V3i
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
I use the RnB Innovations rechargeable for the AT Pro & AT Gold; over 30 hours of use between charges! :occasion14:
 

mh9162013

Full Member
Mar 22, 2019
180
138
KY
Detector(s) used
Fisher Research Labs F2, Equinox 600, Pro-Find 35, & Garrett Carrot.
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
Get the eneloop batteries and don't look back.

+1

They are the original LSD NiMH and can handle high amp draws if you ever need to use them in high-drain devices.
 

mh9162013

Full Member
Mar 22, 2019
180
138
KY
Detector(s) used
Fisher Research Labs F2, Equinox 600, Pro-Find 35, & Garrett Carrot.
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
I agree. Very nice batteries. Make sure you get a good charger too.

Preferably a single channel one so you don't have to charge your batteries in pairs.
 

retrodog

Tenderfoot
Mar 13, 2019
6
3
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
The rechargeable batteries are overall safer for your equipment. In the rare (but has happened to me all to many times) occasion when you leave alkaline batteries in a device long-term, you get leakage. And that leakage regularly causes corrosion to occur. That's why the manufacturers of these detectors tell you to remove the batteries if you are not going to use it for over a month. The problem is, you usually just forget and when you dig it back out after a year or two, the damage has been done. The rechargeable cells are dry. They do not leak. Well I haven't had one leak anyway. So there's that.

I like the Sanyo Eneloops. The high capacity ones have better run time than regular alkaline batteries. They also have a higher instantaneous current output. Well at least they used to. I have no idea what new alkaline technologies have come out recently.
 

NGE

Silver Member
May 27, 2008
3,505
117
S.E. Michigan
Detector(s) used
Etrac, Explorer XS II, Fisher 1266-X
Primary Interest:
Other
Tom Slick. got ya beat on years detecting, I started in 1960. And I still hunt and am 69 now.
 

Monte

Jr. Member
Jun 5, 2008
28
25
Vale, Oregon
Detector(s) used
Nokta Impact (2), FORS Relic (3), FORS CoRe (2)
Makro Racer 2
Tesoro Vaquero, Bandido II µMAX, Silver Sabre µMAX & Mojave
Makro and Nokta Pinpointers
Killer-B 'Hornet' headphones
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
SeekerProB said:
I have realized that I am going through way to many batteries and want to do something better.
You have me wondering what batteries you have been using with your AT Pro? I also wonder what you consider to be "way too many batteries" related to how much detecting time. A long-period of detecting day-after-day, or a combination of days when you only detect for ±2 hours? Do you use headphones which can help reduce a certain amount of the battery drain?

I've been at this great sport for well over half-a-century, and when I was younger I put in many long search periods. My days off I was frequently spending full days working Relic Hunting sites, or if limited to Coin Hunting urban locations I was still doing 8 to 10 hours a day. Up until about two decades ago I was frequently testing all sorts of brands of Regular, Heavy Duty and Alkaline batteries, and during the mid-to-late '80s I found a few brands of Heavy Duty batteries that lasted quite long, and cost-wise were more affordable than many Alkaline batteries.

Most of the rechargeable batteries around were NiCad and quality Alkaline batteries way out-lasted the NiCad and were more affordable, and easily available. By the latter '90s we saw more metal detectors trending to Tone ID and Target ID and other functions like backlighted displays that would draw more battery power. More digital designed detectors, but that didn't seem to lengthen battery life. Instead it's been more the opposite.

If I only had one detector, and that was all that used AA batteries, I might just power it up with the Eneloop rechargeable batteries I have on-hand, but will likely sell them. I got them with a detector purchase and used them for maybe 6 hours to compare the drain-rate against some Alkaline batteries I was comparing, then put them away with the charger.

In my Regular-Use Detector Outfit I have two Tesoro's and a Teknetics Omega 8000 that require 1 9-Volt battery each. But I need a supply of AA Alkaline batteries on-hand for most of my detectors: 2-each for my 2 Fisher F44's, 4-each for my 2 Nokta FORS CoRe and 2 FORS Relic and a Teknetics T2+, and 8 for my White's MXT All-Pro. In addition, I have flashlights that are AA powered as well: 3-each for the one at my desk, 4-each for one in my 'outdoor' closet and one in one vehicle, 9-each for the one in my critter-hunting gear, another in my bedroom and a 3rd in my living room, and 9-each in my emergency-use flashlight. Also, two new lights in my Emergency Supply Tote that take 4-each and 6-each.

I also need AA batteries for my Blood Pressure monitors, emergency radio and probably something else that doesn't come to mind. Oh, 3-each for the two lanterns, one that's kept in my first aid tote and another that's in my TV room. I also have two flashlights that are rechargeable with Lithium batteries, three from Duracell that require 'C' cells, and I need AAA alkaline batteries for my GMRS radios, 3 smaller flashlights I have located around the house and 7 or 8 brand new ones in my Emergency Supply Tote.

But we're only talking about AA Alkaline batteries to power our detectors, and other gear, and in my Emergency Supply Tote I have another container, my Battery Tote. In there I have other batteries, but my biggest supply is 745, at least weeks count, of AA Alkaline Batteries. I don't need Rechargeable batteries with all my power-required sources. Besides, my detectors provide me with very good run-time with decent Alkaline Batteries, and they are easily available to keep the operating cost low.

My favorite AA alkaline batteries are Duracell, but the same maker also produces the Kirkland house brand for Costco at a much lower retail price. A 3rd battery that is affordable and works well for me are the ones I buy at Albertson's grocery. A 60-pack costs a little under $11. At $10.95 a pack that amounts to 18¼¢ per battery, so to fill an 8-AA Alkaline battery system it only comes to $1.46. I usually get ± 40 hours of operating time, but let's say your detector only gave you 20 hours of service. That would end up costing less than 7½¢ per hour, and if that's not cheap enough to afford a decent Alkaline battery at an affordable price, another hobby might be better.

And that's figuring it with an 8-AA powered detector only providing 20 hours of service. I only have one of those models right now. I have 5 workhorse detectors that only require 4-AA's each, and all of them provide well over 20 hours of run-time each, easily, so my get-serious hunting is costing me no more than 3¾¢ per-hour.

And some of those 745 brand new packs of AA Alkaline batteries might not work as long as a Duracell or Kirkland or other top maker, but they have also met the run-times I mentioned and I buy them on sale in 36 or 48 packs making each battery cost 10½¢ to under 14¢ each.

Sorry to ramble, but I use a lot of AA batteries so I am cost efficient, keep an ample supply, and use brands that hold up well in my detectors and other devices. Either your Garrett AT Pro is a power-hungry device, or you are not using a decent Alkaline battery if you're having issues with short battery life. So, either get a different detector, change to a better Alkaline battery, or go with a Rechargeable battery. But keep in mind that if your unit is going through good Alkalines quickly, then you're going to be removing and recharging the other batteries frequently.

Therefore, my suggestions if you want to go rechargeable are #1.. the RnB batteries or #2.. the individual Eneloop.

Monte
 

retrodog

Tenderfoot
Mar 13, 2019
6
3
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
You have me wondering what batteries you have been using with your AT Pro? I also wonder what you consider to be "way too many batteries" related to how much detecting time. A long-period of detecting day-after-day, or a combination of days when you only detect for ±2 hours? Do you use headphones which can help reduce a certain amount of the battery drain?

I've been at this great sport for well over half-a-century, and when I was younger I put in many long search periods. My days off I was frequently spending full days working Relic Hunting sites, or if limited to Coin Hunting urban locations I was still doing 8 to 10 hours a day. Up until about two decades ago I was frequently testing all sorts of brands of Regular, Heavy Duty and Alkaline batteries, and during the mid-to-late '80s I found a few brands of Heavy Duty batteries that lasted quite long, and cost-wise were more affordable than many Alkaline batteries.

Most of the rechargeable batteries around were NiCad and quality Alkaline batteries way out-lasted the NiCad and were more affordable, and easily available. By the latter '90s we saw more metal detectors trending to Tone ID and Target ID and other functions like backlighted displays that would draw more battery power. More digital designed detectors, but that didn't seem to lengthen battery life. Instead it's been more the opposite.

If I only had one detector, and that was all that used AA batteries, I might just power it up with the Eneloop rechargeable batteries I have on-hand, but will likely sell them. I got them with a detector purchase and used them for maybe 6 hours to compare the drain-rate against some Alkaline batteries I was comparing, then put them away with the charger.

In my Regular-Use Detector Outfit I have two Tesoro's and a Teknetics Omega 8000 that require 1 9-Volt battery each. But I need a supply of AA Alkaline batteries on-hand for most of my detectors: 2-each for my 2 Fisher F44's, 4-each for my 2 Nokta FORS CoRe and 2 FORS Relic and a Teknetics T2+, and 8 for my White's MXT All-Pro. In addition, I have flashlights that are AA powered as well: 3-each for the one at my desk, 4-each for one in my 'outdoor' closet and one in one vehicle, 9-each for the one in my critter-hunting gear, another in my bedroom and a 3rd in my living room, and 9-each in my emergency-use flashlight. Also, two new lights in my Emergency Supply Tote that take 4-each and 6-each.

I also need AA batteries for my Blood Pressure monitors, emergency radio and probably something else that doesn't come to mind. Oh, 3-each for the two lanterns, one that's kept in my first aid tote and another that's in my TV room. I also have two flashlights that are rechargeable with Lithium batteries, three from Duracell that require 'C' cells, and I need AAA alkaline batteries for my GMRS radios, 3 smaller flashlights I have located around the house and 7 or 8 brand new ones in my Emergency Supply Tote.

But we're only talking about AA Alkaline batteries to power our detectors, and other gear, and in my Emergency Supply Tote I have another container, my Battery Tote. In there I have other batteries, but my biggest supply is 745, at least weeks count, of AA Alkaline Batteries. I don't need Rechargeable batteries with all my power-required sources. Besides, my detectors provide me with very good run-time with decent Alkaline Batteries, and they are easily available to keep the operating cost low.

My favorite AA alkaline batteries are Duracell, but the same maker also produces the Kirkland house brand for Costco at a much lower retail price. A 3rd battery that is affordable and works well for me are the ones I buy at Albertson's grocery. A 60-pack costs a little under $11. At $10.95 a pack that amounts to 18¼¢ per battery, so to fill an 8-AA Alkaline battery system it only comes to $1.46. I usually get ± 40 hours of operating time, but let's say your detector only gave you 20 hours of service. That would end up costing less than 7½¢ per hour, and if that's not cheap enough to afford a decent Alkaline battery at an affordable price, another hobby might be better.

And that's figuring it with an 8-AA powered detector only providing 20 hours of service. I only have one of those models right now. I have 5 workhorse detectors that only require 4-AA's each, and all of them provide well over 20 hours of run-time each, easily, so my get-serious hunting is costing me no more than 3¾¢ per-hour.

And some of those 745 brand new packs of AA Alkaline batteries might not work as long as a Duracell or Kirkland or other top maker, but they have also met the run-times I mentioned and I buy them on sale in 36 or 48 packs making each battery cost 10½¢ to under 14¢ each.

Sorry to ramble, but I use a lot of AA batteries so I am cost efficient, keep an ample supply, and use brands that hold up well in my detectors and other devices. Either your Garrett AT Pro is a power-hungry device, or you are not using a decent Alkaline battery if you're having issues with short battery life. So, either get a different detector, change to a better Alkaline battery, or go with a Rechargeable battery. But keep in mind that if your unit is going through good Alkalines quickly, then you're going to be removing and recharging the other batteries frequently.

Therefore, my suggestions if you want to go rechargeable are #1.. the RnB batteries or #2.. the individual Eneloop.

Monte

I'm using the rechargeable batteries so that some poor schmuck doesn't end up having to dig up all my used AA batteries 10 years from now.

j/k
 

Bottlecapbill

Full Member
Feb 4, 2014
145
94
Sault St. Marie , Ontario Canada
Detector(s) used
AT PRO International, Blisstool V3, Makro Multi Kruzer
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I never used rechargeables on my machine, but I did use recharge 9 volts on my pinpointer. What I found is that the rechargeable 9 volts were expensive and would only last about a season(sometimes less) or so before they died totally. When I tallied up the cost of the rechargeable 9 volts(two sets needed to keep one ready at all times), vs the cost of alkaline 9 volts over a season, I found there wasn't much difference in cost, if I was just smart about buying alkalines on sale and in bulk. Now obviously 9 volts are more pricey than AA's so it's a slightly different market but I urge everyone to keep track of the costs. I suspect an occasional hunter will do fine with good rechargeables but if you hunt a LOT the cost vs pain in the ass factor may not balance out for you, since rechargeables don't last forever. Either way, make sure you always carry alkaline backups! When the rechargeables die.......they die suddenly and can ruin a hunt if you don't have a backup plan.
 

retrodog

Tenderfoot
Mar 13, 2019
6
3
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Please remember to attach an insulator to the top of an exposed 9V battery. A piece of tape or the thumb of a latex glove both work well. They can start a fire in a backpack if they touch a conductor. Personal experience here. An old GF of mine threw one in to her backpack pocket to have a spare. She also had change in that pocket. And some other stuff that would burn easily. After it was all over, the thing looked like it had been hit with a phaser blast. I told her it would have been a lot more appropriate if it had been a red backpack.
 

mh9162013

Full Member
Mar 22, 2019
180
138
KY
Detector(s) used
Fisher Research Labs F2, Equinox 600, Pro-Find 35, & Garrett Carrot.
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
The rechargeable batteries are overall safer for your equipment. In the rare (but has happened to me all to many times) occasion when you leave alkaline batteries in a device long-term, you get leakage. And that leakage regularly causes corrosion to occur. That's why the manufacturers of these detectors tell you to remove the batteries if you are not going to use it for over a month. The problem is, you usually just forget and when you dig it back out after a year or two, the damage has been done. The rechargeable cells are dry. They do not leak. Well I haven't had one leak anyway. So there's that.

I like the Sanyo Eneloops. The high capacity ones have better run time than regular alkaline batteries. They also have a higher instantaneous current output. Well at least they used to. I have no idea what new alkaline technologies have come out recently.

I believe they're now Panasonic Eneloops (still just as good, if not better). As for their high capacity ones (they go by "Pro" designation, I think and are black), they don't have the cycle life or internal resistance that's as good as the "standard" white Eneloops. They're still perfectly capable in metal detectors, though.
 

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top