Sea Glass = Bottles Question

HI-McDunnogh

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On shores where a lot of sea glass can be found, is that usually a good indication that whole/intact bottles can be found near by off shore.

I know a spot on the Chesapeake Bay here in VA where you can find sea glass by the handful but have never gone looking for whole bottles. Is there a coralation between the two?

Thanks for the help!
 

UnderMiner

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Underwater in the silt you will find the intact 100+ yo bottles, but not usually washed up on the shore with the sea glass, the sea glass unfortunately is made of those unlucky bottles.

If you want to find 100+ yo bottles the "easy way" without diving for them, I would suggest waiting for low tide and venturing into some mudflats. Use google maps to find mudflats, if you can see old pilings in the mud I can almost guarantee you will find 100+ bottles in there. The mud preserves glass much better than sand and sometimes they come out just as shiny as the day they went in - without even a scratch!

There are types of rubber boots designed specifically for mud. I would suggest investing in a pair. Very easy to get stuck in the mud and lose your boots when you're new to it. I also wear two - three pairs of socks for insulation and so your feet are more secure inside (wouldn't want to accidentally lose a boot in the mud a mile from civilization).
 

WhitesGuy67

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Underwater in the silt you will find the intact 100+ yo bottles, but not usually washed up on the shore with the sea glass, the sea glass unfortunately is made of those unlucky bottles.

If you want to find 100+ yo bottles the "easy way" without diving for them, I would suggest waiting for low tide and venturing into some mudflats. Use google maps to find mudflats, if you can see old pilings in the mud I can almost guarantee you will find 100+ bottles in there. The mud preserves glass much better than sand and sometimes they come out just as shiny as the day they went in - without even a scratch!

There are types of rubber boots designed specifically for mud. I would suggest investing in a pair. Very easy to get stuck in the mud and lose your boots when you're new to it. I also wear two - three pairs of socks for insulation and so your feet are more secure inside (wouldn't want to accidentally lose a boot in the mud a mile from civilization).
good advice on the google maps.. Ive used the NYPL digital collections website for my neck of the woods.
I have also hunted areas with old pilings with great success. The NYPL website is great for NYC areas especially coast line photos.
 
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HI-McDunnogh

HI-McDunnogh

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Underwater in the silt you will find the intact 100+ yo bottles, but not usually washed up on the shore with the sea glass, the sea glass unfortunately is made of those unlucky bottles.

If you want to find 100+ yo bottles the "easy way" without diving for them, I would suggest waiting for low tide and venturing into some mudflats. Use google maps to find mudflats, if you can see old pilings in the mud I can almost guarantee you will find 100+ bottles in there. The mud preserves glass much better than sand and sometimes they come out just as shiny as the day they went in - without even a scratch!

There are types of rubber boots designed specifically for mud. I would suggest investing in a pair. Very easy to get stuck in the mud and lose your boots when you're new to it. I also wear two - three pairs of socks for insulation and so your feet are more secure inside (wouldn't want to accidentally lose a boot in the mud a mile from civilization).

Big thanks, UnderMiner. I appreciate the info. and insight.

When you say pilings, you're speaking of where a dock/pier use to be correct? This site has a bunch of them. Are you using google maps to spot pilings or mud flats? I'm a bit confused about that part.

The water where I'd be searching would primarily be thigh to waist level high. Is the best method for digging while diving just using yours hands to scoop, or would something like a garden spade help?

Appreciate your help!
 

UnderMiner

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Big thanks, UnderMiner. I appreciate the info. and insight.

When you say pilings, you're speaking of where a dock/pier use to be correct? This site has a bunch of them. Are you using google maps to spot pilings or mud flats? I'm a bit confused about that part.

The water where I'd be searching would primarily be thigh to waist level high. Is the best method for digging while diving just using yours hands to scoop, or would something like a garden spade help?

Appreciate your help!
I look for both, if you see pilings from old piers in the mud that's the best of both worlds as it means at some time in the past people were there and likely dropped bottles into the mud.

In terms of digging, it really depends on the consistency of the medium you're digging through, if it's more fine sand/silt I would actually suggest using an old lacrosse stick - just replace the netting with galvanised chicken wire - this makes it like a cross between a sieve and a shovel. This is especially convenient if you're digging under water as it has a long reach. I have actually used this tecnique in the Chesapeake bay specifically to hunt for fossils in up to 5 feet of water. Should work for bottles as well. Usually you won't have to dig too much for bottles as they will typically be either sitting on the surface or embedded just slightly in the sea floor.
51POZETIYwL._AC_SX425_.jpg
 
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HI-McDunnogh

HI-McDunnogh

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I look for both, if you see pilings from old piers in the mud that's the best of both worlds as it means at some time in the past people were there and likely dropped bottles into the mud.

In terms of digging, it really depends on the consistency of the medium you're digging through, if it's more fine sand/silt I would actually suggest using an old lacrosse stick - just replace the netting with galvanised chicken wire - this makes it like a cross between a sieve and a shovel. This is especially convenient if you're digging under water as it has a long reach. I have actually used this tecnique in the Chesapeake bay specifically to hunt for fossils in up to 5 feet of water. Should work for bottles as well. Usually you won't have to dig too much for bottles as they will typically be either sitting on the surface or embedded just slightly in the sea floor. View attachment 2006560

This has been a huge help! Big thanks for your time.

Now just need a little warmer weather!
 

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