Secrets of the Lost Confederate Gold = As told by the talking Trees.

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franklin

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Here is a story I did on Dent's Run. It will be out on a blogsite soon.
Dent's Run Elk County, Pa..jpg
Dent's Run Elk County, Pa.2.jpg
 

GoDeep

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Franklin, What cemetery is that tree on the book cover in? Edit: Nevermind, found it.

It appears to be a fairly "young" tree. My precursory search shows back in 1955 it wasn't very big (If even there yet at that time). So it woudn't have existed anytime near the Civil war period. I'll search some more, i should be able to find some photo's back to the 1930's.

Edit: After further research, i found the very tree you have on your cover photo. In 1955 it was tiny, probably only 10-15 years or so old, so that tree is from around approximately 1940 at the earliest, so it is impossible for those signs to be KGC signs (or any signs) from around the Civil war Era.
 
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franklin

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Franklin, What cemetery is that tree on the book cover in? Edit: Nevermind, found it.

It appears to be a fairly "young" tree. My precursory search shows back in 1955 it wasn't very big (If even there yet at that time). So it woudn't have existed anytime near the Civil war period. I'll search some more, i should be able to find some photo's back to the 1930's.

Edit: After further research, i found the very tree you have on your cover photo. In 1955 it was tiny, probably only 10-15 years or so old, so that tree is from around approximately 1940 at the earliest, so it is impossible for those signs to be KGC signs (or any signs) from around the Civil war Era.
I do not know what you have found and what you are talking about? That tree is 335 years old. There are carvings on it from 1830's to 1887. I found a larger tree older than this one that has carvings on it from the 1730's when the Virginia and North Carolina lines were surveyed. So don't give me any photos or tree dating by experts. I know what I have found and it has been checked out thoroughly.
 

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Easy enough to solve this......Lets see a pix (of that tree GoDeep refers to in post 22)
And Franklin refers to in post 23............
 

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Think I drove by this cemetery 2 weeks ago on my way to Sandbridge Va.
 

dognose

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I understand THAT tree could not be cut down. But many trees do not last 150 plus years.
 

GoDeep

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That tree is 335 years old. So don't give me any photos or tree dating by experts. I know what I have found and it has been checked out thoroughly.

Why wouldn't you want photos and dating by experts? The tree pictured in the Danville National Cemetery you put on your book cover is only about 80 years old.

You said you had it "checked out thoroughly", by whom was it checked out and it's age verified?

I'll put them together here shortly and post them up, it actually only took me about a 1/2 hour of research based on your photo and using older aerial and ground photo's to figure it out.
 
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franklin

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Figure all you want I know what I have. Even this website here disagrees with what you have just posted. https://www.gardenguides.com/98669-calculate-age-beech-tree.html

The beech tree is 133 inches in circumference 4 ft up therefore it is 42 inches in diameter times 6 equals 252 years old. About 94 years before the end of the Civil War.
 
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GoDeep

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Figure all you want I know what I have.
Well, i hope you are open to new evidence and are willing to change your mind when presented with the undeniable facts.

Ok, first, we've established its a Beech Tree in the Danville National Cemetery by your own testimony and your photo was taken in 2011, This Cemetery is completely surrounded by an old stone wall which separates it from the rest of the cemetery and is a fairly small in size.

First up is some details in your book cover picture that allow us to locate the EXACT tree in the Danville National Cemetery it is:

Click on picture to enlarge:

Beechexh1.jpg
 

GoDeep

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Figure all you want I know what I have. Even this website here disagrees with what you have just posted. https://www.gardenguides.com/98669-calculate-age-beech-tree.html

The beech tree is 133 inches in circumference 4 ft up therefore it is 42 inches in diameter times 6 equals 252 years old. About 94 years before the end of the Civil War.
I don't agree its 42 inches in diameter, it is only about 5 -6 ft in circumference. You can't measure where it branches out, that will give you a false reading.

The beech tree formula is as follows: Circumference in inches divided by 3.14 multiply by 6.

So 60 inch circumference divided by 3.14= 19.108 inches diameter x 6 -= approximately 80 years old, which is completely supported by the undeniable aerial photos of the tree i'll be posting soon so just hang on a bit more.
 
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franklin

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Well, i hope you are open to new evidence and are willing to change your mind when presented with the undeniable facts.

Ok, first, we've established its a Beech Tree in the Danville National Cemetery by your own testimony and your photo was taken in 2011, This Cemetery is completely surrounded by an old stone wall which separates it from the rest of the cemetery and is a fairly small in size.

First up is some details in your book cover picture that allow us to locate the EXACT tree in the Danville National Cemetery it is:

Click on picture to enlarge:

View attachment 1993788
Yes I believe everyone knows this beech tree is in the Danville, Virginia National Cemetery. It was in a Danville Newspaper article about 6 years. No problem there.
That tree is NO WHERE near 42 inches in diameter, it is only about 5 -6 ft in circumference! You can't measure where it branches out, that will give you a false reading.

The beech tree formula is as follows: Circumference in inches divided by 3.14 multiply by 6.

So 60 inch circumference divided by 3.14= 19.108 inches diameter x 6 -= approximately 80 years old, which is completely supported by the undeniable aerial photos of the tree i'll be posting soon so just hang on a bit more.
My post says the beech tree is 133 inches in circumference where do you get 60 inches from your own observation.
 

GoDeep

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Here is an aerial image from 2018 of the Danville National Cemetery. As you can see it's completely surrounded by a stone wall and is a bit larger then a football field and contains a little over 2 dozen trees and shurbs if you count them up. The Beech tree in question is easy to pick out from the other trees as it's in on the right towards the bottom corner. and is one of only two trees with a fork only a few feet off the ground in the cemetery (more pics coming soon on the ground which will allow you to with certianty determine the exact tree).
beechexh2.jpg
 
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franklin

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I measured 4 feet up as said in my post not your 5 or 6 feet up around the limbs. Do you have trouble comprehending or reading what is posted?
 

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Deep, the thread is about Franklin's book, why are you arguing with Franklin about the tree pictured on the cover of his book? Stop attacking the thread, nowhere in the opening post did Franklin ask for anyone's opinion.
 

GoDeep

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Now, lets go to a street view to determine the EXACT tree in question. For anyone following along, you can go to google earth and click on street view and move and pan around and see the entire cemetery and every tree in it,. There are only two trees with forks close to the ground, making it really easy to narrow down.

Now this view, shows us the exact beach, as you can see when you compare it to his book cover photo, it is forked only a few feet of the ground, and is approx. 6 rows over from the stone wall, 15+ rows back from the front wall and the wood fence behind the stone wall is visible.

Hold tight, i'll now swing the camera around and you can see the house from the first picture clearly in the background.

Click to enlarge:
beechexh3.jpg
 

GoDeep

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Next i've swung the camera aound 360. The book cover picture is taken from behind the tree shooting towards this street and the house seen in the book cover picture clearly matches the house seen here:

Click to enlarge:
beechexh4.jpg
 

GoDeep

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So we know the exact tree photo'd by using reference points.

So we know that it is this tree (or at least in this clump of trees)

Here is the Beech Tree in 2018 and next i will post of it in 1955 so hold on:

Click to enlarge:

beechexh5.jpg
 

GoDeep

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And heres the same view of our Beech Tree in 1955. As you can see, it's a baby tree at that point. If you overlay the two aerials, you see this is the exact same tree in both. This puts the age of the tree at a max of around 100 and more likely around 80 years old. . There should be some even older 1930's aerials out there, i'll see if i can dig them up later.

Click to enlarge:

beech6.jpg
 

GoDeep

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Heres another view of the tree, in fact, that may even be "Franklin" in the picture.

If it was a 250- 300 year old tree, even in the 1955 it would be around 200 years old, so it would be a mature, full grown tree and its canopy would look indiscernible from the 2018 aerial, but its clear the canopy is 20 times the size in 2018 vs 1955. aerial

I agree it's larger then i first thought, but i think it looks a bit larger than it is due to it branching out so low with some girth to the branches, and given the aerial photo evidence, we know even in 1955 it was quite small then, so it's grown faster then it would in the wild likely due to the conditions it's growing in where it doesn't have to compete as much with other trees and under brush for sun, water and nutrients.


For reference, i'm about the same size as the man in the photo and i have a 36" waist.

beechalt.jpg



Heres another view of it to give another perspective of its size:

Click to enlarge:

beechangle2.jpg
 
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xr7ator

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Franklin. How about some pics of the 1830's through 1887 carvings?
 
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