She was only 3 days old.

Bigcypresshunter

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I posted this here last year, but have yet to positively ID. We have some new members and I could get some new thoughts. It is silver and very THIN like a tag and the size of a quarter. Its hand engraved on the front in Old English copperplate script:

Jo-Ann L. Hall
12-30-43--1-2-44


There are some official looking numbers on the back: G-1506.

The back is also hand engraved. The numbers may coincide with a US military grave plot but what cemetery?... :dontknow: What century? :dontknow:

Plot G- Row 15- Grave 06? :dontknow:
 

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Bigcypresshunter

Bigcypresshunter

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What about a cremation tag ?
The engraving style is 1800s- early 1900s. I dont know what century this token was engraved but my research found there were no cremations in 1844. All the 20th century cremation tags found have been stainless. The other thought is that silver would melt or burn up with the bones.
 
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Bigcypresshunter

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I love it... a 16 year old posted mystery, that by the sounds of it still hasn't been solved. :laughing7:
Best of luck with finally getting your mystery disc find I.D.'d BigC.

Dave
I put it away in a safe deposit box and forgot about it until I noticed some interest of late... Its of special interest to me because I found it on the Treasure Coast. The Treasure Coast must have the cleanest beaches in the world. I was only able to find it after 2 back to back hurricanes stripped the beaches. My guess it lay buried a very long time. My guess 1844 but could be 1744 or possibly 1944. I just don't know. Its the exact size of a Spanish Reale and seems to have similar edge markings and not a reeded edge
jo Ann Hall tag (1).jpg
JoAnn Hall3 G-1506.jpg
but its also the size of a thinly shaved US silver quarter..
Jo-Ann L. Hall
12-30-43--1-2-44

joAnn Hall 2.jpg
 
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crashbandicoot

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I put it away in a safe deposit box and forgot about it until I noticed some interest of late... Its of special interest to me because I found it on the Treasure Coast. The Treasure Coast must have the cleanest beaches in the world. I was only able to find it after 2 back to back hurricanes stripped the beaches. My guess it lay buried a very long time. My guess 1844 but could be 1744 or possibly 1944. I just don't know. Its the exact size of a Spanish Reale and seems to have similar edge markings and not a reeded edge View attachment 2040073 View attachment 2040074 but its also the size of a thinly shaved US silver quarter..
Jo-Ann L. Hall
12-30-43--1-2-44

View attachment 2040071
I don,t know if this has been posted but how about a ID tag attached to the urn or container that held the ashes? Affixed after the cremation.
 
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Bigcypresshunter

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I don,t know if this has been posted but how about a ID tag attached to the urn or container that held the ashes? Affixed after the cremation.
It was probably mentioned over the years and at first sounds like a very good possibility. But a cremation would make it 1944. I was unable to find any record of this birth or death that matches. I would think a baby named Jo-Ann L. Hall born in the US in 1943/died 1944 would be on record. Its been years so if anybody wants to continue the search, go at it. I think we even tried variations in the spelling Joan, Joanne, Jo-Anna etc. but no match on those dates. The engraving style is old copper-script. I even matched each letter with the copperplate-script alphabet to be certain. There are some variations. I remember the L. matched perfectly and there is a dot after it. It took me a while to even realize the correct spelling. Its a known shipwreck site (both Spanish and English shipwrecks) and this may even be an English colonial burial at sea with no known records, washed up on the beach with the rest of the shipwreck debris. There was a US Army fort near here for a short period in the 1840's, abandoned by Indian hostilities and there was a Hall stationed there in the census records. During WW2 the beach was a US Naval Air Station, bombing and training site. Lots of possibilities.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copperplate_script
 
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crashbandicoot

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It was probably mentioned over the years and at first sounds like a very good possibility. But a cremation would make it 1944. I was unable to find any record of this birth or death that matches. I would think a baby named Jo-Ann L. Hall born in the US in 1943/died 1944 would be on record. Its been years so if anybody wants to continue the search, go at it. I think we even tried variations in the spelling Joan, Joanne, Jo-Anna etc. but no match on those dates. The engraving style is old copper-script. I even matched each letter with the copperplate-script alphabet to be certain. There are some variations. I remember the L. matched perfectly and there is a dot after it. It took me a while to even realize the correct spelling. Its a known shipwreck site (both Spanish and English shipwrecks) and this may even be an English colonial burial at sea with no known records, washed up on the beach with the rest of the shipwreck debris. There was a US Army fort here for a short period in the 1840's, abandoned by Indian hostilities and there was a Hall stationed there in the census records. During WW2 it was a US Navy beach training site. Lots of possibilities.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copperplate_script
I,d love to see it solved.Just for the ability to remember who she was and how she came to be here.I,m sentimental that way.
 
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nagant

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the flip side seem 20th century but being silver is weird. Like a tool tag or early dog tag on one side and a memorial on the other. can you tell if it was stamped before or after the the engraving was done?
 
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the flip side seem 20th century but being silver is weird. Like a tool tag or early dog tag on one side and a memorial on the other. can you tell if it was stamped before or after the the engraving was done?
I thought it was a modern stamped utility tag of some sort when I first dug it from the hurricane stripped beach. Thinking it was junk, I actually gave it away. My friend sanded off the encrustation with sandpaper(yikes) revealing the name and dates. I actually had to buy it back from him. Nothing on the silver tog is stamped. Closer inspection reveals both sides are definitely hand engraved. I posted an example of this type of engraving on the previous page (refer to post #390). I should pull it out of the safe deposit box some day and take better scans and photos.


The engraved number must have meaning. My friend actually mailed it to an Archie who mailed it back believing it means Plot G- Row 15- Grave 06.
 
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This post is very old and my memory not the best. But I seem to remember TN researchers actually discovered a military graveyard with matching numbers Plot G- Row 15- Grave 06 . But we couldn't match the name Jo-Ann Hall. But I just thought of something. My Dad was buried in a military cemetery and my Mom's ashes were placed on top of him. Maybe this baby was buried with someone else? That would make the numbers extremely important. I would have to search back and I have 2 different threads on this subject and they are both very long and possibly too boring to read thru. https://www.treasurenet.com/threads/treasure-beach-find.10760/page-3 I did find a Sergeant Hall listed in the census at the 1840s US Army fort near the location of the find.
 
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Here is what I posted in 2005 on the original Treasure Beach Find thread: https://www.treasurenet.com/threads/treasure-beach-find.10760/

Copy and Paste from 2005:

I hope I'm not boring anyone, but something is telling me to find out the mystery of this artifact. Who is this child, who made this tag, for what purpose, and in what century? Heavily encrusted on the face side, buried so deep in the dunes, uncovered only after two successive hurricanes; it must be old. I don't see a match with modern stainless steel cremation tags. The first legal cremation being in 1872, in Great Britain. I checked Vero Beach history at http://www.rootsweb.com/~flindian/timeline.htm. The US Army established a post at Fort Vinton in 1842. The first settlers arrived in Indian River with promise of land if they bear arms against the Indians. But the inhabitants of this county were driven from it on account of Indian hostilities, and few of them would return. By 1850, Ft. Vinton was abandoned. Was JoAnn L. Hall a child from this failed original Indian River colony? 1850 census- http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/fl/stlucie/census/1850/pg0222a.txt -lists a Michael Hall in the US Army. Could he be related? Could this be some kind of official coffin or toe tag? What do the numbers G1506 mean? I think this is the key to positive identification. I am writing to the Vero Beach Historical Society and will keep y'all updated. My prayers go out for New Orleans evacuees. cypresshunter.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Vinton
 
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Reading back on the original thread from 2005, it appears someone found a Jo Anna Hall born on the same date in Virginia. Does anybody know how to do a genealogy search to double check this?
 
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I wasn't convinced on the Virginia Hall being found on the Florida Coast but here is a TN members theory:

Hi Bigcypresshunter. Here's my theory......the family of Joanne Hall make the momentous decision to take a business trip to some Caribbean locale, perhaps some trading venture. My guess, given the very strylish english engraving on the medallion, is a British port, such as Port Royal.

Mr. Hall could have been from Norfolk, or Newport, Virginia, or wherever. In the course of this romantic and adventurous journey, Mrs. Hall, although 41 years of age, becomes with child. In this caribbean port, they find conditions are primitive, and the rate of infant mortality is high, especially for women beyond their ideal childbirth age, and when Mrs. has her baby, she tragically dies three days after birth. They give her the old English name "Joanne" which means "God is gracious".

The Halls decide to return to Virginia, and to have Joanne buried there. Mr. Hall has the local silversmith engrave a medallion showing Joanne's critical dates of birth and death. She is embalmed? and placed in a coffin, and the Halls book passage on a ship sailing early in January. Two or three weeks into their journey a violent storm wrecks the ship, depositing Joanne's tiny coffin and her remains on shore. 160 years later the very purpose of the medallion placed around her neck, a remembrance of her all too brief little life, is wonderfully fulfilled, and, thanks to your search the circle is finally closed. That's my theory.
Boardwalker
 
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ivan salis

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a bi6 back someone came up with a 1944 era match of a 3 day old female child that died yje token might be a creamtion tag or a rememberance tag the funeral homes often put toe tag t6ytpe coins on bodies to prevent mix ups thus the number for their records the engaved name is for the family for them
 
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Bigcypresshunter

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a bi6 back someone came up with a 1944 era match of a 3 day old female child that died yje token might be a creamtion tag or a rememberance tag the funeral homes often put toe tag t6ytpe coins on bodies to prevent mix ups thus the number for their records the engaved name is for the family for them
Hello Ivan. I do not remember finding a match of a 3 day old child in 1944 or I would have marked it solved. There was a Jo Anna Hall that may have matched the birth date in 1843 but she was born in Virginia and I think we are missing the date of death.
 
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DawnNC

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Hey Bigcypresshunter,
I disagree with the mortician who told you it wasn't a crematory tag.

"A creamationist told me it is not a creamation tag".

You found it on the beach right?

I find these all the time (albeit, modern ones, but just the same, still crematory tags). People come to the beach to throw the ashes into the water or they throw them from offshore in a boat. Winter storms move the sand in an either deposit these on the beach or they are rolled in with the close surf.
I was just reading through to see if anyone mentioned this.
My first impression was that it’s a cremation tag.
G- Georgia, G-Gainesville, G-?
 
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