Silver Forks

HI-McDunnogh

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Sep 7, 2018
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Dug these two, what I believe are silver, forks yesterday.

The one with more patina says Wm. A Rogers | German Silver . I found a little on Wm. A Rogers, but nothing with German Silver.

The cleaner one says ROGERS & BRO A1. "Established in 1858 at Waterbury by Asa Jr. and Simeon Rogers. Until 1874 the firm was only a flatware manufacturer. It was one of the original companies becoming part of International Silver Co. in 1898."

If anyone has any further info. on these pieces it'd be appreciated!
 

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Upvote 9

Red-Coat

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Dec 23, 2019
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As said, “German Silver” contains no silver. It was developed as an inexpensive tarnish-resistant alternative to silver in Germany in 1832 and became popular in Britain and then America a few years later. The usual formulation is 60% copper, 20% nickel and 20% zinc. At the beginning of its history it was usually sold “as-is” and then commonly electroplated from the 1840s onwards. If you see marks like “A1”, as on the other fork, that’s a quality indication relating to the thickness of the plating, so that fork isn’t silver either.

Although both forks are “Rogers”, they’re from two different companies. There were more than a dozen “Rogers” companies operating in America (some of which were connected by family relationships and some not) going through a complex series of name change by merger, absorption, separation, sale and takeover. Many of them ended up in the hands of Oneida or joined the International Silver Company conglomerate as a means of competing with bigger players.

Your information that Rogers & Bro was established in 1858 in Waterbury, Connecticut and became part of the International Silver company in 1898 is correct. That fork is their “Oval Thread” pattern, first produced in 1862, but a classic design that was in use for a number of years:

Oval.jpg

The other fork is by Wm. A Rogers. The company was originally founded in Niagara Falls, NY by the small storekeeper William A Rogers and ultimately the successor to the Niagara Silver company in c1904 as “Wm. A Rogers Ltd” and then bought by Oneida in 1929. It’s their “Violet” pattern, designed by William A Jameson and first produced in 1905:

Violet.jpg
 
Last edited:

Digger RJ

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Aug 24, 2017
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Dug these two, what I believe are silver, forks yesterday.

The one with more patina says Wm. A Rogers | German Silver . I found a little on Wm. A Rogers, but nothing with German Silver.

The cleaner one says ROGERS & BRO A1. "Established in 1858 at Waterbury by Asa Jr. and Simeon Rogers. Until 1874 the firm was only a flatware manufacturer. It was one of the original companies becoming part of International Silver Co. in 1898."

If anyone has any further info. on these pieces it'd be appreciated!
Nice!!! Congrats!!!
 

Blak bart

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Jun 6, 2016
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I also covet all my sterling, and plated pieces that I've found. So many hurricanes have raked our islands over the years and destroyed so many homes, that silverware is scattered over the islands, and is one of our more common finds. Congrats on your finds, and happy hunting !!
 

SD51

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Aug 24, 2016
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Thought I would mention that Nickel Silver is still used today to make fishing rod ferrules. When I refinish a bamboo flyrod, and the metal ferrules used to connect each section together need replacement, I can used either chrome plated brass or nickel silver ferrules.
I prefer to use the nickel silver (around $80 for a set) versus the brass (around $5 a set).
Here's a pic of the nickel silver ferrules on a bamboo flyrod...
Nickel Silver Ferrule 1 (2).jpg
 
OP
HI-McDunnogh

HI-McDunnogh

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Sep 7, 2018
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  • Thread Starter
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  • #14
Thought I would mention that Nickel Silver is still used today to make fishing rod ferrules. When I refinish a bamboo flyrod, and the metal ferrules used to connect each section together need replacement, I can used either chrome plated brass or nickel silver ferrules.
I prefer to use the nickel silver (around $80 for a set) versus the brass (around $5 a set).
Here's a pic of the nickel silver ferrules on a bamboo flyrod...
View attachment 2006180
Nice! Appreciate the additional information!
 

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