Soldiers' Lost Vein

skyhawk1251

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Nov 9, 2018
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I know of three versions of the "Two Soldiers" tale. There may be more than three. Here, I'll only be concerned with the version given in Barry Storm's book "Thunder Gods Gold" in the chapter titled, "Soldiers' Lost Vein", but I'll also include the version given in Bark's Notes. The three versions are vastly different.

Storm's version of the tale is based on his interview of Jack Frazer, who was mining foreman at the Silver King Mine, and who was the first to see the gold ore they brought to the Silver King. According to Storm, Frazer's words led him to make the note, "a reddish vein about a foot thick, half-way up a black-topped hill." Storm then went on to find a fired rifle shell, which he claimed was evidence that the soldiers had been traveling the low pass between East Boulder and Needle Canyons, when a deer was flushed from cover.

Accepting Storm's version as it is, I used GE to take a look at the "low pass" south of Black Top Mesa. I then decided that if I had only one day and could search only one specific area, I would pick the location where the existing trail is the highest on the south slopes of Black Top Mesa, and where rocky outcrops are abundant. I've enclosed those places inside red boxes.

Take notice that I'm only accepting Storm's version to see where it could possibly lead. I'm not willing to affirm that his tale has much factual content. His discovery of the fired rifle shell is miraculous, to say the least. Do I think Storm's account really leads to "Soldiers' Lost Vein"? Possible, but not probable. If "Soldiers' Lost Vein" is/was really there, do I think it could still be there? Not a chance.

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QUOTE FROM BARK'S NOTES ON TWO SOLDIERS:

"So, they struck out toward the King, and struck a trail which they had been told was the proper one to take. They followed it for several miles to a creek crossing, where there was water. The trail after that, appeared to run nearly north and the King was nearly south, so while they felt certain that the trail would eventually land them at the King, it must be a long way around, and they were tired. They decided to make a short cut, went up this creek for a distance, CAME TO A WATERFALL, and could go no further. They came back down the creek, and finally go out on the side of the creek toward the King and up on a very rough and high mountain. There was no trail. They struck out, always trying to work toward their destination, but making very slow progress. They ran onto a trail and such a queer place for a trail. They concluded to follow it and see if it wouldn't lead them out of that God-forsaken country. They followed it but a short distance, and were in high hopes when the trail led them THROUGH a cave between the peaks. They went on a little further and came to a tunnel that had been walled up, with workings above and over."

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C.png
 

coazon de oro

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May 7, 2010
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I know of three versions of the "Two Soldiers" tale. There may be more than three. Here, I'll only be concerned with the version given in Barry Storm's book "Thunder Gods Gold" in the chapter titled, "Soldiers' Lost Vein", but I'll also include the version given in Bark's Notes. The three versions are vastly different.

Storm's version of the tale is based on his interview of Jack Frazer, who was mining foreman at the Silver King Mine, and who was the first to see the gold ore they brought to the Silver King. According to Storm, Frazer's words led him to make the note, "a reddish vein about a foot thick, half-way up a black-topped hill." Storm then went on to find a fired rifle shell, which he claimed was evidence that the soldiers had been traveling the low pass between East Boulder and Needle Canyons, when a deer was flushed from cover.

Accepting Storm's version as it is, I used GE to take a look at the "low pass" south of Black Top Mesa. I then decided that if I had only one day and could search only one specific area, I would pick the location where the existing trail is the highest on the south slopes of Black Top Mesa, and where rocky outcrops are abundant. I've enclosed those places inside red boxes.

Take notice that I'm only accepting Storm's version to see where it could possibly lead. I'm not willing to affirm that his tale has much factual content. His discovery of the fired rifle shell is miraculous, to say the least. Do I think Storm's account really leads to "Soldiers' Lost Vein"? Possible, but not probable. If "Soldiers' Lost Vein" is/was really there, do I think it could still be there? Not a chance.

------------------------------------------------------------------------

QUOTE FROM BARK'S NOTES ON TWO SOLDIERS:

"So, they struck out toward the King, and struck a trail which they had been told was the proper one to take. They followed it for several miles to a creek crossing, where there was water. The trail after that, appeared to run nearly north and the King was nearly south, so while they felt certain that the trail would eventually land them at the King, it must be a long way around, and they were tired. They decided to make a short cut, went up this creek for a distance, CAME TO A WATERFALL, and could go no further. They came back down the creek, and finally go out on the side of the creek toward the King and up on a very rough and high mountain. There was no trail. They struck out, always trying to work toward their destination, but making very slow progress. They ran onto a trail and such a queer place for a trail. They concluded to follow it and see if it wouldn't lead them out of that God-forsaken country. They followed it but a short distance, and were in high hopes when the trail led them THROUGH a cave between the peaks. They went on a little further and came to a tunnel that had been walled up, with workings above and over."

------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Howdy Skyhawk,

Page 73, the bottom left corner of that picture shows what seems like a Peralta carved cross that kind of points to the arrow on top. Kind of gives truth to the story.

Homar
 

markmar

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Oct 17, 2012
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One simple question/answer can validate Barry Storm story. Could soldiers keep an Army-issued weapon after their enlistment has expired?
 

markmar

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Markmar,
This was on the internet.
Is it correct? I don’t know.
View attachment 2048898
I believe the two soldiers from Barry Storm story were not related to the Civil War. Their saga has occurred about ten years and more after the Civil War.
There are few details which are not mentioned in the story and another that doesn't make sense.
In the story was not made a referrence if the soldiers were riding or walking, clue which could help to distinguish the terrain they could pass through. Storm wrote a detailed route from the Fort McDowell till the south end of Black Top Mesa but after that, nothing, leaving to the reader to guess the remaining route to the Silver KIng mine.
Another odd thing the soldiers did, they decided to follow the Military Trail through the Superstition for a longer trip in regards to enjoy the desert. That would been the most insane decision for only two persons in that period by transpassing the stronhold of the renegate Apaches, so something tells they risked their lifes in purpose, because they knew about that gold vein from another source, maybe another soldier. And IMHO, this connects indirect the story of the Two Soldiers with another Barry Storm story which is related to a soldier from Fort McDowell who " sold " the mine in exchance with his bill to a merchant by the name John Carrol.
So, if someone would find my opinion logical, then the place of the two soldiers vein will change in another region than that from south BTM pass, not wanting to say how south of BTM are not few gold mines.
 

Idahodutch

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Sep 25, 2019
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One simple question/answer can validate Barry Storm story. Could soldiers keep an Army-issued weapon after their enlistment has expired?
Ok markmar,
This guy that posted this one believes it was available for soldiers to buy their gun, up until 1919.

Once again, I don’t know if this is correct, and it appears you don’t either. 👍😜

Noticed you are already moving the goal posts. 😁
6D68DA3D-04C2-4A3C-B56B-EBD94D17C51A.png
 

markmar

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Oct 17, 2012
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Ok markmar,
This guy that posted this one believes it was available for soldiers to buy their gun, up until 1919.

Once again, I don’t know if this is correct, and it appears you don’t either. 👍😜

Noticed you are already moving the goal posts. 😁 View attachment 2049037
Ok, maybe they could buy their Army issued rifle, but for what reason? They have enlisted in the Army for money and after that they wanted to work as miners. To me seems how they would not do a job where they would need a rifle. Maybe only for hunting.
After their enlistment has expired, they wore the soldier uniform maybe because they haven't the money to buy civilian clothes, so why to give money for their Army weapon? I believe they were walking the whole distance because they haven't money to take the stage coach from the Phoenix to Pinal, or like I wrote they took that route in purpose. Or, the Barry Storm story is true and all those who searched the region for the gold vein, including John Clemenson aka Barry Storm, were blind or have not idea how that gold vein looked like.
 

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