🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Spoon handle

Hulk2003

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May 25, 2019
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Hello I was wondering if anyone could tell me how old this spoon handle is that I found today.
 

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traveller777

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Aug 20, 2017
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East Tennessee
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It is always helpful to give as much information as possible, especially size, material of construction, and some background on find.
 
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Red-Coat

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Dec 23, 2019
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For sure it's a flatware handle and most likely spoon rather than fork. I believe the last of the icons for the 'hallmarks' is a crown (can't distinguish the others), and the marks are this way up:

Pseudo.jpg

They aren't British hallmarks and I think not actually hallmarks at all, but typical pseudo hallmarks of the kind often seen on American-made nickel-silver (a base-metal alloy with no silver content) which may or may not have been silver-plated.

The pattern is one of a myriad of variants of 'King's pattern' in 'hourglass' profile, but a rather crude low-workmanship version not likely to have come from any of the big makers. King's pattern was designed around 1789 by Henry & John Lias on commission to produce silverware as part of a service for George III to celebrate his return to health. By the 1800s, it was being widely copied (with countless variations by almost every maker) for sale to the general public. It became probably the most popular flatware design ever and is still produced today.

Kings.jpg

I would think your handle is likely mid- to late-1800s.
 
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Hulk2003

Greenie
May 25, 2019
11
28
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #7
For sure it's a flatware handle and most likely spoon rather than fork. I believe the last of the icons for the 'hallmarks' is a crown (can't distinguish the others), and the marks are this way up:

View attachment 2022639

They aren't British hallmarks and I think not actually hallmarks at all, but typical pseudo hallmarks of the kind often seen on American-made nickel-silver (a base-metal alloy with no silver content) which may or may not have been silver-plated.

The pattern is one of a myriad of variants of 'King's pattern' in 'hourglass' profile, but a rather crude low-workmanship version not likely to have come from any of the big makers. King's pattern was designed around 1789 by Henry & John Lias on commission to produce silverware as part of a service for George III to celebrate his return to health. By the 1800s, it was being widely copied (with countless variations by almost every maker) for sale to the general public. It became probably the most popular flatware design ever and is still produced today.

View attachment 2022640

I would think your handle is likely mid- to late-1800s.
Thank you for the information
 
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