Still finding targets in an area deamed cleaned out.

kac

Jr. Member
Aug 4, 2021
38
89
North East
Detector(s) used
Garrett AT Pro, Seahunter MKII, Apex, Makro Multi Kruzer, Tesoro Tejon. Started with a BH Tracker 505 back in early 90's.
Nokta Pulse Pointer and Minelab Profind 35.
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I have been hitting an old park at lunch before things freeze up. Over the years I have done really well in the area. It has been hit by tons of people so what is left is tricky to find. Managed to squeak out a musketball, buckle probably from a saddle and what I believe is a rosette which is late 1800's-early 1900's? 2nd one I found but this still has some deteail in the middle.

There is tons and tons of iron, lot of cut nails, old washers etc as much of it was farmed. I find it easier to use my Tejon for this type of hunting with a 10x12 widescan that gets me plenty deep... clad quarter was close to 14" down. If anyone cares I set my primary disc to just at iron (where a cut nail will give a broken signal), 2nd disc is set at the high end of nickel. I crank up the sensitivity as Tesoro's are fixed gain machines you can control the sensitivity on them where the machine will read what is ground and what is a target. I get the sensitivity as high as possible without any chatter from emi. Signals I listen for are all roll tones. Iron will give a kind of a whoop where it starts loud, goes soft then ends in a loud like a reverse roll so it is pretty easy to identify larger chunks. When I get a good signal I will junk check with the 2nd disc which tells me if the roll is below small silver and then I can judge if it is just a piece of foil, deep chunk of coal etc. Anything above that mark that has a sharp flat sound is almost always aluminum as aluminum sounds flat and bright. I do get tripped up on really deep cans sometimes when I forget to lift my coil to see if the signal carries or not. Large rock is not coal, has some rust in it and might be iron ore. It's fairly heavy and kept it out of curiosity, never know if you come across a meteorite.
 

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Digger RJ

Gold Member
Aug 24, 2017
12,419
21,159
SW Missouri/Oklahoma
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
Minelab CTX 3030; Minelab Equinox 800
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I have been hitting an old park at lunch before things freeze up. Over the years I have done really well in the area. It has been hit by tons of people so what is left is tricky to find. Managed to squeak out a musketball, buckle probably from a saddle and what I believe is a rosette which is late 1800's-early 1900's? 2nd one I found but this still has some deteail in the middle.

There is tons and tons of iron, lot of cut nails, old washers etc as much of it was farmed. I find it easier to use my Tejon for this type of hunting with a 10x12 widescan that gets me plenty deep... clad quarter was close to 14" down. If anyone cares I set my primary disc to just at iron (where a cut nail will give a broken signal), 2nd disc is set at the high end of nickel. I crank up the sensitivity as Tesoro's are fixed gain machines you can control the sensitivity on them where the machine will read what is ground and what is a target. I get the sensitivity as high as possible without any chatter from emi. Signals I listen for are all roll tones. Iron will give a kind of a whoop where it starts loud, goes soft then ends in a loud like a reverse roll so it is pretty easy to identify larger chunks. When I get a good signal I will junk check with the 2nd disc which tells me if the roll is below small silver and then I can judge if it is just a piece of foil, deep chunk of coal etc. Anything above that mark that has a sharp flat sound is almost always aluminum as aluminum sounds flat and bright. I do get tripped up on really deep cans sometimes when I forget to lift my coil to see if the signal carries or not. Large rock is not coal, has some rust in it and might be iron ore. It's fairly heavy and kept it out of curiosity, never know if you come across a meteorite.
Nice!!! Congrats!!!
 
OP
K

kac

Jr. Member
Aug 4, 2021
38
89
North East
Detector(s) used
Garrett AT Pro, Seahunter MKII, Apex, Makro Multi Kruzer, Tesoro Tejon. Started with a BH Tracker 505 back in early 90's.
Nokta Pulse Pointer and Minelab Profind 35.
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #3
The amount of iron in the ground is crazy. I will litterally get a half dozen to dozen blips per swing. I have hunted it in all metal mode with my Multi Kruzer and even in 3 tone but I get target fatigue. Really can't beat the old analogs and their excellent threshold discrimination for this kind of work. Just incredibly effective in picking out targets of interest.
 

Hunk-a-lead

Bronze Member
Dec 20, 2020
1,150
1,469
Kansas City
Detector(s) used
Nokta Macro Simplex
Primary Interest:
Metal Detecting
I have been hitting an old park at lunch before things freeze up. Over the years I have done really well in the area. It has been hit by tons of people so what is left is tricky to find. Managed to squeak out a musketball, buckle probably from a saddle and what I believe is a rosette which is late 1800's-early 1900's? 2nd one I found but this still has some deteail in the middle.

There is tons and tons of iron, lot of cut nails, old washers etc as much of it was farmed. I find it easier to use my Tejon for this type of hunting with a 10x12 widescan that gets me plenty deep... clad quarter was close to 14" down. If anyone cares I set my primary disc to just at iron (where a cut nail will give a broken signal), 2nd disc is set at the high end of nickel. I crank up the sensitivity as Tesoro's are fixed gain machines you can control the sensitivity on them where the machine will read what is ground and what is a target. I get the sensitivity as high as possible without any chatter from emi. Signals I listen for are all roll tones. Iron will give a kind of a whoop where it starts loud, goes soft then ends in a loud like a reverse roll so it is pretty easy to identify larger chunks. When I get a good signal I will junk check with the 2nd disc which tells me if the roll is below small silver and then I can judge if it is just a piece of foil, deep chunk of coal etc. Anything above that mark that has a sharp flat sound is almost always aluminum as aluminum sounds flat and bright. I do get tripped up on really deep cans sometimes when I forget to lift my coil to see if the signal carries or not. Large rock is not coal, has some rust in it and might be iron ore. It's fairly heavy and kept it out of curiosity, never know if you come across a meteorite.
perseverance pays off, wtg and thanks for posting
 

john845

Sr. Member
Dec 26, 2017
401
1,054
Newburgh ny
Detector(s) used
Whites Class III SL. Spectrum xlt Tesoro Vaquero Compadre
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I like using my vaquero for sites like that. I have been to a few parks and i just listen for the deep signals. If i get into a spot where there is alot of modern stuff and older stuff mixed in like at an old park. I will just dig the deep sounding targets that give nice consistent hits but i can tell there are deep because the audio is muted and not as loud as a surface signal. Sometimes i get fooled by a 22 shell. I have done quite well like that in parks. I have managed to dig quite a few IHP s in parks that are littered with modern junk and clad using that method with out digging to much clad.
 

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