🔎 UNIDENTIFIED Strange pebble found in a forest stream in Quebec, Canada

Altosoro

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Jun 9, 2022
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Hi, I found this black pebble a couple of years ago and it was the only pebble in the zone in wich I found it. Does someone know what it is?
 

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Back-of-the-boat

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Was it the only black pebble or was it the only pebble at all? maybe it is coprolite that has been tumbled into that shape, if it was the only black rock you found.:dontknow:
 
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Back-of-the-boat

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I'm starting to think that it may be a rounded stone meteorite like this one I found on google
Copied off the internet on how to determine if it is a meteorite. Density: Meteorites are usually quite heavy for their size, since they contain metallic iron and dense minerals. Magnetic: Since most meteorites contain metallic iron, a magnet will often stick to them. For “stony” meteorites, a magnet might not stick, but if you hang the magnet by a string, it will be attracted.
 
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GoldieLocks

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I see a mineral such as calcium with black acrylic paint or maybe a kind of tar that is waterproof all over it. Tell me, was this some sort of test?
 
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blauer

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In keeping with logical reasoning this is most likely not a meteorite.

There are plenty of black, dense minerals to be considered, e.g., magnetite, hematite, etc.

To begin, you need to some simple tests: hardness and streak (black and white Porcelain). Without these we really are just guessing.
 
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Ohiogoldfever

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Oct 15, 2020
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Looks like a cool stone. How heavy is it? Does it seem really heavy for its size?

I have a daughter that is as into rocks as I am. She however is known for only carrying her finds for a distance before conning me into hauling them or discarding them in some interesting place for another curious soul to find. Fairly likely that’s what’s happens here.

I would have scooped it up as well I am sure. Cool rock. Maybe call it blacky? Or chubby. Or….. I’m not good at this.
 
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Altosoro

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Jun 9, 2022
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Copied off the internet on how to determine if it is a meteorite. Density: Meteorites are usually quite heavy for their size, since they contain metallic iron and dense minerals. Magnetic: Since most meteorites contain metallic iron, a magnet will often stick to them. For “stony” meteorites, a magnet might not stick, but if you hang the magnet by a string, it will be attracted

Copied off the internet on how to determine if it is a meteorite. Density: Meteorites are usually quite heavy for their size, since they contain metallic iron and dense minerals. Magnetic: Since most meteorites contain metallic iron, a magnet will often stick to them. For “stony” meteorites, a magnet might not stick, but if you hang the magnet by a string, it will be attracted.
Magnets don't stick to it. I cannot test the attraction now, I'll verify soon.
 
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Altosoro

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Jun 9, 2022
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Looks like a cool stone. How heavy is it? Does it seem really heavy for its size?

I have a daughter that is as into rocks as I am. She however is known for only carrying her finds for a distance before conning me into hauling them or discarding them in some interesting place for another curious soul to find. Fairly likely that’s what’s happens here.

I would have scooped it up as well I am sure. Cool rock. Maybe call it blacky? Or chubby. Or….. I’m not good at this.
The stone is a little heavier than normal but not metal heavy. Yes maybe someone found it and dropped it where I found it but it was like in the middle of the forest so... I'll call it Globullus.
 
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Altosoro

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Jun 9, 2022
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In keeping with logical reasoning this is most likely not a meteorite.

There are plenty of black, dense minerals to be considered, e.g., magnetite, hematite, etc.

To begin, you need to some simple tests: hardness and streak (black and white Porcelain). Without these we really are just guessing.
Yes you are right. I'll try to test it or maybe I could send it to Nems (New England Meteoritical Services Testing)?
 
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Treasure_Hunter

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Welcome to TreasureNet, happy to have you with us.

It looks like it has been water tumbled, could have come out of the stream bank and then been washed downstream no telling how far.
 
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traveller777

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Possibly deposited by glacial movements. I found a strangely shaped piece of magnetite on Brayton Barf, a glacial deposit, just outside Selby, England. No other stones remotely resembled it in the area. It was found in a recently eroded ditch.
 
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Ohiogoldfever

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Possibly deposited by glacial movements. I found a strangely shaped piece of magnetite on Brayton Barf, a glacial deposit, just outside Selby, England. No other stones remotely resembled it in the area. It was found in a recently eroded ditch.

My family and I are flying back home from Maine today. Last night we were walking a beach that was packed with glacial till. Freaking everything you could think of scattered everywhere. I could have spent hours and hours hunting for quarts species.

I found a couple pretty suspect chunks that are headed home with me.
 
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Zakon Krzyżacki

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May 25, 2022
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The stone is a little heavier than normal but not metal heavy. Yes maybe someone found it and dropped it where I found it but it was like in the middle of the forest so... I'll call it Globullus.
The title of your thread says you found it in a forest stream.
So did you find it in the woods or in a stream?
Maybe I am confused.
 
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