''The Hill'' - Day 4 - 2 Hammered & Very Rare Roman Coin?

CRUSADER

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May 25, 2007
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XP Deus II v0.6 with 11" Coil
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Continued what will turn out to be a mega grid of 'The Hill', by far the largest area we have tried to cover. Just to see if there is much on the lower slopes.
We gridded for 5 hrs 15 mins in really mild conditions & managed to miss the rain today.
Surface conditions were pretty dry considering the recent rain & perfect for spotting any newly washed flints.

10 Roman Coins - 1 of Carausius which is not in any of our books & can't find one on the www. (Will update from our British Museum contact soon)UPDATE:
''Your coin confirms its original type, but of course your coin is the only complete example.''

The largest & heaviest Padlock I have ever dug
2 Tudor Strap-ends
Neolithic Flint
Part of a Lead Cloth Seal
Lead Token
Jetton
14th C Buckle
Medieval Leather Mount
3 Roman Brooches
2 Saxon Strap-Ends
Bit of a 6th C Saxon Brooch
Saxon Pin-head
2 Hammered - 1 OK of Ed I, Bury St Edmund Mint

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blossom

Bronze Member
Apr 18, 2022
1,466
10,101
UK
UPDATE (from British Museum):

''Copper alloy radiate of Carausius (AD 286-93) (Reece Period 14), [ORI]ENS AVGGG, Sol standing facing, head left, in facing quadriga, raising right hand and holding globe in left. Mint of London, - // MLXXI. RIC V, pt 2, - This coin confirms a type only known from a rubbing in a Mike Vosper catalogue for which the reverse legend was unclear (RIchard Bourne in Numismatic Circular, Dec 2004, p. 378, Fig. 3, after Mike Vosper, Fixed Price List 80, Sept-Oct 1999, no. 49). It therefore provides complete evidence for this new type.
Coin identified and recorded with image kindly supplied by the Finder.''


I've asked for clarify, but it seems fairly clear that our coin, the only known provenanced (GPS) example confirms a new type. (Only seen once before as a rubbing!)
Therefore, this is now our 2nd Carausius that is the 2nd one known of it's type.:occasion14:(UPDATE: ''Your coin confirms its original type, but of course your coin is the only complete example.'')
I think it may have just missed being published in a new book focussed on Carausius!

PS Gets more interesting, see below only overstruck example & recent reply;
View attachment 2057572
''The previous specimen had been overstruck with another type (of Salus with S P in field) so was only partially visible. Your piece is only MLXXI.
Your coin confirms its original type, but of course your coin is the only complete example."
Wow Crusader!! If that is not the stuff of dreams.. i dont no what is!! Congratulations from me and him xxx
 

stupot

Jr. Member
Jun 21, 2008
42
374
Well thats another big find in the field of numismatics! I was
UPDATE (from British Museum):

''Copper alloy radiate of Carausius (AD 286-93) (Reece Period 14), [ORI]ENS AVGGG, Sol standing facing, head left, in facing quadriga, raising right hand and holding globe in left. Mint of London, - // MLXXI. RIC V, pt 2, - This coin confirms a type only known from a rubbing in a Mike Vosper catalogue for which the reverse legend was unclear (RIchard Bourne in Numismatic Circular, Dec 2004, p. 378, Fig. 3, after Mike Vosper, Fixed Price List 80, Sept-Oct 1999, no. 49). It therefore provides complete evidence for this new type.
Coin identified and recorded with image kindly supplied by the Finder.''


I've asked for clarify, but it seems fairly clear that our coin, the only known provenanced (GPS) example confirms a new type. (Only seen once before as a rubbing!)
Therefore, this is now our 2nd Carausius that is the 2nd one known of it's type.:occasion14:(UPDATE: ''Your coin confirms its original type, but of course your coin is the only complete example.'')
I think it may have just missed being published in a new book focussed on Carausius!

PS Gets more interesting, see below only overstruck example & recent reply;
View attachment 2057572
''The previous specimen had been overstruck with another type (of Salus with S P in field) so was only partially visible. Your piece is only MLXXI.
Your coin confirms its original type, but of course your coin is the only complete example."
 

stupot

Jr. Member
Jun 21, 2008
42
374
UPDATE (from British Museum):

''Copper alloy radiate of Carausius (AD 286-93) (Reece Period 14), [ORI]ENS AVGGG, Sol standing facing, head left, in facing quadriga, raising right hand and holding globe in left. Mint of London, - // MLXXI. RIC V, pt 2, - This coin confirms a type only known from a rubbing in a Mike Vosper catalogue for which the reverse legend was unclear (RIchard Bourne in Numismatic Circular, Dec 2004, p. 378, Fig. 3, after Mike Vosper, Fixed Price List 80, Sept-Oct 1999, no. 49). It therefore provides complete evidence for this new type.
Coin identified and recorded with image kindly supplied by the Finder.''


I've asked for clarify, but it seems fairly clear that our coin, the only known provenanced (GPS) example confirms a new type. (Only seen once before as a rubbing!)
Therefore, this is now our 2nd Carausius that is the 2nd one known of it's type.:occasion14:(UPDATE: ''Your coin confirms its original type, but of course your coin is the only complete example.'')
I think it may have just missed being published in a new book focussed on Carausius!

PS Gets more interesting, see below only overstruck example & recent reply;
View attachment 2057572
''The previous specimen had been overstruck with another type (of Salus with S P in field) so was only partially visible. Your piece is only MLXXI.
Your coin confirms its original type, but of course your coin is the only complete example."
Another great find in the field of numismatics! I was unaware of Mike Vospers coin at all being of the same type. There is something quite fascinating about coins of Carausius, particularly since he was a British Emperor. He certainly invested a lot of time in many different types of coins unlike most of the Emperors from Rome. Even silver made an appearance which many have been found in England. Not all of his coins are PAX AVG as they are the commonest! You've done a great thing finding that coin & somewhat valuable too.

An ongoing story i'm sure.

Kind regards, Numismatist & long time detector user. Stuart
 

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