THE Random Chat Thread - AKA "The RCT" - No shirt or shoes required - Open 24 / 7

releventchair

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from this website, http://www.oldantiquepottery.info/rrpco.htm:

"In 1900, Frank Ransbottom and his brother started a pottery company in Roseville, Ohio to make stoneware and pottery. By 1916 Ransbottom Pottery was the largest producer of stoneware jars in America. Around 1920, they merged with Robinson Clay Products Co. who created bricks and tiles. The name was changed to RRP Company (to reflect both initials) and product lines expanded to include gardenware in addition to their art pottery and functional goods. The company was able to endure through the great depression and was in business until 2005, when it finally ceased operations. Since RRP Co no longer exists, it fairly assured that their pottery will become more collectible and valuable in the future."



from an etsy post:

"The crown marks from the two companies are very similar, but the crocks produced by RRP have the crown impressed into the clay. ~ the crown mark on this crock is not impressed into the clay, thus dating it from 1900-1920's "​




There are no other markings on the crock besides the crown with the 6 in it. AND, that crown does not appear to be impressed into the clay. So, I am guessing it is also from 1900-1920's. That being said, @releventchair , this would have been from my Polish Grandmother, so sausage in fat.

A description of....Something related I'm guessing.

When a weight is mentioned it does not mean special made just for crocks.
Nor uncommon that a regular plate (dinnerware type) would be placed on top of the stuff in the crock and then weighted with a clean rock. Or maybe even a brick.

Another reason to look over rocks /stones now when encountered for one with unique just right qualities..

Gee. If only there were stones and rocks in your region of the country!

Oh , description , right...

Use these Polish Fermentation Crocks to make healthy, probiotic vitamin-enriched foods full of nutrients and natural enzymes. Traditional sauerkraut, kimchi, kombucha, pickles – these crocks do it all and even can be used to brine olives and ferment beets, onions, beans, carrots, peppers and other vegetables. Crafted by skilled artisans from local clay deposits in a region of Poland known for excellent ceramics, each of the heavy earthenware pieces are fired at a temperature of more than 2,000°F and finished with a deep reddish-brown sienna glaze. Included stone weights keep vegetables under their fermenting liquid during fermentation. Fill the water channel with water to create an oxygen- and mold-free environment to promote lactic-acid vegetable fermentation. Each pot is lead- and cadmium-free, and intended for long-term food storage.





:laughing7:
 

RustyRelics

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from this website, http://www.oldantiquepottery.info/rrpco.htm:

"In 1900, Frank Ransbottom and his brother started a pottery company in Roseville, Ohio to make stoneware and pottery. By 1916 Ransbottom Pottery was the largest producer of stoneware jars in America. Around 1920, they merged with Robinson Clay Products Co. who created bricks and tiles. The name was changed to RRP Company (to reflect both initials) and product lines expanded to include gardenware in addition to their art pottery and functional goods. The company was able to endure through the great depression and was in business until 2005, when it finally ceased operations. Since RRP Co no longer exists, it fairly assured that their pottery will become more collectible and valuable in the future."



from an etsy post:

"The crown marks from the two companies are very similar, but the crocks produced by RRP have the crown impressed into the clay. ~ the crown mark on this crock is not impressed into the clay, thus dating it from 1900-1920's "​




There are no other markings on the crock besides the crown with the 6 in it. AND, that crown does not appear to be impressed into the clay. So, I am guessing it is also from 1900-1920's. That being said, @releventchair , this would have been from my Polish Grandmother, so sausage in fat.



Ya beat me to it. I've found pieces, but never whole ones. That's a good sized one.
 

WannaDig3687

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Time to sleep.
Say! Did the Cap’n even say good night scallywags, yet?

1652925749428.gif
 

releventchair

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Hang on or skip this post of a long rambling folks..

W.D.'s Gram's crock. Why wasn't it discarded long ago?

Ice tongs could wait in the barn after the rural electrification brought the magic to homesteads , eventually.. Just for insurance.
Everyone knew how to harvest and store ice.
For that window of time when a properly constructed root cellar and a springhouse were not enough during summers worse.
But , ice of old for putting in drinks or making ice cream was gone.
A market well beyond the U.S. itself for U.S. ice (even to the point a certain area's ice was held in esteem in England at high end events) soured as pollution fouled ice. Yet survival in comfort might be ahead if ice was wanted again...

Food. A good thing to have.
More so during a major weather event when the luxury and convenience of yesterday are gone. From tornado to a blizzard so bad shade trees near a home get thier tops (above the ground due to snow depth) cut off to feed the stove.
No , not due to laziness in stocking up wood for winter ;green wood is not preferred except to bank a fire for the night or when the stove will be unattended a good while. But out of necessity ,if not desperation.

Or during epidemics. Of which North America has seen a few.
Entire families on thier backs. With many dying.
Even entire communities.
Food put by not needing fuss to consume is vital at such times for survivors or the feeble. It may be a kind hearted community member stopping in to help by checking. Then feeding if required and food exists.

Historical accounts exist. I'm not making it up.

The winter without a summer.1816.
Think about a year with no "normal" crops.
By golly , a couple heads of cabbage put by would not have bothered me..

WW1.WW2.
WW1 citizens were encouraged to reduce or even stop the use of wheat and sugar. Our late entry into the war meant we were not affected the way others were. But it was a hint of what was to come.

WW2.
War rationing.
The words mean little today. But to those who experienced it , be well assured they understood having something put by. And of the oldest tradition of , 'makin do,"

Hooray war is over! (WW-1) For now.
Not everyone tossed money out the window or at flappers during the roaring twenties. As the old folks knew , what goes up does not always keep going up.
A great emotional sobriety was to slap a portion of this country with the arrival of the great dust bowl.
Humans can only thrive so much in ceaseless endless dust. Actually , they don't.
And tiptoeing onto the stage after the dustbowls intro? A ten year slide of the great depression. Malnutrition may have set a new record post native American era. Not due to neglect of diet. But of food scarcity . Period.
Historical accounts as ever ,exist.

Enter WW2. Now comes real wartime rationing America.
And generations of folks knowing what it's like to not have. To do without.
To tighten up thier belts till adding notches to tighten it up some more. Or at least to not buy tires.

What's a crock worth?
Well.....
A well waxed wooden bucket goes far.
But buckets have other uses and how many buckets are thrifty folk going to own? Of course they can be made. How many , when you're focus is on food for the winter?
And importantly , can they ( not unlike metal pails or iron kettles) sit unattended without concern in a springhouse or root celler without damage to them or thier contents?
Then too are crockery's charactoristic of thermal mass.
For kraut ,salted brines and saltpork or corned (large grained salt) beef ect. using a weight/rock to seal top plate , or at least keep it sunk below brine , the rock adds more thermal mass.
Meaning...Slower temperature swings.
A good thing when fermenting. A very good thing.
Also a couple warm hours a day during summer in a cellar or springhouse will have less effect on the slower temp change of mass,. And night times cooling will as slowly( like warmings effect did earlier) reduce the warmer stuff in the environment.

Gram knew the crocks qualities.
And multiple uses .
Probably recipes involved , easy like if asked.
And who had that crock fed when?
The crock held insurance. IF used right.
Or just a part of what food was stored for however long depending on a given food or amount or use.

Not many substitutes before plastic for a crock. And plastic might not match the thermal ability.
And making a bucket out of stone while done (as in horse troughs even) , is a luxury of time and labor. If tired hands were up to it.

But disease and war reduced manpower on homesteads.
No reason to expect it not to again.
Having the skill to grow or barter or acquire food and then store some for lean times , during scarcity or illness or natural disasters and events was something you either did , or suffered the consequences.
What other option existed?
And had charity or a handout been available would Gram accept it?
And if it came from other than her hands or her family's , (danged unlikely beyond a neighbor( S) sharing a little of thier own little) would she trust it as secure for tomorrow?

So the crock stayed. Stored safely.
Not just due to grim great depression memories.
But as a valued item for doing things with certain foods.
Besides it's other uses.

Some folks still like to make a good batch of something like kraut. Tradition.
Corned beef brisket from a supermarket?
Brisket is no prime cut to be sure. But a market was found for it....
Corn a good cut of beef. And enjoy a slice of history.
Heck , have some kraut on it on a good homemade rye bread.

And if you bake that bread yourself , help me to ! l.o.l..
Kidding. I'll keep trying.
 

releventchair

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Mornin all.


I went back to Ohio
But my city was gone
There was no train station
There was no downtown
South Howard had disappeared
All my favorite places
My city had been pulled down
Reduced to parking spaces
Ay, oh, way to go, Ohio
Well, I went back to Ohio
But my family was gone
I stood on the back porch
There was nobody home
I was stunned and amazed
My childhood memories
Slowly swirled past
Like the wind through the trees
Ay, oh, way to go, Ohio
I went back to Ohio
But my pretty countryside
Had been paved down the middle
By a government that had no pride
The farms of Ohio
Had been replaced by shopping malls
And Muzak filled the air
From Seneca to Cuyahoga Falls
Said, ay, oh, way to go, Ohio
 
Last edited:

releventchair

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The middle of the road is trying to find me
I'm standing in the middle of life with my plans behind me
Well I got a smile for everyone I meet
As long as you don't try dragging my bay
Or dropping the bomb on my street
Now come on baby
Get in the road
Oh, come on now
In the middle of the road, yeah
In the middle of the road you see the darndest things
Like fat guys driving 'round in jeeps through the city
Wearing big diamond rings and silk suits
Past corrugated tin shacks full up with kids
Oh, man I don't mean a Hampstead nursery
When you own a big chunk of the bloody Third World
The babies just come with the scenery
Oh, come on baby
Get in the road
Oh, come on now
In the middle of the road, yeah
One
Two
Three
Four
Five
Six
The middle of the road is no private cul-de-sac
I can't get from the cab to the curb
Without some little jerk on my back
Don't harass me, can't you tell
I'm going home, I'm tired as hell
I'm not the cat I used to be
I got a kid, I'm thirty-three
Baby, get in the road
Come on now
In the middle of the road
Yeah
Songwriters: Chrissie Hynde. For non-commercial use only.
Data From: Musixmatch
 

WannaDig3687

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Good morning, me hearties!

Miserable night. slept for 3 hours, up for 4-1/2, slept for 2 more hours. I can tell it is not going to be a very productive day.

I do want to rat someone out. @Oregon Viking posted a couple music videos. I couldn't listen to them for fear of waking the MR (no headphones to be found here). I log on when MR goes to work. I am thinking ,"I will listen to OV's music." OH BUT NO! HE DELETED THEM! What the heck! What'd you do that for? "Well, fine! I'll go back to sleep!" So, yea. it's OV's fault I didn't give you an earlier greeting. He done , ahem, ruined my corn flakes. :laughing9::laughing9:
 

old texan

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Alright big money high rollin tall cotton O.T.. Easy now.

Your going to need suspenders with that belt to keep your britches on totin all that coin from the bank after you drop that big ol check on em to cash...
:laughing7:
you re right rc--gold is heavier than steel and that s why my back is killin me all the time
 

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