Treasure Mountain, CO - Lost Frenchmens Gold

Aug 23, 2013
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Here's a picture of the Lue Map and my speculation about what it might mean.
View attachment 1302553


The pyramid with the T is Treasure Mountain. The shadow is on the west side of Treasure Mountain, so the sun is in the east. The five steps are five peaks east of Treasure Mountain. These peaks are Marble Mountain, Blanca Peak, Culebra Peak, Spanish Peaks and Black Mountain, nine miles east of Medano Pass. Black Mountain is a coded place name that I've posted about in the past. These peaks are also represented by the five lines going from Treasure Mountain to the east and represented by an arrow. If you go to google earth and mark these five peaks and then connect them with a line, you will have a shape similar to a pentagon. This is a huge surface layout of the constellation AURIGA. I've written about this layout in my KGC thread. If you split the word AURIGA into an AU and an RIGA, you have an AU which is the elemental symbol for GOLD. If you translate RIGA from Italian to English, you get LINE. GOLD LINE or GOLD LINES. The vertical column is the Mississippi River. The arrow shows that there will be five lines going east from Treasure Mountain. Three of these are important, the top and bottom bold marked lines and the middle line that extends to the point of the arrowhead. The eye with the circle over it represents Oak Island, O and EYE, O and I, Oak Island. The bold line of the arrowhead forms a V, this stands for Villamont, Virginia which represents the Beale legend. The three triangles at the bottom right of the Lue Map form a W which represents Wildcat Bluff, Arkansas, site of a KGC treasure legend. On google earth, start a line at each of these three sites and run the lines to Treasure Mountain. The line from Oak Island goes over Marble Mountain, the line from Villamont goes over Blanca Peak and the line from Wildcat Bluff goes over Culebra Peak. Run two more lines from Treasure Mountain over Black Mountain and Spanish Peaks and extend them east. I can't see where they go to a place of importance. If you look at these five lines, you will see that the three important lines have an unimportant line between them, just like the arrow on the Lue Map. You will also notice that the bottom line of unimportance is shown crossing the line of the Mississippi and the other unimportant line isn't. That's because the top line of unimportance is the Black Mountain line and Black Mountain is a coded name and must remain invisible. Another clue that shows the importance of the top, middle and bottom lines is the curved line that follows the arrow. It touches the bottom line, the top line and seems to end at the point of the arrowhead, same as the middle line.

Anyway, those are my observations, right or wrong.

Hello Mdog your observations right or wrong could be as correct and valid just as the many other 1 million and one versions of such a enigmatic puzzle? Sadly it may well be forever open to speculation? And that is problem of many treasure legends they taunt us of what if? While its fun to speculate it is in end we could spend our lives on such puzzles and still end up no further than where we began?

For me at least in regards to treasure legends the most promising ones is rather simple yet grounded in real people and events. I have one for the beautiful Colorado region, it was actually one of maybe one trio has already posted once posted somewhere ? if so I apologize for repeating it, if that's the case. While cynics may claim why give away a story with such promise? Well the trio really do not have the time to go further as they are involved in much more larger complex time consuming projects that for them that has more priority.It was an excellent story to research they gave me to follow up on a little as it shows promise. Yet perhaps you guys might know of it even though is a rather not so well know story these days. Yet it happened and of course like with all treasure legends there are gaps to be filled but the potential is there to continue.

Time gents is everyone enemy and I have a flight awaiting back to work in Brussels. Please remind me if you want to hear it on my return...


Amy
 
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UncleMatt

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Hello Mdog your observations right or wrong could be as correct and valid just as the many other 1 million and one versions of such a enigmatic puzzle? Sadly it may well be forever open to speculation? And that is problem of many treasure legends they taunt us of what if? While its fun to speculate it is in end we could spend our lives on such puzzles and still end up no further than where we began?

For me at least in regards to treasure legends the most promising ones is rather simple yet grounded in real people and events. I have one for the beautiful Colorado region, it was actually one of maybe one trio has already posted once posted somewhere ? if so I apologize for repeating it, if that's the case. While cynics may claim why give away a story with such promise? Well the trio really do not have the time to go further as they are involved in much more larger complex time consuming projects that for them that has more priority.It was an excellent story to research they gave me to follow up on a little as it shows promise. Yet perhaps you guys might know of it even though is a rather not so well know story these days. Yet it happened and of course like with all treasure legends there are gaps to be filled but the potential is there to continue.

Time gents is everyone enemy and I have a flight awaiting back to work in Brussels. Please remind me if you want to hear it on my return...


Amy

What is the story you are referring to Amy?
 

mdog

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Mar 22, 2011
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Hello Mdog your observations right or wrong could be as correct and valid just as the many other 1 million and one versions of such a enigmatic puzzle? Sadly it may well be forever open to speculation? And that is problem of many treasure legends they taunt us of what if? While its fun to speculate it is in end we could spend our lives on such puzzles and still end up no further than where we began?

For me at least in regards to treasure legends the most promising ones is rather simple yet grounded in real people and events. I have one for the beautiful Colorado region, it was actually one of maybe one trio has already posted once posted somewhere ? if so I apologize for repeating it, if that's the case. While cynics may claim why give away a story with such promise? Well the trio really do not have the time to go further as they are involved in much more larger complex time consuming projects that for them that has more priority.It was an excellent story to research they gave me to follow up on a little as it shows promise. Yet perhaps you guys might know of it even though is a rather not so well know story these days. Yet it happened and of course like with all treasure legends there are gaps to be filled but the potential is there to continue.

Time gents is everyone enemy and I have a flight awaiting back to work in Brussels. Please remind me if you want to hear it on my return...


Amy

Hello Amy. I hope things are going well in Brussels and I look forward to hearing your Colorado story whenever you have time.

I'm going to give some more opinions about the Lue Map and I realize that everybody has an opinion. I'll show you what caught my attention. I have a thread in the KGC forum called Things for Further Research that might prove helpful for anybody interested in this stuff.

First of all, I think this Lue Map shows movements of bullion from the western United States to points east. There are probably a lot more of these types of maps out there but closely guarded. Somehow, this map got away from it's owner, maybe stolen or found in the owners private papers after his death. It could be a one of a kind fraud, but I don't think so.
lue map.jpg


The three triangles in the bottom right corner are what caught my attention. From my research, I believe they represent three large regions of the United States. The small triangle on the line above them represents a change that was made at some time between 1910-1920. The triangle on the left has a big circle inside of it. If you've read Rebel KGC's posts, you know that a circle represents the full moon and an area of extreme value. This triangle represents the major precious metal producing regions in the American west and southwest. You will see three lines above the arrow that are extensions of three lines of the three big triangles below them. These lines, on a map of North America, would include the precious metal producing regions of Alaska and western Canada as well as parts of central Canada. Back to the big triangles at the lower right. The two big triangles on the right include eight smaller triangles and three partial triangles for a total of eleven triangles. These would represent eleven regions that cover the United States east of the precious metal producing regions. You will also notice that the vertical column, that is the Mississippi River, includes eleven lines inside the sides of the column. The two sides of the column makes the total number of lines, on the column, thirteen, which could be a confirmation of ownership.

Ok, where the bold curved line crosses the column and intersects the bold bottom line of the arrow, is the location of St. Louis. I know this because a couple years ago I figured out where the big triangles are and St. Louis is almost dead center of a line going from the west line of the middle triangle to the east line of the eastern triangle. When you figure this line, you have to mark the latitude of St. Louis and mark that latitude on the two lines then measure from St. Louis to both points. There is a difference of only a few miles.

It is very possible that the small horizontal line, in the middle of the column above St. Louis, is a town on the Mississippi River that would receive bullion shipments from the west and then distribute them to the appropriate region. This small horizontal line could be changed, as needed, to indicate alternative locations along the Mississippi River. The distance from St. Louis, either north or south, would indicate what town on the river would receive the bullion shipment. Such a change would call for a change in the map. It might be that the gold lines, that I described in an earlier post, would be used to determine receiving areas along the Mississippi or distribution spots away from the river.

I post this stuff just in case somebody can use it. Like you say, Amy, there are a million ideas and who knows if the right one will ever be found.

Rick
 

sdcfia

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Hello Amy. I hope things are going well in Brussels and I look forward to hearing your Colorado story whenever you have time.

I'm going to give some more opinions about the Lue Map and I realize that everybody has an opinion. I'll show you what caught my attention. I have a thread in the KGC forum called Things for Further Research that might prove helpful for anybody interested in this stuff.

First of all, I think this Lue Map shows movements of bullion from the western United States to points east. There are probably a lot more of these types of maps out there but closely guarded. Somehow, this map got away from it's owner, maybe stolen or found in the owners private papers after his death. It could be a one of a kind fraud, but I don't think so.
View attachment 1303245


The three triangles in the bottom right corner are what caught my attention. From my research, I believe they represent three large regions of the United States. The small triangle on the line above them represents a change that was made at some time between 1910-1920. The triangle on the left has a big circle inside of it. If you've read Rebel KGC's posts, you know that a circle represents the full moon and an area of extreme value. This triangle represents the major precious metal producing regions in the American west and southwest. You will see three lines above the arrow that are extensions of three lines of the three big triangles below them. These lines, on a map of North America, would include the precious metal producing regions of Alaska and western Canada as well as parts of central Canada. Back to the big triangles at the lower right. The two big triangles on the right include eight smaller triangles and three partial triangles for a total of eleven triangles. These would represent eleven regions that cover the United States east of the precious metal producing regions. You will also notice that the vertical column, that is the Mississippi River, includes eleven lines inside the sides of the column. The two sides of the column makes the total number of lines, on the column, thirteen, which could be a confirmation of ownership.

Ok, where the bold curved line crosses the column and intersects the bold bottom line of the arrow, is the location of St. Louis. I know this because a couple years ago I figured out where the big triangles are and St. Louis is almost dead center of a line going from the west line of the middle triangle to the east line of the eastern triangle. When you figure this line, you have to mark the latitude of St. Louis and mark that latitude on the two lines then measure from St. Louis to both points. There is a difference of only a few miles.

It is very possible that the small horizontal line, in the middle of the column above St. Louis, is a town on the Mississippi River that would receive bullion shipments from the west and then distribute them to the appropriate region. This small horizontal line could be changed, as needed, to indicate alternative locations along the Mississippi River. The distance from St. Louis, either north or south, would indicate what town on the river would receive the bullion shipment. Such a change would call for a change in the map. It might be that the gold lines, that I described in an earlier post, would be used to determine receiving areas along the Mississippi or distribution spots away from the river.

I post this stuff just in case somebody can use it. Like you say, Amy, there are a million ideas and who knows if the right one will ever be found.

Rick

Wow, Rick, that is very interesting. Like you said, there have been many attempts to decipher this map, and yours makes as much sense - or more - than any I've seen. I say that because you've shared your extraordinary mapping research with me and I can see how your LUE ideas may be related.

For those readers who sneer at conspiracy theories relating to US treasure legends (tsk, tsk), you would be astounded to see Rick's work. Not only has he done diligent historical research, but has also clearly demonstrated a geometric grid based on his original proprietary ideas that link treasure legends, place names and other factors into a ... well, a gigantic web of precisely placed "coincidences". Ha ha.

The concept underlying this is ancient - start out with the Cort Lindahl videos and begin proving things for yourself on Google Earth. Then begin researching the theories underlying the so-called KGC-OAK-Masonic (or whatever you want to call this organization) treasure caches. Unfortunately, this is a steep daunting task, best proven by painstaking hands-on experience, which is hard to come by. Good luck.

If our modern generation - overflowing with hubris, as is always the case with humans - assumes that those who preceded us were not sophisticated enough to execute complicated conspiracies designed to keep secret information out of the hands of the riffraff public, then those assumptions will keep us permanently in a dogmatic box of wrong beliefs, IMO. I've proven to myself the reality of the premise, but I can't prove it to others. Others will have to prove it to themselves. Listening to guys like Rick is a good idea - he's a very good observer and doesn't have an axe to grind.
 

mdog

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Hey Sdcfia, Thank you very much for the kind comments. The information you have provided, over the years, has proven very helpful to me in my research. It's unfortunate that most people have no interest in these treasure related mysteries.

The way I would read this map would be to consider the rectangles as representing an inventory to be moved to the east. The accumulation point would be on the Mississippi River two places (20 miles, 50 miles, 75 miles etc.) above St. Louis. The small line above St. Louis touches three vertical lines, so the inventory would be delivered to the regions those lines represent. The upper left side symbols would show where the shipment came from, San Luis Valley region. Whoever was interpreting the map would have to know which line matched which small triangle. The beauty of it is, the matches on the lines and triangles could be changed whenever required so there would be no set location for the eleven lines. If the accumulation point were below St. Louis, the bold line crossing the column would be on the top instead of the bottom. That would give you a lot of area along the Mississippi to work with. I think the idea would work well.


It would be real nice to have a similar map with a different accumulation point and areas of distribution so we could get a better idea of how it works.
 

lastleg

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It's always the small details. Gifting the San Luis valley region with a special role in bullion shipments
needs to be established.
 

audigger53

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Louis Lamour also used it for a story of his, "Treasure Mountain". If you want some starting points, good maps in the book also, if they are still there. My copy is fairly old. Never went looking for it though.
 

sdcfia

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lastleg

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Beau L'Amour published a series of six Western Magazines. Bought all through PubClearinghouse and
put them in protective plastic and never opened them until tonight. I haven't seen a reference to
Treasure Mtn so far. It has several prominent western authors stories in them but none were written
by Louis according to Beau in the premier issue.
 

UncleMatt

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L'Amour once owned a large ranch west of Durango, CO. I used to hunt there back in the 1980's. And I don't care what others choose to believe, I am not a fan of conspiracy theories.
 

TN_Guest1523

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Hoping someone on the forum can help me solve a small mystery, while at the same time generating some interest in and old story that isn't quite as well known as many. I will provide all of the detail I can scrape together and hopefully someone will be able to answer the one question I have:

Where does this story originally come from?


Allegedly posted in a Colorado newspaper in the early 1900s, I can find plenty of references to the article but no conformation that the article in fact exists r a specific bibliographic clue to point me to the original article. The story has been retold for nearly a century, but the original story eludes me. Can anyone help?

 
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Randy Bradford

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Hey Randy, you might be right about a connection between the Lue Map and the Treasure Mountain Legend. I've never studied the Lue Map before, but with just some basic knowledge about treasure legends, and using google earth, you can connect eight treasure legends with the Lue Map. It could be the Lue Map leads to three areas associated with treasure legends, Oak Island, the Beale and Wildcat Bluff down in Arkansas, top, middle and bottom. The O over the eye (I), Oak Island, the bold faced point of the arrow forming a V, Villamont, Virginia, Beale legend, and the three triangles in the lower right corner forming a W, Wildcat Bluff, Arkansas, KGC treasure legend. If you go to google earth and run lines from these three places to Treasure Mountain, you pass over Marble Mountain, Blanca Peak and Culebra Peak, all associated with treasure legends.

Just speculation but maybe something somebody can use in their research.

I get the distinct impression you're making fun of me.

That said, the LUE has been associated with Blanca and Culbera Peak, can't say anything about Marble Mountain though. Many have thought the Pyramid was a representation of Pyramid Mountain which is also in that region. I believe the Hilton article used Pyramid Mountain as a baseline, but I'd have to check my notes which aren't handy at the moment.

I posted this before I read a lot of your explanations, I agree with Amy...your theories are at least as valid as any other, and more so than many simply based on the thought you've put into them. I claim to know plenty about the LUE, I don't claim I can break it. I'm not sure what I'd do if I could or did frankly.

I have to confess, my sense of nostalgia and romanticism is far more powerful than my urge to put a shovel to unfamiliar ground based on nothing but an idea and faith. that probably sounds silly to many, but I make no apologies for it. My interest in the LUE has opened doors to new avenues of learning and previously unrecognized historical interest and paved the way for a new hobby. All of those are worthwhile measures of success in my estimation.
 
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Randy Bradford

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I would also point out that the version of the LUE most often seen is not the original. There are two small dots missing when compared with the version published in 1966. The one most frequently posted, and posted here, was the one published in the RAM reprints of Treasure Hunters Manual #7 throughout the 1970s. For whatever reason, they took a few small liberties with the map...its anyone's guess at that point how influential those changes are.
 

mdog

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I get the distinct impression you're making fun of me.

That said, the LUE has been associated with Blanca and Culbera Peak, can't say anything about Marble Mountain though. Many have thought the Pyramid was a representation of Pyramid Mountain which is also in that region. I believe the Hilton article used Pyramid Mountain as a baseline, but I'd have to check my notes which aren't handy at the moment.

I posted this before I read a lot of your explanations, I agree with Amy...your theories are at least as valid as any other, and more so than many simply based on the thought you've put into them. I claim to know plenty about the LUE, I don't claim I can break it. I'm not sure what I'd do if I could or did frankly.

I have to confess, my sense of nostalgia and romanticism is far more powerful than my urge to put a shovel to unfamiliar ground based on nothing but an idea and faith. that probably sounds silly to many, but I make no apologies for it. My interest in the LUE has opened doors to new avenues of learning and previously unrecognized historical interest and paved the way for a new hobby. All of those are worthwhile measures of success in my estimation.

I'm not making fun of you, Randy. I've put a lot of research and some money into your thread. I wrote that my interpretation of the map is just my opinion. I would have gone into more detail about the map but, frankly, I didn't feel there was enough interest in my thoughts about the map. I'm not trying to convince anybody about anything. I post what I see or find and if anybody can use it, that's great. At this time, I'm waiting for an interpretation of a Spanish document that speaks of the explorations of Louis de Villemont. A few days ago, I received some documents from the New Mexico Archives about an expedition from Canada toward New Mexico. These letters also need translated but I don't think the boss is gonna let me fork out anymore cash for a translation. I'm hoping to find somebody who will do it for personal satisfaction instead of cash. Sdcfia suggested I try google translation and feed it one sentence at a time. I might give this a shot and see what happens. I plan on sharing this information with you and the other tnet members, and will be happy to do so. :thumbsup: If you would like me to go into more detail about the LUE map, and what I see, I'll be happy to. Also, you might want to read my thread in the KGC forum, Things for Further Research, and you will get some idea of where my thoughts are coming from as far as the LUE map goes.
 
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Randy Bradford

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mdog, my bad...I was reading from front to back and responded before I saw some other stuff you posted later. Appreciate the clarity though. Seems ot me a few more mountains might be related to LUE history as I know it. I'll see what I can dig up.
 

sdcfia

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Hey Randy, I know you have a lot on your ever-growing plate, but you might also think about the Beale Treasure legend, how it surfaced and if it might somehow interface with the Treasure Mountain saga (and maybe even the LUE). Notwithstanding all the Beale code-cypher stuff, the gold presumably came from the same part of Colorado in the early 1800s.
 

mdog

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mdog, my bad...I was reading from front to back and responded before I saw some other stuff you posted later. Appreciate the clarity though. Seems ot me a few more mountains might be related to LUE history as I know it. I'll see what I can dig up.

:occasion14:
 

TN_Guest1523

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One thing that I have found in the study of this particular topic is, that there was gold mines in the East half of what is now the State of Colorado . Spanish have been mining this area from about the 1600's . French soon after that . Leblanc, or Ledoux or Lebreau, it was the second attempt from New Orleans about 1780's that was what I was interested in . The Governor of New Orleans had paid for it and one of the maps would have been given to him . The man who made the maps first name was Reme .

About 1810 Thomas Beale left his Virginia home that was 12 miles from Bufords Tavern, he knew the area well . The job he had for the Orleans Territory was Register of wills . The court met one day a month and he would be the one to hold all the property for probate . He had others working for him that would take over the job if he could not be there for some reason . The Beale Papers state that it was 1820 the first time Robert Morriss first seen Beale . Thomas Beale became a Captain of a militia of riflemen in 1814-15 and was in the Battle of New Orleans . He after that was still working as the Register of wills and had access to all sorts of Documents within the Vaults of the Archives at the time not to mention all documents from people who died at that time including Reme Leblanc, Lebreau or Ledoux .

What I have research has led me to believe that the Beale Party was there to find Gold that was left from the 1785 failed attempt . Mr Morriss only knew what the Beale letters told him about the adventure Captain Thomas Beale was on, the letters and documents in the box left by Beale with the ciphers in 1822 is all Morriss had to go on . What we see today in the Beale Papers is Mr Morriss's deposition about the history of all he knew, we have copies of these letters that Morriss had from Beale only because Beale was setting up plan B in the event they all died on this adventure .

I do believe the Beale Papers are the evidence of the third attempt from New Orleans to get gold out of the soon to be East Colorado area . If I am correct there is no more gold hidden from the second attempt made by Reme, but possibly there is the larger first attempt by the group of 350 or so men still in the ground somewhere there in Colorado .
 

mdog

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In the Josiah Ward Treasure Mountain series of 1921, one of the segments is titled "The Mystery of the Buried Treasure Chart". In this article, Ward writes that one of his readers informed him that the dates of the original French expedition were from 1798-1802. While looking through a register of documents in the archives of New Mexico, I noticed a letter dated July 14, 1797. A brief summary of the letter said that an expedition from Halifax, Nova Scotia could threaten Spanish territory. I received a copy of the document but it was written in old Spanish and had not been translated. Sdcfia contacted Mike McChesney, Gollum, and Mike agreed to translate the letter. Here is Mike's rough translation of the letter.

Finding myself with news that the English are thinking of Domains S.M. (?Domains of his Spanish Majesty?) in this America , forming an expedition of 9-10000 men, out of Halifax in Canada , which I could just see try something against that province if down the river Missouri and others who enter the Mississippi then notice VM. cautioning that this with the utmost vigilance and to seek inquiry dispatching some Indian allies to the most distant to maintain communication. Whether those enemies made ​​the expedition and passages of our possessions to the route taking VM for this purpose. All measures reserved to suggest his zeal and knowledge.

Mike also provided the following link. Start reading on page 77.

https://books.google.com/books?id=q...page&q=canada attack new orleans 1797&f=false

After reading the link, you will see that the expedition from Halifax was misinformation fabricated by the French spy, Collot.

Thanks to Sdcfia for contacting Mike and thank you Mike for your time and expertise.
 
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